A-Level/Apprenticeship Doubts

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BlueyRaspberry
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
So I've just finished my GCSEs (yay) and I was certain that I wanted to do A-levels but now I'm not sure. The work we did on induction day seemed pretty hard and I think A-levels will be really stressful for me even if I do get good grades. I've recently found this amazing apprenticeship in the early years sector, and I'm considering applying but I've only got a month until the deadline. Anyone got any experience of making a sudden switch between the two? And did you regret it?
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ChicKevin
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#2
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#2
Hi there, I have just finished A-Levels and going to Uni on September.
I am sorry that this is going to be long winded, but I prefer typing all the things out on a single post rather into splitting them up.

I had never considered an apprenticeship when I was finishing 5th year.
However, I should suggest you to take your time and seriously considering your options.

People always say "Oh its completely fine to make a less good decision, with good will you can fix all things..."
Well, yes and no. 2 years might not seem that long, but it is a good amount of time especially when we are still young...
This is the golden age for us to attend education, no matter in what form (A-Levels or an apprenticeship).
Soon we will face responsibilities of adulthood - cost of living and so on - I don't want to rely my parents on that.
I have a single mom who works in a restaurant and my dad, a civil worker, retires on 2023...
So by that time I will be the one responsible of finance.
Ok enough of me being sentimental.

So, a few things I want to ask, as I want to help, but I need to understand you situation better first.
1) What do you want to be when you are older?
2) What subject do you have in mind of taking for A-Levels?
3) What apprenticeships are you interested in doing?

Finally, of course A-Levels is hard and stressful when you first look at them - because you haven't learn the stuff yet!
Once you learn them its not as hard as you think.
And, from a student perspective, I understand why we all think A-Levels are hard (including myself).
90% of the time is because of exam stress, which can be easily prevented, if you spend everyday afterschool wisely (literally like 30 min max recap for evert subject you do)
Schools do not put enough effort into teaching students the importance of forward planning and the fact that consistent small amounts of effort daily > Start revising only before exams - even 2 months in advance is no good for my case.
Because even if you had a good lesson one day and you understand the stuff taught, if you spend no own time solidifying the learnt stuff, those ain't gonna stay in your head. Only if you keep refreshing you mind about learn topics will those turn into long term memory - in this way, revising before exam is much easier, you are essentially just recapping and doing exam papers instead of having to basically relearn the things you've forgotten (as you left them untouched since last lesson)

Ah, crap, I have gone too far again...
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BlueyRaspberry
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by ChicKevin)
Hi there, I have just finished A-Levels and going to Uni on September.
I am sorry that this is going to be long winded, but I prefer typing all the things out on a single post rather into splitting them up.

I had never considered an apprenticeship when I was finishing 5th year.
However, I should suggest you to take your time and seriously considering your options.

People always say "Oh its completely fine to make a less good decision, with good will you can fix all things..."
Well, yes and no. 2 years might not seem that long, but it is a good amount of time especially when we are still young...
This is the golden age for us to attend education, no matter in what form (A-Levels or an apprenticeship).
Soon we will face responsibilities of adulthood - cost of living and so on - I don't want to rely my parents on that.
I have a single mom who works in a restaurant and my dad, a civil worker, retires on 2023...
So by that time I will be the one responsible of finance.
Ok enough of me being sentimental.

So, a few things I want to ask, as I want to help, but I need to understand you situation better first.
1) What do you want to be when you are older?
2) What subject do you have in mind of taking for A-Levels?
3) What apprenticeships are you interested in doing?

Finally, of course A-Levels is hard and stressful when you first look at them - because you haven't learn the stuff yet!
Once you learn them its not as hard as you think.
And, from a student perspective, I understand why we all think A-Levels are hard (including myself).
90% of the time is because of exam stress, which can be easily prevented, if you spend everyday afterschool wisely (literally like 30 min max recap for evert subject you do)
Schools do not put enough effort into teaching students the importance of forward planning and the fact that consistent small amounts of effort daily > Start revising only before exams - even 2 months in advance is no good for my case.
Because even if you had a good lesson one day and you understand the stuff taught, if you spend no own time solidifying the learnt stuff, those ain't gonna stay in your head. Only if you keep refreshing you mind about learn topics will those turn into long term memory - in this way, revising before exam is much easier, you are essentially just recapping and doing exam papers instead of having to basically relearn the things you've forgotten (as you left them untouched since last lesson)

Ah, crap, I have gone too far again...
Hi! Thanks for such an in-depth reply!
1) I am really indecisive but for a while I've been pretty set on going to Norland College and doing something with children, but I figured if I do A-levels I could always do a degree in law or psychology if I don't get in.
2) History, Psychology, Economics
3) I'm only really interested in doing an early years apprenticeship. The one that I saw was a role in a nursery as an apprentice early years practitioner.
Hope you're having a nice day.
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ChicKevin
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#4
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#4
(Original post by BlueyRaspberry)
Hi! Thanks for such an in-depth reply!
1) I am really indecisive but for a while I've been pretty set on going to Norland College and doing something with children, but I figured if I do A-levels I could always do a degree in law or psychology if I don't get in.
2) History, Psychology, Economics
3) I'm only really interested in doing an early years apprenticeship. The one that I saw was a role in a nursery as an apprentice early years practitioner.
Hope you're having a nice day.
I would say doing A-Levels will give you more flexibility in terms of career choice - you can always change your mind and maybe you would discover new interests that can influence your career.

An early years apprenticeship will give you time advantage over other people as you start learning about the career you chose much earlier. But it will be less flexible if you want to do something else.

In my case, I was very lucky to discover my passion and potential in design when doing my A-Levels. Before I was thinking about architecture or biology.

If you really like children (not in a weird way) sometimes following your heart leads to a better outcome. This is because not many people actually enjoy their job, and if you are doing something you really like for a living life could be much more enjoyable.

I would really recommend you proactively reaching out for opportunities yourself (most people simply wait for advice from parents or teachers). Try going to different career talks, or do some volunteering work helping children - these first person experience will certainly be more helpful than online research in helping you determine your career. I am actually doing the same - I am currently preparing for a portfolio and will soon reach out to different design companies for a potential internship (maybe even work for them for free).

Its good that you ask for help. Some other people would simply shy away from their problems.

Lets work hard to reach our goals!
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