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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I haven't used them, I know there are decent 4 strokes around, but I've never found them to outperform two strokes enough to outweigh the disadvantages. Not being able to reverse effectively is a right pain in a rescue boat! Above about 5m I'd go for a 4 stroke every time, but below that there's a definite argument for two strokes in my opinion.
    The honda one i used was fine in reverse, as they are so much lighter than old 4 strokes. The main disadvantage is that they have to be stored upright, but then they are more reliable, in my experience! We used to have a 2 stroke rescue boat, that never worked, and when it did, it would cut out half way through rescuing someone, not particularly good. Our 4 stroke Honda just plodded on no matter what the weather! That was fine in reverse, although it did have a pretty sizeable transom.

    We rigged up a perspex sheet which extended above the transom by only about 90mm but it stopped a significant amount of splashback without impeding outboard travel.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    The honda one i used was fine in reverse, as they are so much lighter than old 4 strokes. The main disadvantage is that they have to be stored upright, but then they are more reliable, in my experience! We used to have a 2 stroke rescue boat, that never worked, and when it did, it would cut out half way through rescuing someone, not particularly good. Our 4 stroke Honda just plodded on no matter what the weather! That was fine in reverse, although it did have a pretty sizeable transom.

    We rigged up a perspex sheet which extended above the transom by only about 90mm but it stopped a significant amount of splashback without impeding outboard travel.
    They sound pretty good, or it might be that the boat was better designed with four strokes in mind - I've used several boats which were clearly designed to have less weight hanging off the transom and really suffered for it.
    I was on rescue duty the other day and the four stroke broke down - might have been something to do with someone treading on the tank connector!
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    (Original post by anna_spanner89)
    How can you work out how much fuel you will need for a certain trip?
    Easy counting, average small car = roughly £10 for every 100 mile. Do that, round it up and you'll have a rough idea. Alternatively, fill the car up, drive your miles and then fill it up again.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    They sound pretty good, or it might be that the boat was better designed with four strokes in mind - I've used several boats which were clearly designed to have less weight hanging off the transom and really suffered for it.
    I was on rescue duty the other day and the four stroke broke down - might have been something to do with someone treading on the tank connector!
    Whoops, did it break or just slip off?

    Yeh check out the new Honda 4 strokes, I was blown away by them, they are super light and give out a pretty hefty punch.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Whoops, did it break or just slip off?

    Yeh check out the new Honda 4 strokes, I was blown away by them, they are super light and give out a pretty hefty punch.
    Wasn't completely broken off, but it was damaged enough that it wasn't sealing onto the tank fitting properly and letting air into the fuel so wouldn't drop below a certain rev level without cutting out. Was a bit of a pain, luckily it wasn't really needed so I had to swap my boat then get the dud one back to shore!
    I'll have a look out for the Hondas, I don't buy engines though so I drive what's given to me! Got a feeling of course that the Hondas won't be cheap, they aren't normally!
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    No, but you always pay for quality!

    Ah so duck tape will fix that problem then?
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    Nah, someone else will fix that problem It's not really a duck tape job anyway - might work as a bodge, but needs a new fitting. Apart from anything it's leaking petrol all over the shop, and come to think of it petrol will probably dissolve the glue in duck tape - it's a pretty good solvent!
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    It took us months to replace our leaking fuel tank :p: We found that *shock horror* the fuel consuumption was considerably better after we had done so, and the cabin no longer stank of petrol. The engine still has terrible fuel consumption, but meh. It' my Dad's problem, not mine :p: I am learning such a lot from this boat.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Nah, someone else will fix that problem It's not really a duck tape job anyway - might work as a bodge, but needs a new fitting. Apart from anything it's leaking petrol all over the shop, and come to think of it petrol will probably dissolve the glue in duck tape - it's a pretty good solvent!

    Use more duck tape! :p:

    There is no job, big or small that duck tape, a hammer and a liberal amount of WD40 and swearing can't fix!

    Those fittings are dirt cheap tho, so would be silly not to replace it.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    It took us months to replace our leaking fuel tank :p: We found that *shock horror* the fuel consuumption was considerably better after we had done so, and the cabin no longer stank of petrol. The engine still has terrible fuel consumption, but meh. It' my Dad's problem, not mine :p: I am learning such a lot from this boat.
    Funny that!

    I am learning a shed load by playing with bikes atm, much more so than playing with cars tbh.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    There is no job, big or small that duck tape, a hammer and a liberal amount of WD40 and swearing can't fix!
    Apart from possibly my brother's Ka
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Apart from possibly my brother's Ka
    Did you try the BFH (Big Flipping Hammer?)
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    (Original post by SillyFencer)
    Easy counting, average small car = roughly £10 for every 100 mile. Do that, round it up and you'll have a rough idea. Alternatively, fill the car up, drive your miles and then fill it up again.
    thats a bit optomistic. £10 probely 80miles
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    (Original post by mr_cool)
    thats a bit optomistic. £10 probely 80miles
    Under 50 in my car, on short runs.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Did you try the BFH (Big Flipping Hammer?)
    Wouldn't have helped a lot, rust is the big problem. And brakes. And electrics. And it's about 150 miles away. The MOT fail list was over a page long!
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Wouldn't have helped a lot, rust is the big problem. And brakes. And electrics. And it's about 150 miles away. The MOT fail list was over a page long!
    Thats not a problem, that's a project :p:
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Thats not a problem, that's a project :p:
    It's a Ka. It's not worthy of being a project!
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    It's a Ka. It's not worthy of being a project!
    Oh right umm...scrappy!
 
 
 
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