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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Ahem :p:
    I do not envy you. Or myself now.

    Although it would be weird if I did envy myself...[/brainloop]
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    (Original post by K.T.)
    My first reaction was 'hey, I could have sworn I didn't phrase it like that!' *self-facepalm*

    [This is why not to spend all day on essays about german culture. The brain, it pickles...]

    Anyways, how can you actually find time to master this harem of wood, brass & other assorted materials? I struggle to find time enough for one.
    It's what I do in the evenings when not on TSR

    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Ahem :p:How many of your instruments did you use here last term?
    Not all of them I have to admit :o: Two of them every week, one of them quite often, one once or twice and the other three not often at all :o:

    However, I'm bringing different instruments this time, ones that don't take up any room (4 are various types of whistles). Most likely I'll use all bar one this term, the Bb clarinet having to come with me out of a sense of duty more than anything else.
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    (Original post by smailik99)
    And how I must to write there???
    Have you never used a search engine on the internet before? Type a keyword into the empty space and click the search link underneath it.
    On the top right hand corner of the 'Cambridge University Forum' there's a big blue button called 'Search this Forum'. Click on it.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Not all of them I have to admit :o: Two of them every week, one of them quite often, one once or twice and the other three not often at all :o:
    Then why are you bringing ten?

    I'd love to be critical, but I have 8 pretty mugs on a shelf and probably over 10 others stored. And I don't use all of them :o:
    (Original post by K.T.)

    Although it would be weird if I did envy myself...[/brainloop]
    :hahaha:
    Anyway, where have you moved to?

    I need chocolate :hmpf: Why oh why do I inflict health on myself!? :argh:
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    :troll:

    ?
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    :troll:

    ?
    No idea, but probably wishful thinking...
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Then why are you bringing ten?

    I'd love to be critical, but I have 8 pretty mugs on a shelf and probably over 10 others stored. And I don't use all of them :o:

    :hahaha:
    Anyway, where have you moved to?
    Someone or other said that you should not have anything that you do not consider to be beautiful or know to be useful. That is my answer :p:
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Someone or other said that you should not have anything that you do not consider to be beautiful or know to be useful. That is my answer :p:
    I wouldn't bait the philosophers on this thread...
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    I can't remember who said it now
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    (Original post by The West Wing)
    I was reading an interesting anthropology book and it raised an interesting point - isn't the fact that we still don't have robots that make breakfast for us the conclusive evidence we need that engineering as a discipline has failed?
    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :eyeball: :rofl:
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    (Original post by The West Wing)
    I was reading an interesting anthropology book and it raised an interesting point - isn't the fact that we still don't have robots that make breakfast for us the conclusive evidence we need that engineering as a discipline has failed?
    Sounds like a rather rubbish point IMO(although there are often fantastic points raised by anthropology)
    Human knowledge and mastery is an eternal project from our current viewpoint. No discipline can totally fail or succeed, it can only experience setbacks and progress. The correct way to see it is that Engineering has not yet produced robots to make our breakfast for us.
    Anyhow, I'd be pretty annoyed if it had managed that now.. throwing away large amounts of energy, intellect and resources instead of resolving one of several more pressing human needs.
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    (Original post by Cragyrax)
    :hahaha:
    Anyway, where have you moved to?

    I need chocolate :hmpf: Why oh why do I inflict health on myself!? :argh:
    Um, I'm not quite sure yet... somewhere out near Kingston-Upon-Thames, I think. I'll find out in the Easter vacation

    Oh, & chocolate is health. Mental heath :cool:
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    (Original post by K.T.)

    Oh, & chocolate is health. Mental heath :cool:
    *wastes away into coma* :coma:


    West Wing: my post is not intended to be The Final Say - you can reply to it...
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    From a technical point of view, such things do exist, they are called "toasters" "frying pans" "kettles" and so on

    There have been machines made that will do more, but they are not considerably better than the ones out there. Besides, even in an ideal system one would have to buy the bread and so on, put it in the robot, make sure that said bread doesn't go mouldy etc. Anything more would require a degree of thought well beyond the space limitations of a typical kitchen. A robotic valet a la Jeeves is not inconceivable, but is unlikely to materialise at least until the next miniaturisation barrier has been realised.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    From a technical point of view, such things do exist, they are called "toasters" "frying pans" "kettles" and so on

    :mad:

    I was halffway through writing exactly that when I refreshed the camchat thread in another tab and saw you'd gotten there first >.<
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    A robotic valet a la Jeeves is not inconceivable, but is unlikely to materialise at least until the next miniaturisation barrier has been realised.
    You sure about that, though? Many of those robots that Japanese and S-Korean car and tech companies seem to love building and showing off so much seem to have the necessary movement and dexterity sorted...I'd have thought the limitations are more in the programming/software/AI, not mechanical problems with minituarisation.
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    (Original post by Tom)
    You sure about that, though? Many of those robots that Japanese and S-Korean car and tech companies seem to love building and showing off so much seem to have the necessary movement and dexterity sorted...I'd have thought the limitations are more in the programming/software/AI, not mechanical problems with minituarisation.
    I meant miniaturisation of transistors / logic circuits rather than with dexterity. I don't *think* that a computer capable of the computation necessary to deal with the fact that you left the bread out and put a cake in the bread bin can be fitted inside a small robot :p:

    (Original post by Tom)
    :mad:

    I was halffway through writing exactly that when I refreshed the camchat thread in another tab and saw you'd gotten there first >.<
    :proud:
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    (Original post by K.T.)
    Also also, I've got through over half of my vacation work (minus the essays, we must never speak of them...) in the last two days.
    What essays? :ninja: And it's nice to know that I wasn't the only one who left it all until the last minute, I just need to proof-read my History essay and then I would have finished all my set vac-work having started on Monday. :o:

    (Original post by K.T.)
    Par-tay. :cool:
    Indeed. :party:
    Anyone else planning to go to the thing at Soul Tree Sunday night?
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    Gnargh. I am convinced that everything takes me twice as long as it does other people! :banghead:
    uber rant about my boring day

    Today:
    1: Wake up at 11. Drink caffeine. Prepare breakfast. Very sleepily wake up. Have a long bath. Get washing together, find coins for laundry.
    2: Go to Fen court to wash clothes at 1:30 Go to library and start reading Bourdieu. Go back in 30mins to take first washing out of machine and put it in dryer. Return to book. 15mins later return to washing to take second load out of washing machine and into a dryer and put first load on second dryer cycle (ours are crap) Return to book for another 20mins. Go back to washing and take the first lot out of dryer and put second lot in for final dry. Go back to book. Return again, retrieve all the washing. Collect books (its now around 4) go home. Change into MUCH warmer clothes.
    3: Go to Kings. Meet SPS friend for coffee and chat till 6, go home.
    4: Go to the gym round 6:30. Interval training for 40mins. Get home round 7:30.
    5: Housemate returns from vacation simultaneously to my getting back. Chat a bit in hallway. Run upstairs to see how food that college husband has started cooking is going. Chat to him and other friend for a bit. Sort out washing and tidy room. Eat dinner. Clean up. All of this ends at 11pm - I kid you not :hmpf:

    Which brings me to now...:banghead:

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    (Original post by ukebert)
    I meant miniaturisation of transistors / logic circuits rather than with dexterity. I don't *think* that a computer capable of the computation necessary to deal with the fact that you left the bread out and put a cake in the bread bin can be fitted inside a small robot :p:
    Surely the limiting factor on robot intelligence right now isn't processing power, is it? Seems very, very unlikely to me - after all, animation companies and medical researchers and climate modellers and so on run massive, enormous server farms to give themselves the processing power necessary, or hire supercomputers, or whatever, but you don't ever hear of AI researchers doing similar. I thought it was more a problem that no-one's quite figured out how to make a program that *learns* without supervision, and obviously trying to program a solution for every situation in advance is a dead end.

    And even if processing power is a limitation, and you would need a warehouse full of servers, it's not like they have to be crammed into the robot itself! It can send the inputs - visual, tactile, whatever, information to the computers, let them think about it, then recieve the outputs (signals to move joint motors, etc) in return. Wouldn't need insane amounts of bandwidth, and so could be done over the air rather than needing cables or anything.
 
 
 
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