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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    Sure, under the vast majority of definitions, I just don't want to tar it in my mind by semantic association. I'm aware this makes me the odd one.
    i completely agree. i love table tennis, and somehow i feel that calling it a sport would make it a lot more off putting!
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    ok then, playing every so often for fun and it isnt a sport. Training 25 hours a week and having most of your non-academic life revolve around it and it is. Deal?
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    Yes, that's fine. It's basically a semantics argument, and for some purposes its good to call it a sport (such as funding and credibility and so on), whereas for others it isn't. (this is perhaps more marginal, but to attract people who might not like the idea of playing a "sport") I know it's common for people to say "let's not argue about semantics", but I study linguistics so that's part of what I do. Ultimately, the word "sport" will mean different things to each person, but I can see it being worthwhile to refer to it as a sport for some purposes.
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    Wow, hall was crap! The.....thing I ate could have converted me to vegetarianism.
    (Original post by jcb914)
    :ditto:

    I've got a bunch of articles to read and they are all online. I hate reading long passages off of a computer screen as it is, let alone the fact that I just get distracted and end up wasting time on other websites. Ugh. I wish I could just print them all out, but I'd probably get killed for being so environmentally unfriendly.

    Anyway, good luck!
    Thanks - you too!
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    I had sausages from the buttery today. I tried to eat them, they tasted like toothpaste. Then I had a look at the menu: "Lamb&Mint sausages". Who the hell puts mint into sausages? The British are weird :yep: .

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    I don't really agree with that, Supergrunch. I think sport is a defineable term with a widely held interpretation. Table tennis is certainly a sport! I absolutely love running around the garden when I visit my family in South Africa and randomly whacking a shuttlecock in the vague direction of the net with a badminton racquet, with free disdain for particularities such as the notion of 'out' - and generally 'playing for fun'. However I don't go as far as to say 'for me, badminton isn't sport' - which is clearly nonsense.

    Surprisingly chess is an official sport (at least in Germany according to my housemate)
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    I dont agree either supergrunch. Regardless of funding etc, we had sessions which were pretty much just working out to make sure we're fit to play, its really energetic, and at the end of a game (ie up to 11 points, not a whole match) you are knackered and sweating. There's also a lot of skill and technique involved, and to be good you have to train for many years. I had to train for a good 5 or 6 years to get a decent national ranking.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I don't really agree with that, Supergrunch. I think sport is a defineable term with a widely held interpretation. Table tennis is certainly a sport! I absolutely love running around the garden when I visit my family in South Africa and randomly whacking a shuttlecock in the vague direction of the net with a badminton racquet, with free disdain for particularities such as the notion of 'out' - and generally 'playing for fun'. However I don't go as far as to say 'for me, badminton isn't sport' - which is clearly nonsense.

    Surprisingly chess is an official sport (at least in Germany according to my housemate)
    Well, this is the sort of problem you run into when the standard linguistic view contrasts with the view of the public. Linguistics is descriptive, and as such describes the language used by native speakers. Hence as a native speaker of English, if I use the language in a particular way and think it's right, then it's correct - for me, anyway. I'm sure there are words that have different meanings for our personal dialects of the language (probably quite a lot, actually), so I don't see why the word "sport" shouldn't be one of those. Of course this contrasts with official definitions, where it's necessary to agree on what we're talking about so we can understand one another.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Silly person :p:

    Should have bought a sailing boat :yes:
    he's not skilled enough for sailing boats...speed boats is just like driving It has living quarters tooooooo....I'm gonna steal it and go cruising round the med :yep: So long as he lets me...
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    (Original post by Nina)
    I dont agree either supergrunch. Regardless of funding etc, we had sessions which were pretty much just working out to make sure we're fit to play, its really energetic, and at the end of a game (ie up to 11 points, not a whole match) you are knackered and sweating. There's also a lot of skill and technique involved, and to be good you have to train for many years. I had to train for a good 5 or 6 years to get a decent national ranking.
    Well, that's not what I meant by sport - I'm not trying to imply that it's not physcially and technically demanding, because up until now, I didn't think of such criteria at all when deciding what a sport was. Of course it's demanding, and I didn't mean to imply otherwise.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Wow, hall was crap! The.....thing I ate could have converted me to vegetarianism.

    Thanks - you too!
    You should have had gravy It takes out some of the flavour. Then again, I am feeling a little ill now...

    (Original post by Y__)
    I had sausages from the buttery today. I tried to eat them, they tasted like toothpaste. Then I had a look at the menu: "Lamb&Mint sausages". Who the hell puts mint into sausages? The British are weird :yep: .

    I'm not a great fan of mint I have to say. However, used sparingly it can really enhance a lamb roast. The problem comes when overenthusiastic chefs dump lots on, it's very strong.

    (Original post by Craghyrax)

    Surprisingly chess is an official sport (at least in Germany according to my housemate)
    Chess is a sport, darts is a sport, bellringing (arguably) is a sport. It is a flexible definition :p:
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    Arrrgh

    Sailing has been cancelled, worse luck, looks like it will snow = not good.

    This means that I have most of tomorrow to do work and so could have gone to the play tonight.

    I am so tempted to pack in the towel and go to bed. Which is really weird, because I only woke up 7 hours ago.
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    I want snoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooow
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    (Original post by Llamaaa)
    I want snoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooow
    I do not :hmpf:
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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    Well, this is the sort of problem you run into when the standard linguistic view contrasts with the view of the public. Linguistics is descriptive, and as such describes the language used by native speakers. Hence as a native speaker of English, if I use the language in a particular way and think it's right, then it's correct - for me, anyway. I'm sure there are words that have different meanings for our personal dialects of the language (probably quite a lot, actually), so I don't see why the word "sport" shouldn't be one of those. Of course this contrasts with official definitions, where it's necessary to agree on what we're talking about so we can understand one another.
    Yes, I understood the first time. My point is that 'sport' is a good example of a word that has a definition which pretty closely matches the personal interpretations English speakers draw from it.

    If you were to say that each word has a different meaning to its user, despite the broad guidelines of a shared linguistic framework, you would still have a heirarchy within that reality, of words which have high levels of consensus and strict definitions on one end and words with more variable interpretation on the other end.
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    I want snow!


    Everybody has to go see Tragedy Circus at 'Friends of Peterhouse Theatre', Peterhouse, 7:30pm tomorrow (Review in Varsity)
    It was hilarious!
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    I want snow! Unfortunately, being in maritime-climate Devon it ain't gonna happen Maybe if I go up on Dartmoor...
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    (Original post by Tom)
    I want snow! Unfortunately, being in maritime-climate Devon it ain't gonna happen Maybe if I go up on Dartmoor...
    Nope, sadly it doesn't snow in Devon If you go up on Dartmoor, however, you may well get some snow - Princetown is always a good bet. But with the general lack of snow in the South West, hence I'd quite like snow whilst I'm in Cambridge Where abouts in Devon are you, out of interest?
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    South Hams, village on the Yealm estuary. Which bit are you from?
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    Ooh, sounds lovely - I miss it much more than I thought I would. But then I do love Cambridge, so it's fine I'm from Plymouth (well, just outside, but essentially Plymouth )
 
 
 
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