Looking for advice on going back to uni

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Charlw100
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#1
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#1
Hi, I am wondering if I could get some advice on going back to university to study BSc Mathematics (ideally at the same university, which was City University).

Some background: I got into Maths in City in September 2015 with what is now 112 UCAS Tariff points (B in two A Levels - Maths and Sociology, E in Biology and C in Extended Project) on an unconditional offer (initially they wanted me to get an A in Maths but because the C4 exam that year was an absolute monster they let me in with a B). It went wrong because I was going through nasty bouts of anxiety and depression at the time and I ended up crashing out in 2019 (I resat year 1 and year 2 - the latter being a failure).

For the past 2 and a half years I have been working 25-30 hours in a restaurant and I've been pondering a lot recently about returning to university to get that Maths degree I failed to get a few years back. I do tend to have a rather mathematical brain so it was no easy loss and I am determined to try again, even if I have to start from scratch (which, to be honest, is probably the most ideal for me since my results from my year 1 resit weren't great).

I want to know if this is worth me pursuing again and how I can possibly go about this since obviously I'm not just coming out of sixth form like I was before.

Thanks for your time and sorry for the wall of text :dunce:
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dbhc2411
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#2
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#2
I think it's great that you're wondering about going back to university.

Similar to you, I dropped out after first year and I'm now returning 10 years later, I feel more ready now than I did then - I had a bit of a hole in my mind that I felt always needed to be filled!

So - it really depends on your situation.

Firstly, financial. Did you leave your course after your first year? If so, this will count towards your student finance application.

What that means is:

- Student Finance will cover you for your entire course plus an additional 'bonus' year (usually for people who make mistakes like you and me)
- If you did your first year and reapply now, you'll still usually be covered for your entire course, but you will have "used up" that 'bonus year'.

However, if you did second year funding may become a little more difficult, they may not cover your entire course.

For your application, you'll need to completely restart your UCAS application and put any details of previous study in your achievements. I would perhaps center your personal statement around what you've been doing to keep up with mathematics for sure. You'll also need some kind of education reference, if push comes to shove and you cannot get one, an employer reference should be fine - however an educational one is so much better.

Practical things you can do in the meantime is to go to some open days and talk to the Maths faculty about your situation, they'll give you a general idea whether your application would be welcomed and give you some practical advice. Also, you could ring some admissions teams at universities about your situations.

I wish you the best of luck, I cannot wait to go back this September!
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Charlw100
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#3
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#3
(Original post by dbhc2411)
I think it's great that you're wondering about going back to university.

Similar to you, I dropped out after first year and I'm now returning 10 years later, I feel more ready now than I did then - I had a bit of a hole in my mind that I felt always needed to be filled!

So - it really depends on your situation.

Firstly, financial. Did you leave your course after your first year? If so, this will count towards your student finance application.

What that means is:

- Student Finance will cover you for your entire course plus an additional 'bonus' year (usually for people who make mistakes like you and me)
- If you did your first year and reapply now, you'll still usually be covered for your entire course, but you will have "used up" that 'bonus year'.

However, if you did second year funding may become a little more difficult, they may not cover your entire course.

For your application, you'll need to completely restart your UCAS application and put any details of previous study in your achievements. I would perhaps center your personal statement around what you've been doing to keep up with mathematics for sure. You'll also need some kind of education reference, if push comes to shove and you cannot get one, an employer reference should be fine - however an educational one is so much better.

Practical things you can do in the meantime is to go to some open days and talk to the Maths faculty about your situation, they'll give you a general idea whether your application would be welcomed and give you some practical advice. Also, you could ring some admissions teams at universities about your situations.

I wish you the best of luck, I cannot wait to go back this September!
Hi, thanks for the advice - I just want to ask one more question. What steps can I take to keep up with mathematics? Would it be ideal for me to use practice A Level papers to refresh my knowledge?
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artful_lounger
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#4
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I think the most important thing to bear in mind is funding - if you've studied more than 1 year at uni full time before, you won't be eligible for full funding for a full-time degree course, unless you apply for compelling personal reasons (CPR) and it's accepted. Otherwise you would have one or more years you would only be eligible for a maintenance loan and not a tuition fee loan (and would need to self-fund the tuition fees).

However you can study part-time regardless of your prior studies as long as you didn't earn any qualifications. So you may want to look into part-time maths courses as well, and also speak with SFE about your entitlement and think about how this might affect your plans.
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dbhc2411
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Charlw100)
Hi, thanks for the advice - I just want to ask one more question. What steps can I take to keep up with mathematics? Would it be ideal for me to use practice A Level papers to refresh my knowledge?
May be useful! Read up on some of the newest research in Mathematics and you could mention any interests in what you've read in your PS
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Davidswift9
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Charlw100)
Hi, I am wondering if I could get some advice on going back to university to study BSc Mathematics (ideally at the same university, which was City University).

Some background: I got into Maths in City in September 2015 with what is now 112 UCAS Tariff points (B in two A Levels - Maths and Sociology, E in Biology and C in Extended Project) on an unconditional offer (initially they wanted me to get an A in Maths but because the C4 exam that year was an absolute monster they let me in with a B). It went wrong because I was going through nasty bouts of anxiety and depression at the time and I ended up crashing out in 2019 (I resat year 1 and year 2 - the latter being a failure).

For the past 2 and a half years I have been working 25-30 hours in a restaurant and I've been pondering a lot recently about returning to university to get that Maths degree I failed to get a few years back. I do tend to have a rather mathematical brain so it was no easy loss and I am determined to try again, even if I have to start from scratch (which, to be honest, is probably the most ideal for me since my results from my year 1 resit weren't great).

I want to know if this is worth me pursuing again and how I can possibly go about this since obviously I'm not just coming out of sixth form like I was before.

Thanks for your time and sorry for the wall of text :dunce:
It's worth it.

I finished my physics degree when I was 30. Fast forward 6 years later and I work in the space satellite industry in UK and I earn not far off six figure salary.

Having a STEM degree changes your life by bringing more opportunities. I went with Open University instead of going to a brick university when I finally realised I needed a degree to change my life. At that time I was bouncing from call centres and retail jobs and needed a salary but also to study full time so open uni was perfect for me.
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