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I just passed my 12th ....wanted to pursue in law of I wanted to work In foreign company like Allen n overy should I study llb in diff country......could u pls help with what and where I should do llb ....
Original post by Aditispuranik
I just passed my 12th ....wanted to pursue in law of I wanted to work In foreign company like Allen n overy should I study llb in diff country......could u pls help with what and where I should do llb ....


Hi there

To be able to practice law in England, you will need to sit the Solicitors' Qualifying Examinations (SQEs) as does any student who completes a degree in England and Wales. You don't need to study law at the undergrad level. If you do a non-law degree, there is an option to do a GDL (law conversion course) before sitting the SQEs. It is not mandatory so again, you can just do a degree in your country and then sit the SQE in England (along with 2 years' Qualifying Work Experience) to practice as a solicitor in law firms like Allen and Overy. I decided to study law in the UK itself because you can apply for first-year schemes and vacation schemes which will increase your chances of getting a training contract with commercial firms and it's an amazing opportunity for you to explore the firms by actually visiting them and interacting with the people.

The legal system of England-Wales and Scotland-Northern Ireland runs differently so it's better to study in an English or Welsh university to be able to practice there without further hassles. There is no one university I can suggest to you, so you will really need to look at individual unis and find out what works best for you. I personally took the help of SIUK- it's a counselling agency and doesn't charge you for any services they offer. They can help you prepare a list of unis you could apply to and then you can use this flowchart to filter out which ones suit you better: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/diagrams/considerations-when-choosing-a-university

Durham is one of the top 7 law schools in the UK and the city has a beautiful history, which is why I decided to study law here. The faculty is pretty amazing and the support offered in terms of academia, mental health, careers etc is really helpful. There are law societies you can join and they host multiple events and workshops throughout your time here where you can interact with international firms' representatives. The collegiate system is peculiar to Durham where you get to mingle with students from all courses and nationalities, colleges also offer welfare and financial support. You have a wide array of activities to get involved in ranging from sports, music, theatre, dance, volunteering to DU exclusive internships to earn some money!

Let me know if you need more info :smile:

-Himieka (Official DU Rep)
(edited 1 year ago)

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