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Geography NEA help

So my investigation is about vegetation in the dune system.
I got 3 sub questions but I don't know how I can present the data for my 3rd sub-question which is 'Has the recent management at X maintained a range of seral stages? The management was creating a notch in order to make a difference at this overfixed dune system at X. I was thinking of taking photos and compare it to the normal dune system's seral stages but I don't know how should I be taking the photos, will I have to take photos separately at different dune stages (like at embryo dunes, foredunes, yellow dunes etc). If you have better idea on how I can gather and present the data, I would appreciate it...
If u would like more info, pls pm me...
Original post by Noob Master
So my investigation is about vegetation in the dune system.
I got 3 sub questions but I don't know how I can present the data for my 3rd sub-question which is 'Has the recent management at X maintained a range of seral stages? The management was creating a notch in order to make a difference at this overfixed dune system at X. I was thinking of taking photos and compare it to the normal dune system's seral stages but I don't know how should I be taking the photos, will I have to take photos separately at different dune stages (like at embryo dunes, foredunes, yellow dunes etc). If you have better idea on how I can gather and present the data, I would appreciate it...
If u would like more info, pls pm me...

I'm not doing a physical geography topic for my NEA, however, I believe I can help as some of my peers are doing coastal processes for their NEA.

So, you've said the recent management was creating a notch (potentially a wave-cut notch - I'm slightly unsure) however photos and comparisons are a good source of primary data. For photos, it is great to take them at different stages of the sand dunes and from different angles - I don't think they will expect a bird's eye view (you can use Google maps for the location).

Now, you've mentioned the question, 'Has the recent management at X maintained a range of seral stages?'. This is a yes or no question with extensive analysis. I would suggest getting some measurements - do a systematic sampling of the measurements across the dunes you're investigating and normal sand dunes. When doing this, you'll have some measurements and will have numbers so you can do a statistical test for your data presentation which can put your NEA above others.

Photos are crucial for your NEA, especially if you take them yourself - it proves that you're going out there yourself and getting your data and primary photos as opposed to photos off the internet. However, if you do use photos from the internet, be sure to cite them as references - you can use them in your introduction!

Now, you're a bit lost on doing more sampling. It seems you're looking at the sub-question and thinking you should only investigate 1 recent management plan - you can do multiple! Doing multiple will give you a huge base for comparison and allow you to compare each of the management strategies and evaluate whether or not they have maintained a range of serial stages or to what extent. Also, it depends on how long you think is recent - because for coastal management, not all of them are recent but some may have been recently maintained and you can use that for your sub-question.


You need to think about this in a more broad perspective rather than specific because your question and sub-questions need to be broad but specific as they could potentially have multiple answers. My suggestion is that you do a mind map for this sub-question and think about measurements, methods, (think about geology - you can use the Mohs Hardness Scale, callipers and assess if rock type had something to do with it!) and think about what the recent management strategies are (think 10-20 years from now to get a broad range!).


I hope this helps you. I'm not a physical geographer but I hope I've given you some guidance. :smile:
Original post by JA03
I'm not doing a physical geography topic for my NEA, however, I believe I can help as some of my peers are doing coastal processes for their NEA.

So, you've said the recent management was creating a notch (potentially a wave-cut notch - I'm slightly unsure) however photos and comparisons are a good source of primary data. For photos, it is great to take them at different stages of the sand dunes and from different angles - I don't think they will expect a bird's eye view (you can use Google maps for the location).

Now, you've mentioned the question, 'Has the recent management at X maintained a range of seral stages?'. This is a yes or no question with extensive analysis. I would suggest getting some measurements - do a systematic sampling of the measurements across the dunes you're investigating and normal sand dunes. When doing this, you'll have some measurements and will have numbers so you can do a statistical test for your data presentation which can put your NEA above others.

Photos are crucial for your NEA, especially if you take them yourself - it proves that you're going out there yourself and getting your data and primary photos as opposed to photos off the internet. However, if you do use photos from the internet, be sure to cite them as references - you can use them in your introduction!

Now, you're a bit lost on doing more sampling. It seems you're looking at the sub-question and thinking you should only investigate 1 recent management plan - you can do multiple! Doing multiple will give you a huge base for comparison and allow you to compare each of the management strategies and evaluate whether or not they have maintained a range of serial stages or to what extent. Also, it depends on how long you think is recent - because for coastal management, not all of them are recent but some may have been recently maintained and you can use that for your sub-question.


You need to think about this in a more broad perspective rather than specific because your question and sub-questions need to be broad but specific as they could potentially have multiple answers. My suggestion is that you do a mind map for this sub-question and think about measurements, methods, (think about geology - you can use the Mohs Hardness Scale, callipers and assess if rock type had something to do with it!) and think about what the recent management strategies are (think 10-20 years from now to get a broad range!).


I hope this helps you. I'm not a physical geographer but I hope I've given you some guidance. :smile:

Thanks for the well guided feedbacks, I will definitely consider this. I may ask more questions later on, but for now, I know what I am doing, thanks again!!

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