Do I have a shot at IB?

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empyreal7
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Hi, I’m about to start my third year of a BSc Economics programme at the University of Bristol. I’ll likely come out with a high 2:1, maybe a first though probably pushing it. I have strong a levels (A*A*A) and I secured a summer internship at a good accounting firm (just below big 4) in audit which I am completing now. I’ve got a few minor business/finance related courses to pad out my CV a bit.

I looked into IB a while back but gave up on it as was going through some tough personal circumstances. Things have looked up a lot and I’m wondering whether I would still have a shot? I know banks usually recruit from targets (although I’ve seen Bristol described as a semi-target) and I don’t have any spring weeks or banking internships so being brutally honest have I missed the boat? Is it a waste of time to apply this year as the amount of additional prep is significant.
Lastly, if it is a waste of time would a postgraduate degree (maybe from Bristol as I get a decent discount) give me a significant better chance? Thanks
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Bk4753
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(Original post by empyreal7)
Hi, I’m about to start my third year of a BSc Economics programme at the University of Bristol. I’ll likely come out with a high 2:1, maybe a first though probably pushing it. I have strong a levels (A*A*A) and I secured a summer internship at a good accounting firm (just below big 4) in audit which I am completing now. I’ve got a few minor business/finance related courses to pad out my CV a bit.

I looked into IB a while back but gave up on it as was going through some tough personal circumstances. Things have looked up a lot and I’m wondering whether I would still have a shot? I know banks usually recruit from targets (although I’ve seen Bristol described as a semi-target) and I don’t have any spring weeks or banking internships so being brutally honest have I missed the boat? Is it a waste of time to apply this year as the amount of additional prep is significant.
Lastly, if it is a waste of time would a postgraduate degree (maybe from Bristol as I get a decent discount) give me a significant better chance? Thanks
You have a shot. If you want to get an MFin for IB, Look at LSE, Oxbridge, LBS. Warwick, ICL and UCL (at a stretch) are decent alternatives. Bristol is good for undergrad, but an Msc from there is not going to boost your chances of getting into IB.

Banks recruit from Bristol undergrad; It's a strong semi-target. At this point, I'd advise applying to banks that take final year interns or telling them you intend to do an Msc (preferably at one of the aforementioned universities), so you'd be in your penultimate year of education. The process is a crapshoot but there are quite a few things you need to get in order if you want to be a serious, stand out applicant.

- Know technicals cold. I was asked DCF analysis qs at all the banks I applied for. If you want to be competitive, you need to know the basic accounting because your competitors do.

- Know why IB. 3 solid, structured points. "your natural conscientiousness", "the steep learning curve", "thriving under pressure" etc. Better if it's original, ok if it's cliche. Important thing is that it's structured, but NOT robotic.

- Know why the bank. look at deals they've done that interest you or elements of their culture that align with yours.

- know at least 2 deals they've done inside out. Strategic rationale, deal value, nature of transaction. Mergersight is good for this.

- Most importantly, Know what's going on in the industry of the coverage group you're interested in. Generally, know what's going on in M&A. A lack of commerical awareness is what sinks the majority of casual applicants.

Source: Incoming IBD Analyst.
Last edited by Bk4753; 1 month ago
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empyreal7
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(Original post by Bk4753)
You have a shot. If you want to get an MFin for IB, Look at LSE, Oxbridge, LBS. Warwick, ICL and UCL (at a stretch) are decent alternatives. Bristol is good for undergrad, but an Msc from there is not going to boost your chances of getting into IB.

Banks recruit from Bristol undergrad; It's a strong semi-target. At this point, I'd advise applying to banks that take final year interns or telling them you intend to do an Msc (preferably at one of the aforementioned universities), so you'd be in your penultimate year of education. The process is a crapshoot but there are quite a few things you need to get in order if you want to be a serious, stand out applicant.

- Know technicals cold. I was asked DCF analysis qs at all the banks I applied for. If you want to be competitive, you need to know the basic accounting because your competitors do.

- Know why IB. 3 solid, structured points. "your natural conscientiousness", "the steep learning curve", "thriving under pressure" etc. Better if it's original, ok if it's cliche. Important thing is that it's structured, but NOT robotic.

- Know why the bank. look at deals they've done that interest you or elements of their culture that align with yours.

- know at least 2 deals they've done inside out. Strategic rationale, deal value, nature of transaction. Mergersight is good for this.

- Most importantly, Know what's going on in the industry of the coverage group you're interested in. Generally, know what's going on in M&A. A lack of commerical awareness is what sinks the majority of casual applicants.

Source: Incoming IBD Analyst.
Thanks so much. Encouraging and challenging advice. Much appreciated.
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empyreal7
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(Original post by Bk4753)
You have a shot. If you want to get an MFin for IB, Look at LSE, Oxbridge, LBS. Warwick, ICL and UCL (at a stretch) are decent alternatives. Bristol is good for undergrad, but an Msc from there is not going to boost your chances of getting into IB.

Banks recruit from Bristol undergrad; It's a strong semi-target. At this point, I'd advise applying to banks that take final year interns or telling them you intend to do an Msc (preferably at one of the aforementioned universities), so you'd be in your penultimate year of education. The process is a crapshoot but there are quite a few things you need to get in order if you want to be a serious, stand out applicant.

- Know technicals cold. I was asked DCF analysis qs at all the banks I applied for. If you want to be competitive, you need to know the basic accounting because your competitors do.

- Know why IB. 3 solid, structured points. "your natural conscientiousness", "the steep learning curve", "thriving under pressure" etc. Better if it's original, ok if it's cliche. Important thing is that it's structured, but NOT robotic.

- Know why the bank. look at deals they've done that interest you or elements of their culture that align with yours.

- know at least 2 deals they've done inside out. Strategic rationale, deal value, nature of transaction. Mergersight is good for this.

- Most importantly, Know what's going on in the industry of the coverage group you're interested in. Generally, know what's going on in M&A. A lack of commerical awareness is what sinks the majority of casual applicants.

Source: Incoming IBD Analyst.
Also, if I apply for third year internships and managed to convert it into a grad offer, which I understand is the dominant method of hiring (please correct me if wrong), would that be starting the same year or the following? Don't want to be left hanging about for a year or have to complete one year of a grad scheme somewhere else. I know this comes with x amount of caveats and is hypothetical but if I'm going to invest sufficient time to give myself a chance I need to know the process.
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