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    (Original post by love_one)
    I'm not sure if I should post on this thread but can any Cambridge economics students tell me the amount of work you have in the 1st year and how many hours you spend on average working?

    I have finally decided to accept Cambridge as my firm choice over LSE!
    I'm assuming that you have an offer for Economics then. Firstly, well done! But to tell you the truth, that was the easy part.

    As a first year Economist, you'll have around fourteen hours of lectures a week (thankfully all in the morning but with some 9AM starts) and (depending on your college) around five supervisions every two weeks, one for each of the five papers. Your independent study time will almost exclusively be devoted to completing the assignments set for the supervisions. Paper 1 (Microeconomics) is mostly logic and mathematical questions, Paper 2 (Macroeconomics) is mostly models and essays, Paper 3 (Quantitative Methods) is maths and stats, Paper 4 (Political and Sociological Aspects) will be essays, as will Paper 5 (British Economic History). I think it takes me an average of ten hours of work to complete a supervision assignment, but there is quite a large variance depending on the conceptually difficulty of the questions and the amount of reading (which can be quite excessive for Politics and Macro). So on average (including weekends) I think I do around four to five hours of independent study a day, which is probably about the norm for first year Economists.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I'm assuming that you have an offer for Economics then. Firstly, well done! But to tell you the truth, that was the easy part.

    As a first year Economist, you'll have around fourteen hours of lectures a week (thankfully all in the morning but with some 9AM starts) and (depending on your college) around five supervisions every two weeks, one for each of the five papers. Your independent study time will almost exclusively be devoted to completing the assignments set for the supervisions. Paper 1 (Microeconomics) is mostly logic and mathematical questions, Paper 2 (Macroeconomics) is mostly models and essays, Paper 3 (Quantitative Methods) is maths and stats, Paper 4 (Political and Sociological Aspects) will be essays, as will Paper 5 (British Economic History). I think it takes me an average of ten hours of work to complete a supervision assignment, but there is quite a large variance depending on the conceptually difficulty of the questions and the amount of reading (which can be quite excessive for Politics and Macro). So on average (including weekends) I think I do around four to five hours of independent study a day, which is probably about the norm for first year Economists.
    Thanks ! I have an offer from Trinity- I fell in love with the place after a school trip in year 11!

    Wow! That sounds like a lot of work! :redface:
    So much more than I am doing now. I'm very lazy sometimes- don't know how I am going to cope!

    Economists still have a lot of fun I hope?
    Can't wait for the May Ball already :tongue:
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    (Original post by Gesar)
    I've just done four questions from this example sheet in under 40 minutes :woo:

    They're probably the easiest questions available though

    EDIT: 5 questions in under an hour
    ooh exciting times! :jive: which sheet?
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    (Original post by Scipio90)
    There was an engineering lecture notes booklet type thing lying around in hall earlier. After looking at it, it seems engineers actually do use j for sqrt(-1). I knew that, but always thought at the back of my mind it was some sort of urban myth...
    Confusingly we use j in electronics, but still keep on with i in maths. Even worse though is the putting of the j in front of the number as in (3+j5) - its just wrong
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    (Original post by Y__)
    I'm not 100% sure about the right terms, but I guess you'll understand what I mean: I can't think of any german sentence that could work like that. Seems to me like "im Bahnhof" is a local adverbial that tries to be a subject, but I think that is never the case?
    Not really:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Die Kinder spielen im Bahnhof = im Bahnhof wird gespielt. (The children are playing in the station = playing is happening in the station. (Yes, we don't say this in English, but you can in German. :tongue:))
    Der Zug kommt im Bahnhof an = im Bahnhof wird angekommen. (The train is arriving at the station = arriving is happening at the station.)

    See the problem? :tongue:
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    (Original post by -Matt-)
    Confusingly we use j in electronics, but still keep on with i in maths. Even worse though is the putting of the j in front of the number as in (3+j5) - its just wrong
    This. I refuse to write 2+j5. It is 2+5j.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Not really:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Die Kinder spielen im Bahnhof = im Bahnhof wird gespielt. (The children are playing in the station = playing is happening in the station. (Yes, we don't say this in English, but you can in German. :tongue:))
    Der Zug kommt im Bahnhof an = im Bahnhof wird angekommen. (The train is arriving at the station = arriving is happening at the station.)

    See the problem? :tongue:
    Ah yes. I'm clearly not in a good shape today .
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    :rofl: What's the term for that? Syllepsis, is it?
    Erm, well it's not really syllepsis because (depending on how you analyse particle verbs), run up and run down are actually totally different lexical entries, which is why the construction doesn't work. But it's the analogy with sylleptic constructions using transitive prepositional constituents (e.g. John ran up the hill and down the valley) that makes it funny.
    (Original post by Scipio90)
    There was an engineering lecture notes booklet type thing lying around in hall earlier. After looking at it, it seems engineers actually do use j for sqrt(-1). I knew that, but always thought at the back of my mind it was some sort of urban myth...
    The further maths course I did (OCR MEI) was funded by engineers or something and insisted on using j. So I just persistently called it i to annoy the teachers.
    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Die Kinder spielen im Bahnhof = im Bahnhof wird gespielt. (The children are playing in the station = playing is happening in the station. (Yes, we don't say this in English, but you can in German. ))
    Der Zug kommt im Bahnhof an = im Bahnhof wird angekommen. (The train is arriving at the station = arriving is happening at the station.)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I'm not brilliant at German syntax, as I've never really learnt German, but it might be that the additonal preposition in the second sentence prevents the nominalisation or whatever, although it might be more complex and to do with argument structure. I'll ask some German speakers and/or syntacticians tomorrow. There're bound to be hundreds of papers on a construction like this.

    Anyway, my supervisor just rearranged my supervision to Thursday, which is great as I now have breathing space to write my essay.
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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
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    I'm not brilliant at German syntax, as I've never really learnt German, but it might be that the additonal preposition in the second sentence prevents the nominalisation or whatever, although it might be more complex and to do with argument structure. I'll ask some German speakers and/or syntacticians tomorrow. There're bound to be hundreds of papers on a construction like this.

    Anyway, my supervisor just rearranged my supervision to Thursday, which is great as I now have breathing space to write my essay.
    Spoiler:
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    It can't be the extra preposition: Martin lädt den Akku auf. / Der Akku wird aufgeladen. are both valid constructions.
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    (Original post by Y__)
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    It can't be the extra preposition: Martin lädt den Akku auf. / Der Akku wird aufgeladen. are both valid constructions.
    *smacks head* Duh, it's tacked onto the gerund. Will think on this.
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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    *smacks head* Duh, it's tacked onto the gerund. Will think on this.
    Actually, I guess it was me who was talking rubbish because technically, my sentence does have that 'critical' preposition but it doesn't have another one. Hmmm...

    Although I guess you could say:

    Spoiler:
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    Im Hafen wird ausgeladen. (short for Im Hafen werden die Schiffe entladen.) No too sure whether this is nice.


    edit: argh, edit yet again. I think I got something NOW, though.
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    (Original post by Y__)
    Actually, I guess it was me who was talking rubbish because technically, my sentence does have that 'critical' preposition but it doesn't have another one. Hmmm...

    Although I guess you could say:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Im Hafen wird entladen. (short for Im Hafen werden die Schiffe entladen.) No too sure whether this is nice.
    Well, I'm reading up on some german grammar, and seems it's just a passivization. The plot thickens...

    Right, I think I've roughly got it - things like kommt + an are particle verbs, with angekommen being the equivalent past participle.
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    (Original post by love_one)
    Wow! That sounds like a lot of work! :redface:
    So much more than I am doing now. I'm very lazy sometimes- don't know how I am going to cope!
    It is a lot of work, but you do get used to it and there is still plenty of time for other stuff.

    (Original post by love_one)
    Economists still have a lot of fun I hope?
    The ones at our college do, yes. But there is a stereotype that generally Economists spend all their time working. I don't know how true this is or if it's any different it reality from the other subjects.

    (Original post by love_one)
    Can't wait for the May Ball already :tongue:
    A bit early to be thinking about that, even our one seems a long way away to me! :tongue:
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    Emma's getting bad press for our May Ball theme
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Emma's getting bad press for our May Ball theme
    Which is?
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    It is a lot of work, but you do get used to it and there is still plenty of time for other stuff.


    The ones at our college do, yes. But there is a stereotype that generally Economists spend all their time working. I don't know how true this is or if it's any different it reality from the other subjects.


    A bit early to be thinking about that, even our one seems a long way away to me! :tongue:


    I posted a thread a few weeks ago about my fears that the nightlife/parties at Cambridge would be boring/ there wouldn't be much to do but everyone reassured me

    I am excited now really hope I meet my offer!


    Can't wait to start actually studying some detailed and interesting economics. I'm not a big fan about the way the A level is taught or the syllabus content.
    It's very methodical, not really much room for creative or independent thinking.
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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    Well, I'm reading up on some german grammar, and seems it's just a passivization. The plot thickens...

    Right, I think I've roughly got it - things like kommt + an are particle verbs, with angekommen being the equivalent past participle.
    I presume it's just that "angekommen" (just like "arrived") is - to steal some Latinate jargon - a perfect active participle, whereas most verbs have perfect passive participles. Still, it's interesting to think about...
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    (Original post by The West Wing)
    I decided not to go :rolleyes:
    I was referring to Soc Anth. I went to Politics :tongue:
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    I presume it's just that "angekommen" (just like "arrived") is - to steal some Latinate jargon - a perfect active participle, whereas most verbs have perfect passive participles. Still, it's interesting to think about...
    Hmm, maybe. I really ought to learn a V2 language properly at some stage.
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    (Original post by Scipio90)
    Which is?
    Empire. The Telegraph are complaining.
 
 
 

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