Stephanie223
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#1
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#1
Are you guys not anxious about the whole being a doctor thing. like studying for 10 years??? what?? i didn’t know it took that long to be one. i’ve already booked my ucat and everything and i’ve started studying too but i just want a medical career or a career i can do that require chemistry and biology and pays really good. or is there any ways to become to become a doctor quicker? i’m just so confused and i don’t have time. applications start soon and i don’t want to do the ucat for no reason.
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kaorimiyazono
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#2
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#2
1. Do you like studying science? Specifically the anatomy and physiology of the human body and how to diagnose and treat diseases? Are you willing to do loads of exams on this and memorise a lot of information?

2. Is your aim to become a doctor or just to work in science? Because there a LOT of other STEM based degrees and careers which you can do. I wanted to study medicine and become a doctor when I was younger because I wanted to work in a lab (pathology was interested in) but then realised that I could do a 3-4 year Biochemistry degree and go into research instead. This is something that suits me a lot more since my aim was always to work in a lab and I'm honestly not much of a people person lol.

3. Why do you want to become a doctor? Are you passionate about medicine? Do you want to help people? Is it what you're expected to do by anyone around you or is it something that you truly want for yourself? Are you fully committed to the degree and the job?

4. I'm assuming you're in year 12, so you still have summer to think it through and since you know you'll be applying to something science related (specifically bio and chem related), not knowing what degree you'll be applying for shouldn't stop you from starting your personal statement since anything you write will be relevant. Really think about what it is you want yo do with the rest of your life and have a read through different STEM degrees and careers. Don't make a rushed decision.

Good luck
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JA03
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Stephanie223)
Are you guys not anxious about the whole being a doctor thing. like studying for 10 years??? what?? i didn’t know it took that long to be one. i’ve already booked my ucat and everything and i’ve started studying too but i just want a medical career or a career i can do that require chemistry and biology and pays really good. or is there any ways to become to become a doctor quicker? i’m just so confused and i don’t have time. applications start soon and i don’t want to do the ucat for no reason.
Okay, calm down. If you're a UK student, this website will tell you the steps to being a doctor - it's not 10 years of studying, it is 5 years of studying and 5 years of training:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...raining-doctor

However, if the link takes too long, here's a summary:

5-year undergraduate medicine course (don't have to do postgrad if you done undergrad)
Then 2 years of training - you will start getting paid 1/3 into your second year when you choose a specialty.
Then you will complete 3-8 years of training. 3 years if you want to be a GP, 5-8 for other specialties.
Last edited by JA03; 1 month ago
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realtimme
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#4
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#4
It doesn’t take 10 years to become a doctor it takes 5 years of med school before you become a doctor then an extra (x) number of years before you become a consultant in a specialty - you start getting paid after you finish medical school
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jjrhb
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#5
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#5
hey so seems like you have not done enough research on what a medical career is like. If you want to be a doctor just for good pay I would highly recommend you consider other options, as without the passion for medicine you will most likely struggle a fair bit throughout medical school. There are many healthcare professions that pay well after a few years of working in that role, and you can specialise and get higher pay or enter a managerial position, such as in radiography, nursing or even ODPs etc (granted you probably won't earn over 50-60k but its still a good salary). You could also consider dentistry as it's less years (5-6 yrs of dental school and then you're pretty much set with all the knowledge you may need as a dentist and are qualified; there aren't foundation years like in medicine, where you are still supervised for a number of years so in a way it is more intense because in the 5 years of dental school you are expected to get straight into being a dentist whereas in medicine you are eased into it a bit more in your foundation years) . Most healthcare jobs require a science background so biology and/or chemistry will be required or at least be preferred subjects at a-level. Doing medicine is a massive commitment and will require a lot of patience and perseverance and you need to be really dedicated to your studies so make sure its something you really want to do. Please do not pursue medicine just for the money as you will most likely be disappointed as doctors are not paid enough compared to the hours they work and the amount of their life they dedicate to being a doctor. Hope that helped 😊
Good luck to whatever you may pursue
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TheMedicOwl
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Stephanie223)
Are you guys not anxious about the whole being a doctor thing. like studying for 10 years??? what?? i didn’t know it took that long to be one. i’ve already booked my ucat and everything and i’ve started studying too but i just want a medical career or a career i can do that require chemistry and biology and pays really good. or is there any ways to become to become a doctor quicker? i’m just so confused and i don’t have time. applications start soon and i don’t want to do the ucat for no reason.
Bear in mind that most of that training happens on the job. You'll be working as a doctor after five years of university. Five years isn't long in the grand scheme of things (even though it feels like it at eighteen)!

Have you done any work experience?
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Stephanie223
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#7
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#7
yes, i really like the idea of like medicine and dealing with patients and stuff. It’s not really about helping people apart from that i am really into like studying diseases, the human body but not in a scientific way like working in a lab but more like diagnosing and treating. I’m also really into psychology but it still takes a while to become a fully qualified psychologist. i just feel like i’ve come so far wanted to be a doctor that at this time right now it’s hard to go back, ive done work experience and built my whole educational goals around becoming a doctor. i have the ucat to sit, i’ve booked the test and everything but i just don’t want to study for that long, i like learning but to some extent if you know what i mean. maybe it’s because i’m still young and being hit with the real world so fast is a bit scary for me. i looked into becoming a nurse too but the pay is so low. i’m not doing it for the money, of course there are better options out there that pay more but within the whole “biochemistry” section it is medicine that pays the most
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Stephanie223
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#8
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#8
i hope it’s just a phase that i’m having but i’m scared that deep inside i’m not really committed to what my life as a student is going to become, i just don’t want to come this far and give up
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girl_in_black
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#9
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#9
Honestly? It's not worth it, don't do it. If you have what it takes to do medicine, you will have what it takes to do well in other careers. If I was 17 right now, I wouldn't do it again.
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ecolier
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Stephanie223)
yes, i really like the idea of like medicine and dealing with patients and stuff. It’s not really about helping people apart from that i am really into like studying diseases, the human body but not in a scientific way like working in a lab but more like diagnosing and treating. I’m also really into psychology but it still takes a while to become a fully qualified psychologist. i just feel like i’ve come so far wanted to be a doctor that at this time right now it’s hard to go back, ive done work experience and built my whole educational goals around becoming a doctor. i have the ucat to sit, i’ve booked the test and everything but i just don’t want to study for that long, i like learning but to some extent if you know what i mean. maybe it’s because i’m still young and being hit with the real world so fast is a bit scary for me. i looked into becoming a nurse too but the pay is so low. i’m not doing it for the money, of course there are better options out there that pay more but within the whole “biochemistry” section it is medicine that pays the most
(Original post by Stephanie223)
i hope it’s just a phase that i’m having but i’m scared that deep inside i’m not really committed to what my life as a student is going to become, i just don’t want to come this far and give up
As a doctor and an interviewer, virtually nothing you said here is a valid reason for wanting to be a doctor.

Just because you have already invested time and effort it doesn't mean anything... don't fall into the sunk cost fallacy.

P.S. You have to study a hell of a lot of more than 10 years. Becoming a doctor you'll have to study for life. I started med school in the mid 2000s, became a junior doctor in the early 2010s and have only become a consultant recently after countless exams, tough jobs etc. (I didn't even take a gap year throughout) As @girl_in_black says, you have to be dedicated to succeed.
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artful_lounger
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#11
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#11
The degree itself is 5-6 years, but the last 2-3 years of that are primarily spent on clinical placement and so it's not quite the same as studying in a degree usually. After that you'll be working as a junior doctor. Yes, you'll be in training, but you will still be doing the job. You'll just be training towards some particular specialism after the foundation programme.

Note the aforementioned suggestion that it takes 5 years of postgraduate training to become a doctor is not correct in all cases. This is the minimum if you specialise in GP maybe pathology or radiology or something (2 years foundation, 3 years specialty/GP training - although I think pathology and radiology may be 4 or 5 years anyway). Most specialties have longer training periods, although the exact length can vary depending on specialty (most surgical specialties take 8 years after foundation, so 10 years after the medical degree, and 15-16 in total).

But again, you will be working as a doctor that whole time after medical school. You don't suddenly become a doctor when you get your CCT - you're a doctor from as soon as you get full registration at the end of FY1 as I understand it (and are provisionally registered during FY1). It's just that once you get your CCT then you can become a consultant. And as noted, you're getting paid from when you finish medical school onwards (with also a clockwork salary progression - not many jobs can boast that!).

So it's not 10+ years of school style study, or even uni style study. It's about 3 years of uni style study, 3 years of placements in uni, then the rest is working as a doctor (while still having to study and take some exams along the way outside of your work, depending on your specialty). It's unhelpful and inaccurate to think of it as that. Yes you have to study, but it's not sitting in a classroom/lecture theatre for 10 consecutive years!
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Turning_A_Corner
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Stephanie223)
yes, i really like the idea of like medicine and dealing with patients and stuff. It’s not really about helping people apart from that i am really into like studying diseases, the human body but not in a scientific way like working in a lab but more like diagnosing and treating. I’m also really into psychology but it still takes a while to become a fully qualified psychologist. i just feel like i’ve come so far wanted to be a doctor that at this time right now it’s hard to go back, ive done work experience and built my whole educational goals around becoming a doctor. i have the ucat to sit, i’ve booked the test and everything but i just don’t want to study for that long, i like learning but to some extent if you know what i mean. maybe it’s because i’m still young and being hit with the real world so fast is a bit scary for me. i looked into becoming a nurse too but the pay is so low. i’m not doing it for the money, of course there are better options out there that pay more but within the whole “biochemistry” section it is medicine that pays the most
I think you are doing it for the money personally. Everyone does and the fact you discounted nursing due to the low pay suggests that money is definitely a factor in your decision making.
You don’t mention any AHPs apart from psychology and that makes me wonder again if you’re attracted to the higher paying careers and the prestige factor. Again, nothing wrong with those, but it may be blinkering you to other professions with healthcare. Have a look at the AHP and bear in mind that private practice can triple many AHPs’ earning potential, especially in physio and SLT, but also in OT. There may be some additional AHP roles or things like PA where you might find more of a balance between work and study.
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bunbunbun
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
I think you are doing it for the money personally. Everyone does and the fact you discounted nursing due to the low pay suggests that money is definitely a factor in your decision making.
You don’t mention any AHPs apart from psychology and that makes me wonder again if you’re attracted to the higher paying careers and the prestige factor. Again, nothing wrong with those, but it may be blinkering you to other professions with healthcare. Have a look at the AHP and bear in mind that private practice can triple many AHPs’ earning potential, especially in physio and SLT, but also in OT. There may be some additional AHP roles or things like PA where you might find more of a balance between work and study.
I just want to add that alongside AHP there is the possibility of the NHS scientist training pathway if OP is interested in biochemistry but not medicine. It's competitive but if you're interested in a STEM career that involves working with people it may be an option. NHS scientists are often part of the multidisciplinary team involved in a patient's care and can play a substantial role in the diagnosing/treatment due to the specialised knowledge you would possess. Bear in mind however that the NHS scientist training pathway is only available for graduates and specific pathways require specific undergraduate degrees.

Also, I would agree OP that medicine may not be the best route for you. Obviously we don't know you but having an interest in a high wage and the pathology of diseases isn't enough of a motivation to pursue medicine, IMO. They're not bad interests, at all, just not suited to medicine. Medicine is a huge commitment and if you're having serious reservations, and can't really pinpoint why you wan't to pursue it then I'd honestly look into other avenues. If you like the idea of a clinical job, there is a wide, wide variety of roles within the healthcare sector that have varying levels of patient contact and required studying.

Additionally, be kind to yourself. It's okay to have spent all this time believing you'll study medicine only for you to now realise it might not be for you. Choosing a career is a big, often difficult decision and isn't as straightforward as many people make it out to be. You may feel that you've wasted your time planning to do medicine but was it a waste if it's helped you understand what you don't want to do? Sometimes thinking about what we do want to do can be easier if we think about what we don't want to do.

Hopefully that makes sense and is useful to you OP.
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JA03
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#14
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#14
(Original post by bunbunbun)
I just want to add that alongside AHP there is the possibility of the NHS scientist training pathway if OP is interested in biochemistry but not medicine. It's competitive but if you're interested in a STEM career that involves working with people it may be an option. NHS scientists are often part of the multidisciplinary team involved in a patient's care and can play a substantial role in the diagnosing/treatment due to the specialised knowledge you would possess. Bear in mind however that the NHS scientist training pathway is only available for graduates and specific pathways require specific undergraduate degrees.

Also, I would agree OP that medicine may not be the best route for you. Obviously we don't know you but having an interest in a high wage and the pathology of diseases isn't enough of a motivation to pursue medicine, IMO. They're not bad interests, at all, just not suited to medicine. Medicine is a huge commitment and if you're having serious reservations, and can't really pinpoint why you wan't to pursue it then I'd honestly look into other avenues. If you like the idea of a clinical job, there is a wide, wide variety of roles within the healthcare sector that have varying levels of patient contact and required studying.

Additionally, be kind to yourself. It's okay to have spent all this time believing you'll study medicine only for you to now realise it might not be for you. Choosing a career is a big, often difficult decision and isn't as straightforward as many people make it out to be. You may feel that you've wasted your time planning to do medicine but was it a waste if it's helped you understand what you don't want to do? Sometimes thinking about what we do want to do can be easier if we think about what we don't want to do.

Hopefully that makes sense and is useful to you OP.
Adding onto this - pathology of diseases is more in the biomedical science field, it may be a better choice for you as it's only a 3 year course (some universities have sandwich years where you do a year in industry) to get a BSc in Biomedical Science, you can work for a few years then apply for the STP to become a clinical scientist if you want.
There is an alternative to the STP and that is the PTP which is a great alternative to doing a regular university course! (It is still a university course however I feel it's less known). This website gives you more information about the PTP:
https://nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/programmes/...ptp-programme/
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asif007
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Stephanie223)
Are you guys not anxious about the whole being a doctor thing. like studying for 10 years??? what?? i didn’t know it took that long to be one. i’ve already booked my ucat and everything and i’ve started studying too but i just want a medical career or a career i can do that require chemistry and biology and pays really good. or is there any ways to become to become a doctor quicker? i’m just so confused and i don’t have time. applications start soon and i don’t want to do the ucat for no reason.
Panic and anxiety will distract you from putting the work in to succeed at getting into medical school, becoming a doctor, whatever stage you're at. You need to get your mindset in order first because it sounds to me like you're all over the place and you haven't decided properly what you want to do yet. Do you want to do a shorter degree, in and out in 3 years, and go into a job that is perhaps less well-paid than being a doctor? Or will you accept the challenge of getting into medical school and then getting through the exams? I've seen a lot of young ladies in my life who liked the idea of the money and prestige of being a doctor, but didn't want to commit to a longer degree and specialty training (or they couldn't be asked, who knows). They prioritised other things like earning an income earlier so they could settle down, get married earlier and move into their own homes. All valid considerations for young women thinking about becoming doctors.

There are plenty of careers you can go into with Biology and Chemistry, but not all of them will be paid as well as doctors. A few of them may be equally or better paid if you do a Masters but the majority of them are probably much less. I agree with others above me that money is a big consideration for you. If you want money, you have to work harder and longer for it. Well-paid jobs don't come easily - the reason doctors are well-paid is because the job is hard and highly skilled with long hours involved. Some people would dispute that doctors are well-paid, but money and job security are still the primary reasons why Medicine remains so competitive in the UK. I think it's time you do some soul searching, ask yourself what you really want from a career and what you are prepared to do to achieve it. If you're being pressured into it by other people, perhaps family, it's time to step up and challenge that. I've seen a lot of people drift into Medicine when they preferred to do something else, because they were pressured into it. Especially British Asians.

I don't want to sound patronising because I hate when people gloat and brag about how hard they have worked (and I can see somebody's already been doing that here, lol). But being a doctor is hard work, and you have to be dedicated from day 1. IMO it's hard enough to get into medical school but it's even harder to make it through the degree, graduate in one piece and then start working as a doctor. You have to want it, and you have to be driven.
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Turning_A_Corner
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#16
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#16
(Original post by asif007)
Panic and anxiety will distract you from putting the work in to succeed at getting into medical school, becoming a doctor, whatever stage you're at. You need to get your mindset in order first because it sounds to me like you're all over the place and you haven't decided properly what you want to do yet. Do you want to do a shorter degree, in and out in 3 years, and go into a job that is perhaps less well-paid than being a doctor? Or will you accept the challenge of getting into medical school and then getting through the exams? I've seen a lot of young ladies in my life who liked the idea of the money and prestige of being a doctor, but didn't want to commit to a longer degree and specialty training (or they couldn't be asked, who knows). They prioritised other things like earning an income earlier so they could settle down, get married earlier and move into their own homes. All valid considerations for young women thinking about becoming doctors.

There are plenty of careers you can go into with Biology and Chemistry, but not all of them will be paid as well as doctors. A few of them may be equally or better paid if you do a Masters but the majority of them are probably much less. I agree with others above me that money is a big consideration for you. If you want money, you have to work harder and longer for it. Well-paid jobs don't come easily - the reason doctors are well-paid is because the job is hard and highly skilled with long hours involved. Some people would dispute that doctors are well-paid, but money and job security are still the primary reasons why Medicine remains so competitive in the UK. I think it's time you do some soul searching, ask yourself what you really want from a career and what you are prepared to do to achieve it. If you're being pressured into it by other people, perhaps family, it's time to step up and challenge that. I've seen a lot of people drift into Medicine when they preferred to do something else, because they were pressured into it. Especially British Asians.

I don't want to sound patronising because I hate when people gloat and brag about how hard they have worked (and I can see somebody's already been doing that here, lol). But being a doctor is hard work, and you have to be dedicated from day 1. IMO it's hard enough to get into medical school but it's even harder to make it through the degree, graduate in one piece and then start working as a doctor. You have to want it, and you have to be driven.
I think you missed people with disabilities off your list of people to offend. Don’t leave us out.
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asif007
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
I think you missed people with disabilities off your list of people to offend. Don’t leave us out.
Don't clutch at straws with your attempt to put words in my mouth. Not a single word of what I've written can possibly be offensive to anyone. If my comments annoy you for whatever reason, that's your problem and yours alone.

FYI, I repped one of your earlier posts and I wasn't referring to you in my comments. Have a nice weekend.
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artful_lounger
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
I think you missed people with disabilities off your list of people to offend. Don’t leave us out.
Anxiety is classed as a disability under the equality act if it has a long term effect on the persons ability to function day to day, so don't worry they got that too :rolleyes:
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TheMedicOwl
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#19
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#19
(Original post by asif007)
Don't clutch at straws with your attempt to put words in my mouth. Not a single word of what I've written can possibly be offensive to anyone. If my comments annoy you for whatever reason, that's your problem and yours alone.

FYI, I repped one of your earlier posts and I wasn't referring to you in my comments. Have a nice weekend.
I'm 35, so no longer qualify as a "young lady". I get married next month. I start medical school the month after that. I've already got my own house (which I bought by myself, and without having to show a marriage certificate). This idea that going to med school will interfere with a woman's chances of marriage and having their own home is quite dated, to say the least. At best it's rooted in a set of very specific cultural norms, and there is no indication that those norms are shared by the OP. She doesn't say anything about wanting to be married young, or believing that she can't have a home of her own without a husband. Some women will find these presumptions offensive. To others they'll just be frustrating. Lots of 17-year-olds are daunted by the thought of a 5 - 6 year degree programme (naturally enough, as it represents a third of their life to date) and lots of them are uncertain about what they want to do in life long-term. It's possible to give advice without jumping to the conclusion that the teenage OP must be worrying about her marriage prospects.
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Turning_A_Corner
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#20
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#20
(Original post by asif007)
Don't clutch at straws with your attempt to put words in my mouth. Not a single word of what I've written can possibly be offensive to anyone. If my comments annoy you for whatever reason, that's your problem and yours alone.

FYI, I repped one of your earlier posts and I wasn't referring to you in my comments. Have a nice weekend.
I don’t mean to therefore I don’t. Brilliant logic.
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