University BSc degrees , what analytical software do you use ?

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AndrewLearning
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I heard my friends ( doing Accounting , Finance, Maths , Business study etc.....) , they said they need to use certain software to complete their coursework.

I only know how to use Excel , they mentioned something like SPSS , MatLab , Thomson Reutors .......... I am wondering what people are using in different universities.
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gjd800
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A load of my kids have to get good at R Studio really quickly.
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artful_lounger
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The unis will train you (in theory) how to use any relevant software. Exactly what you will use will depend on your uni, subject, and individual module requirements. Maths students will almost certainly spend at least some time using MATLAB. Your average business studies student will probably never see or hear of it.

Being proficient (or even just familiar with) Excel is sufficient to start with. I'd note the basic skills most people have in it will be less than you will develop in relevant courses in uni (whether you use that afterwards will depend a lot on your role though). I certainly only had the vaguest notion of the existence of pivot tables before I went to uni (and even now, despite getting good marks in my assignments at the time, still have no idea how to practically use them fortunately I don't have to, generally, in my current job).

Ultimately though software is just a tool, and you use different tools for different jobs. You wouldn't use MATLAB to do spreadsheet work because it's not spreadsheet software. You probably theoretically COULD but it'd be way more effort for no benefit. Likewise you probably couldn't easily use Excel to find numerical solutions to differential equations.
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AndrewLearning
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Thank you very much ! I will take a look into R Studio then

(Original post by gjd800)
A load of my kids have to get good at R Studio really quickly.
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AndrewLearning
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
The unis will train you (in theory) how to use any relevant software. Exactly what you will use will depend on your uni, subject, and individual module requirements. Maths students will almost certainly spend at least some time using MATLAB. Your average business studies student will probably never see or hear of it.

Being proficient (or even just familiar with) Excel is sufficient to start with. I'd note the basic skills most people have in it will be less than you will develop in relevant courses in uni (whether you use that afterwards will depend a lot on your role though). I certainly only had the vaguest notion of the existence of pivot tables before I went to uni (and even now, despite getting good marks in my assignments at the time, still have no idea how to practically use them fortunately I don't have to, generally, in my current job).

Ultimately though software is just a tool, and you use different tools for different jobs. You wouldn't use MATLAB to do spreadsheet work because it's not spreadsheet software. You probably theoretically COULD but it'd be way more effort for no benefit. Likewise you probably couldn't easily use Excel to find numerical solutions to differential equations.
I see , I have similar thoughts as well. I feel like sometimes "not knowing a software well" can have a big impact to exercise what we learn. That's why i am a bit worried and would like to know ahead what software we will be using , and then practice / learn beforehand ! Thanks , it's a relief that Excel can do most of the work
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sumossushibar77_
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Excel and STATA (Economics)
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AndrewLearning
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(Original post by sumossushibar77_)
Excel and STATA (Economics)
STATA ! Thank you so much !
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astronerd
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(Original post by gjd800)
A load of my kids have to get good at R Studio really quickly.
I do BSc Mathematics and can definitely confirm this is the case, especially if you do modules related to probability and statistics
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AndrewLearning
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(Original post by astronerd)
I do BSc Mathematics and can definitely confirm this is the case, especially if you do modules related to probability and statistics
Thanks a lot ! I can use this summer to get a head-start in learning the software
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