Uni: Subjects for finance (Eco vs Physics)

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anewbow
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#1
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#1
Hi,

I have currently got an offer to study Physics. However, as I want to pursue a career in finance (accounting most likely), I was wondering if I should transfer to a more suitable course such as Economics or Finance. I have an interest in both subjects but I feel as if an Economics course would give me a better foundation on what jobs in finance could be like.

Any advice is appreciated, many thanks!!
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hallamstudents
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If you know what job you want (or the type of job) you would be better off choosing a course that can help you learn the fundamentals of the job, and that which will help you get into the job you want. Physics and finance are quite different, so if you know you don't want a job in physics at the end of the degree, you should find a course you like in Economics or Finance, as you can find courses with work experience, placements, ones with links to the industry etc, which would really help you in finding a suitable job and discovering what areas you really like or don't like in finance.

If you do want to change your course, you can do that through clearing now, through UCAS.

If you do decide to do the physics, then later on in the year decide you want to do a finance course, you could always transfer then. If you know now though that this is what you want, it would be better to do it now, so you don't have to catch up on modules and making bonds with your peers.

I hope this helps

- Rosie
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artful_lounger
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Finance roles don't care what you studied on the whole, although "finance" is a very vague term when applied to business contexts. I know people who did physics who went into actuarial science and data science for a major insurance firm for example (the former an undergrad, the latter a PhD). Note also economics has virtually nothing to do with the field of finance. Being an economist is not the same thing as being an analyst in an investment bank.

For something like accounting, investment banking, or management consulting, they don't care what your degree is in normally.For roles in risk, actuarial areas, and so on, a numerate degree is usually expected, which physics would be better for than the other named degrees. For quant finance itself usually a numerate PhD or at least masters is required, often with a computational bent, so physics is a perfectly suitable first degree to go onto an appropriate masters.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 month ago
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anewbow
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(Original post by hallamstudents)
If you know what job you want (or the type of job) you would be better off choosing a course that can help you learn the fundamentals of the job, and that which will help you get into the job you want. Physics and finance are quite different, so if you know you don't want a job in physics at the end of the degree, you should find a course you like in Economics or Finance, as you can find courses with work experience, placements, ones with links to the industry etc, which would really help you in finding a suitable job and discovering what areas you really like or don't like in finance.

If you do want to change your course, you can do that through clearing now, through UCAS.

If you do decide to do the physics, then later on in the year decide you want to do a finance course, you could always transfer then. If you know now though that this is what you want, it would be better to do it now, so you don't have to catch up on modules and making bonds with your peers.

I hope this helps

- Rosie
Helps a lot, thanks!
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anewbow
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(Original post by hallamstudents)
If you know what job you want (or the type of job) you would be better off choosing a course that can help you learn the fundamentals of the job, and that which will help you get into the job you want. Physics and finance are quite different, so if you know you don't want a job in physics at the end of the degree, you should find a course you like in Economics or Finance, as you can find courses with work experience, placements, ones with links to the industry etc, which would really help you in finding a suitable job and discovering what areas you really like or don't like in finance.

If you do want to change your course, you can do that through clearing now, through UCAS.

If you do decide to do the physics, then later on in the year decide you want to do a finance course, you could always transfer then. If you know now though that this is what you want, it would be better to do it now, so you don't have to catch up on modules and making bonds with your peers.

I hope this helps

- Rosie
Helps a lot, thanks!

(Original post by artful_lounger)
Finance roles don't care what you studied on the whole, although "finance" is a very vague term when applied to business contexts. I know people who did physics who went into actuarial science and data science for a major insurance firm for example (the former an undergrad, the latter a PhD). Note also economics has virtually nothing to do with the field of finance. Being an economist is not the same thing as being an analyst in an investment bank.

For something like accounting, investment banking, or management consulting, they don't care what your degree is in normally.For roles in risk, actuarial areas, and so on, a numerate degree is usually expected, which physics would be better for than the other named degrees. For quant finance itself usually a numerate PhD or at least masters is required, often with a computational bent, so physics is a perfectly suitable first degree to go onto an appropriate masters.
Understood, thanks
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gjd800
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I work with loads of Econ undergrads and they very often need to specialise via optional units if they want a grounding in finance, so I'm just mirroring what Artful said. Econ can be a very good, demanding degree choice - but you're not intrinsically better off in finance for having done it.
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CambPhilosophy
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I'm starting a finance grad scheme in September and I just finished my degree in natural sciences and philosophy. study what you love, you can go on to do finance with any degree, especially if it does involve mathematical content like physics does.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Finance roles don't care what you studied on the whole, although "finance" is a very vague term when applied to business contexts. I know people who did physics who went into actuarial science and data science for a major insurance firm for example (the former an undergrad, the latter a PhD). Note also economics has virtually nothing to do with the field of finance. Being an economist is not the same thing as being an analyst in an investment bank.

For something like accounting, investment banking, or management consulting, they don't care what your degree is in normally.For roles in risk, actuarial areas, and so on, a numerate degree is usually expected, which physics would be better for than the other named degrees. For quant finance itself usually a numerate PhD or at least masters is required, often with a computational bent, so physics is a perfectly suitable first degree to go onto an appropriate masters.
I'll quote the above as I couldn't put it better.

Physics may open some routes in either finance or accounting careers above those economics offers for areas which are looking for top line quant skills. If you prefer physics I'd definitely stick with it.
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