Apprenticeship vs uni choice

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Umayrc63
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#1
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Hi I have got an offer of a apprenticeship as a network engineer in London.

I was excited about doing an apprenticeship rather than uni, because I can level up and get a degree and get paid at the same time. And can get a full time position at the end.

However, I have to wake up at 5am Mon-fri for essentialy around 4 years and come back home at 5pm
Now I am worried that I am missing out on uni life where I can have fun and not have to have a full time job, also uni is for a couple days a week.
The other route would be a Bsc in computer science

I am in a situation where I can't decide, what are other peoples opinions.
As it seems scary that in september I will be in a full time job and will be for a very long time. Whereas others would be in uni still in education and having fun, and not having to wake up at 5am every day haha.
Last edited by Umayrc63; 1 month ago
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Telomere
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#2
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#2
I'm a graduate and massively regret not taking the apprentice route. Much of uni life is oversold. You are paying a lot of money for a mixed bag of teaching (some good, some not so good, some terrible), overpriced accommodation, and will be saddled with debt for years to come. The social side is also a mixed bag. There were some great times but also an awful lot of mindless drinking out of sheer boredom and a fair amount of drinking / drugs where people are self-medicating their issues with stress, anxiety, depression etc. Looking back, I would take the apprenticeship in a heartbeat and use the income for great weekend / holidays or save it up for an amazing gap year after completing the apprenticeship - your employer would probably give you 12 months unpaid leave after completing the apprenticeship if you asked for it rather than lose the member of staff they've invested in.
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Zarek
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#3
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#3
The lack of debt and indeed earning is a huge plus, well worth considering. From what I’ve seen people doing degree apprenticeships can also have a lot of fun within a good organisation with lots of young people. If money is not tight though, follow your heart. Uni is a good experience too
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Umayrc63
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#4
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(Original post by Telomere)
I'm a graduate and massively regret not taking the apprentice route. Much of uni life is oversold.
(Original post by Zarek)
Uni is a good experience too
I'll be doing it from home.
But apart from the debt side and money is there any other huge disadvantage.
Because I will be working for the rest of my life, and it seems early and scary that I'm not doing anything else and just starting at 18.

And yes I agree that I can have fun in the apprenticeship. But I could get a job 3 years later. Study and have fun like I did in A level etc. Rather than just work 5 days, 45 hours, and essentially be out 12 hours on every weekday 5am-5pm,
And I don't want to regret it when I'm older and just working until 60 let's say. That I didn't just do a few years of uni and have less stress and not full time work
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artful_lounger
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Why would you need to get up at 5am? Is it not just a 9-5 role?
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Joinedup
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#6
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(Original post by Umayrc63)
I'll be doing it from home.
But apart from the debt side and money is there any other huge disadvantage.
Because I will be working for the rest of my life, and it seems early and scary that I'm not doing anything else and just starting at 18.

And yes I agree that I can have fun in the apprenticeship. But I could get a job 3 years later. Study and have fun like I did in A level etc. Rather than just work 5 days, 45 hours, and essentially be out 12 hours on every weekday 5am-5pm,
And I don't want to regret it when I'm older and just working until 60 let's say. That I didn't just do a few years of uni and have less stress and not full time work
A lot of people find uni quite stressful tbh. Uni sounds like its almost a relaxing holiday but thats not necessarily what it'll feel like.
Might be better off keeping yourself busy with some sort of meaningful work.
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Umayrc63
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#7
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Why would you need to get up at 5am? Is it not just a 9-5 role?
It's a 8-5 role
In london
I live outside and to get their by train I have to wake up at 5am to get the 6am train
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artful_lounger
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Umayrc63)
It's a 8-5 role
In london
I live outside and to get their by train I have to wake up at 5am to get the 6am train
I mean you'd probably need to look into relocating in that case, sooner or later. That kind of commute isn't sustainable long term!
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Umayrc63
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#9
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(Original post by Joinedup)
A lot of people find uni quite stressful tbh. Uni sounds like its almost a relaxing holiday but thats not necessarily what it'll feel like.
Might be better off keeping yourself busy with some sort of meaningful work.
I know uni will be tough. It won't be easy.
But it's still education and I will have that experience of going to uni and the uni life.

If I did go to uni, from research. Getting a good internship can land me a good job. The same way an apprenticeship does.
Doing uni means I have the experience of uni life and working a couple hours a day and having time for other things. However doing apprenticeship means that I don't have to pay for uni, but I will be full time working for the rest of my life.
Money is not really a issue for me going to uni, and I will be doing it from home anyway
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Umayrc63
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#10
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I mean you'd probably need to look into relocating in that case, sooner or later. That kind of commute isn't sustainable long term!
That's right. There's a possibility of moving in with family when I start.
But even then, its still full time work at 18 years old for the rest of my life. And not in education where it is "easier and can have more things to do in life than be stuck in a job"
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artful_lounger
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#11
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(Original post by Umayrc63)
That's right. There's a possibility of moving in with family when I start.
But even then, its still full time work at 18 years old for the rest of my life. And not in education where it is "easier and can have more things to do in life than be stuck in a job"
It's not for "the rest of your life". It's until the end of the apprenticeship, and then you can continue at the company or work elsewhere, or go to uni if you want.

Also if your idea of uni is that it's "easier and have more things to do than be stuck in a job" I would strongly suggest that's a very bad reason to choose to go to uni, even if you didn't have an apprenticeship offer. As more likely than not you won't make the most of that time there, and be potentially even less employable on graduation...
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Joinedup
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Yeah apprenticeship looks like more of a commitment but the likelihood is you'll get a job out of it... and if you don't like the job you can leave and do something else.
OTOH spend too long trying to keep your options open and you end up running out of road.

Working life is by no means all bad, you get to feel you're part of a real team working towards a real goal. it keeps you busy provides some of the structure and meaning to your life.

Not sure where you're getting the 5-5 work hours from, is that including commute or are you taking the extreme ends of a shift pattern?
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Umayrc63
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It's not for "the rest of your life". It's until the end of the apprenticeship, and then you can continue at the company or work elsewhere, or go to uni if you want.

Also if your idea of uni is that it's "easier and have more things to do than be stuck in a job" I would strongly suggest that's a very bad reason to choose to go to uni, even if you didn't have an apprenticeship offer. As more likely than not you won't make the most of that time there, and be potentially even less employable on graduation...
It is a level 4. And I want to have a degree so they said that I can do a level 6 after which is a degree anyway. Then have a full time position with them which I guessing I would be working for them a long time unless there was a issue with my job.

The reason I would go to uni is to have that uni life that people have, going to campus/lectures etc. And have that free time.
Rather than a full time job essentially starting an apprenticeship at 18
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Umayrc63
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#14
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(Original post by Joinedup)
Yeah apprenticeship looks like more of a commitment but the likelihood is you'll get a job out of it... and if you don't like the job you can leave and do something else.
OTOH spend too long trying to keep your options open and you end up running out of road.

Working life is by no means all bad, you get to feel you're part of a real team working towards a real goal. it keeps you busy provides some of the structure and meaning to your life.

Not sure where you're getting the 5-5 work hours from, is that including commute or are you taking the extreme ends of a shift pattern?
Job is 8-5pm
But as I live outside. I have to catch 6am train.
So have to wake up at 5am.
And getting back I'd be home at around 6:30
So more than a 12 hour day

There's possibility of staying over at relatives house.
But for now it's going there and back.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Umayrc63)
It is a level 4. And I want to have a degree so they said that I can do a level 6 after which is a degree anyway. Then have a full time position with them which I guessing I would be working for them a long time unless there was a issue with my job.

The reason I would go to uni is to have that uni life that people have, going to campus/lectures etc. And have that free time.
Rather than a full time job essentially starting an apprenticeship at 18
You aren't required to stay in a job forever...people leave their jobs for lots of reasons. They go to retrain in another field/area, they go for another job in the same area, they quit for all kinds of reasons. Your first job is not going to be your last job for most people....and people who work also have free time, and get to know people, etc.

You seem to have a naive view of how work and life actually play out as an adult. It's not a zero sum game, it's not a case of you get a job and never leave it unless you get fired. Uni isn't just a big doss of "school 2" where you go to "lessons" while drinking at night.
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Umayrc63
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You aren't required to stay in a job forever...people leave their jobs for lots of reasons. They go to retrain in another field/area, they go for another job in the same area, they quit for all kinds of reasons. Your first job is not going to be your last job for most people....and people who work also have free time, and get to know people, etc.

You seem to have a naive view of how work and life actually play out as an adult. It's not a zero sum game, it's not a case of you get a job and never leave it unless you get fired. Uni isn't just a big doss of "school 2" where you go to "lessons" while drinking at night.
I understand that I won't have the same job. I may leave the next year after the full position and go to another career path.
the averafe retiring age is 60, so essentially someone could work till their 60.
And doing an apprenticeship means that I'll start working 45 hours a week at 18. And not have that study/uni life and have less 'stress' in a way? and 'fun' with extra time.
Rather than have no time to do anything else in apprenticeship?
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Joinedup
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(Original post by Umayrc63)
Job is 8-5pm
But as I live outside. I have to catch 6am train.
So have to wake up at 5am.
And getting back I'd be home at around 6:30
So more than a 12 hour day

There's possibility of staying over at relatives house.
But for now it's going there and back.
That's a brutal commute IMO... but you'd be living on campus at uni?
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Umayrc63
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(Original post by Joinedup)
That's a brutal commute IMO... but you'd be living on campus at uni?
It is, however there's the chance i can move in with family.
But the point still remains of a full time job very young, when you will be working for the rest of your life anyway (why not life young life and enjoy it with more free time)

And uni I would be doing it from home, as its 1hour commute so easier. Plus don't have to wake up at 5am
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Chris2892
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(Original post by Umayrc63)
It is a level 4. And I want to have a degree so they said that I can do a level 6 after which is a degree anyway. Then have a full time position with them which I guessing I would be working for them a long time unless there was a issue with my job.

The reason I would go to uni is to have that uni life that people have, going to campus/lectures etc. And have that free time.
Rather than a full time job essentially starting an apprenticeship at 18
I did a degree apprenticeship.
You go to uni part time, but you can still join societies and make friends like any other full timer.

Only way you miss out is if you don’t have the initiative to go out and make friends. I know plenty of full timers who did that, never mind apprentices.

The only student experience I felt I missed out on was living off instant noodles and a bank overdraft.
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Umayrc63
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#20
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(Original post by Chris2892)
I did a degree apprenticeship.
You go to uni part time, but you can still join societies and make friends like any other full timer.

Only way you miss out is if you don’t have the initiative to go out and make friends. I know plenty of full timers who did that, never mind apprentices.

The only student experience I felt I missed out on was living off instant noodles and a bank overdraft.
The training is with a provider, so online work.

The main point is a full time job very young, when you will be working for the rest of your life anyway (why not live young life and enjoy it with more free time?) and not work 45 hours at 18, waking up at 5am. Rather going to uni and enjoying with less stress, and in education

What do you think
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