Is is worth becoming a Clinical Psychologist/ working towards a DClin Psychology?

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linntib
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hey, so I have just finished my bachelors and I've always had this idea that I want to end up working within mental health, say become a clinical psychologist (maybe with a specialisation for children or forensics).

I've done quite a lot of networking, and the more clinical psychologists I speak to the more I realise there is 1) no guarantee you will get onto the doctorate program, 2) it will take years and years of no/ low income jobs to even get onto the program, and 3) fully qualified clinical psychologists still do not earn a lot.

I guess I am asking this as I do feel I am passionate about wanting to work in this career but at the same time, it feels unfair to go through so many years (maybe the next 10 years) of doing all this to then barely get paid and work crazy hours.
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(Original post by linntib)
hey, so I have just finished my bachelors and I've always had this idea that I want to end up working within mental health, say become a clinical psychologist (maybe with a specialisation for children or forensics).

I've done quite a lot of networking, and the more clinical psychologists I speak to the more I realise there is 1) no guarantee you will get onto the doctorate program, 2) it will take years and years of no/ low income jobs to even get onto the program, and 3) fully qualified clinical psychologists still do not earn a lot.

I guess I am asking this as I do feel I am passionate about wanting to work in this career but at the same time, it feels unfair to go through so many years (maybe the next 10 years) of doing all this to then barely get paid and work crazy hours.
Hello @linntib

Firstly, congratulations on completing your bachelors! And a further congratulations on the networking you’ve been doing, that is extremely helpful when it comes to the academic and working world.

Having doubts is natural and it may benefit you to do some research, look into other options and really decide whether or not a career in mental health and clinical psychology is something you’d really be content within, as pay and hours inevitably impacts your satisfaction.

Good luck!

Estelle
First Year Psychology Student
University of Huddersfield
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Nerol
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(Original post by linntib)
hey, so I have just finished my bachelors and I've always had this idea that I want to end up working within mental health, say become a clinical psychologist (maybe with a specialisation for children or forensics).

I've done quite a lot of networking, and the more clinical psychologists I speak to the more I realise there is 1) no guarantee you will get onto the doctorate program, 2) it will take years and years of no/ low income jobs to even get onto the program, and 3) fully qualified clinical psychologists still do not earn a lot.

I guess I am asking this as I do feel I am passionate about wanting to work in this career but at the same time, it feels unfair to go through so many years (maybe the next 10 years) of doing all this to then barely get paid and work crazy hours.
Hey!

So this is a career I have been working towards, and yes, I have spent a lot of years working my butt off and not earning much. If it is something you really want to do, though, I think it's worth it. As for the financial side of it, qualified Clinical Psychologists start on band 7, but can quickly move up to 8a and then higher depending on specialisations and years worked. Some people may supplement their salaries with private practice, including supervision, as well. Work-life balance can be good, too - I don't know of many psychologists who work weekends, for example.

I've trained as a counsellor alongside my psychology studies as I am also interested in psychotherapy and that has opened doors for me in terms of what jobs I can apply for (as well as having the opportunity to start in private practice if I wish).

If this is a career you are passionate about, go for it. Be prepared to work long and hard, but enjoy the journey!
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