I want to become a nurse but don't want to wipe bums? Is this avoidable?

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Catlover43
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#1
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#1
I have taken an interest to child nursing, and it is a career which I wish to pursue (I understand I need a degree). However, do I absolutely HAVE to wipe bums and clean poo? Is this avoidable in any way at all? I really don't want to do this, it disgusts me and it will make me feel sick so I would struggle to do something like this because I have a weak stomach for this. I don't mind if it's a baby, but I will probably vomit if it's an adult. Is there any way at all I can avoid doing this and give this task to someone else to do instead? I really want to become a child's nurse but this is one thing that is really putting me off
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potentialsimp
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Honestly, if you think a standard human poo is the worst thing you will see as a nurse, I suggest you dismiss the medical or caring professions as potential careers.
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Spelunker
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human poo is not the worst thing you will encounter in nursing. blood, pus, vomit, physical and verbal abuse from patients, dressing infected wounds which smell like death all happening on long long shifts. you wont be able to avoid it all.
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Son of the Sea
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Nursing really isn’t for you then I’m afraid. You have to deal with things like that. For example, you could get called to shower a grandad and have him explode diarrhoea all down your arm in the process. Or you might have to pack gauze in a woman’s torn vagina after a difficult birth that’ll be oozing tonnes of blood and other discharge. Loads of gruesome stuff involved.
Last edited by Son of the Sea; 4 weeks ago
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Catlover43
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(Original post by Son of the Sea)
Nursing really isn’t for you then I’m afraid. You have to deal with things like that. For example, you could get called to shower a grandad and have him explode diarrhoea all down your arm in the process. Or you might have to pack gauze in a woman’s torn vagina after a difficult birth that’ll be oozing tonnes of blood and other discharge. Loads of gruesome stuff involved.
But I'm thinking of child nursing, so surely it can't include all those things you mentioned? Wouldn't it be the responsibility of someone who has specialised in adult nursing (or midwifery for your second scenario)
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Son of the Sea
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(Original post by Catlover43)
But I'm thinking of child nursing, so surely it can't include all those things you mentioned? Wouldn't it be the responsibility of someone who has specialised in adult nursing (or midwifery for your second scenario)
I guess although I don’t know whether you’d have to try it all before you specialise. In any case, children vomit, crap and p!ss loads, more than adults actually. So yes, you’ll have to wipe poo and be prepared to have vomit all over you on a near daily basis.
Last edited by Son of the Sea; 4 weeks ago
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iL1L
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I think you need to be prepared for anything unpleasant to happen, really.
Did you have a particular place of interest to go to to study? People with experience are probably more able to answer that than many of us on here
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Catlover43)
But I'm thinking of child nursing, so surely it can't include all those things you mentioned? Wouldn't it be the responsibility of someone who has specialised in adult nursing (or midwifery for your second scenario)
Children are at least 100x more unhygienic than adults so I would have thought it even harder to avoid bodily fluids.
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Catlover43)
I have taken an interest to child nursing, and it is a career which I wish to pursue (I understand I need a degree). However, do I absolutely HAVE to wipe bums and clean poo? Is this avoidable in any way at all? I really don't want to do this, it disgusts me and it will make me feel sick so I would struggle to do something like this because I have a weak stomach for this. I don't mind if it's a baby, but I will probably vomit if it's an adult. Is there any way at all I can avoid doing this and give this task to someone else to do instead? I really want to become a child's nurse but this is one thing that is really putting me off
Emily_B
So you wish to do children's nursing but you don't want to clean any dirty bums etc which is part of the job.

Children's nursing contains the same sort of work as a adult nurse does - ie where necessary clean up any mess that is made by the child, fed them if unable to do so themselves,
What do you think happen when the child mess there bed with toilet stuff - you are the one who clean it up.

Don't you think that children don't have diarrhoea and other issues with their toiletry ....??
Children being Sick over your uniform is probably worse than cleaning up the poo etc as you are at least wearing gloves when you are doing this unlike if there are suddenly Sick over you while talking to them.
You need to be prepared for anything that comes your way as a student nurse as well as a qualified nurse.

I have unfortunately experienced this as a student midwife never mind as a registered midwife as still have to deal with babies after they have been born.

A NHS registered midwife
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Children are at least 100x more unhygienic than adults so I would have thought it even harder to avoid bodily fluids.
That's is true that it's harder to avoid anything as a children nurse.
I know what it's like for bodily fluids going on you no matter how careful you are doing your job.
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StriderHort
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No much use for a nurse that's scared of the human body and not willing to work on it imo
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Catlover43)
But I'm thinking of child nursing, so surely it can't include all those things you mentioned? Wouldn't it be the responsibility of someone who has specialised in adult nursing (or midwifery for your second scenario)
I'd have thought you'd be more likely to come across that than less likely!

You could become a doctor instead and then if it happens you'd presumably just call for a nurse or HCA to help? :x

(although "goo" of various forms is inevitably in healthcare professions unless you become a radiologist or something!)
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Rara345
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I'd have thought you'd be more likely to come across that than less likely!

You could become a doctor instead and then if it happens you'd presumably just call for a nurse or HCA to help? :x

(although "goo" of various forms is inevitably in healthcare professions unless you become a radiologist or something!)
I would say radiologists do too, on my work experience I shadowed a radiologist for an afternoon and they did lots of biopsies of queried tumours- “goo” was present :P
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Rara345)
I would say radiologists do too, on my work experience I shadowed a radiologist for an afternoon and they did lots of biopsies of queried tumours- “goo” was present :P
I thought it was pathologists who biopsy things :confused: aren't radiologists the ones who do the imaging?
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Rara345
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I thought it was pathologists who biopsy things :confused: aren't radiologists the ones who do the imaging?
When I was there, it was a radiologist doing some needle biopsies whilst doing an ultrasound of lumps. So they used the ultrasound to guide the needle and then biopsied it. Idk if that’s how they normally do it.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Rara345)
When I was there, it was a radiologist doing some needle biopsies whilst doing an ultrasound of lumps. So they used the ultrasound to guide the needle and then biopsied it. Idk if that’s how they normally do it.
Oh that's interesting! I guess it was some kind of interventional radiology thing? I never really knew what interventional radiologists do specifically except apparently treat embolisms or something I think
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Mintkoala
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(Original post by Catlover43)
But I'm thinking of child nursing, so surely it can't include all those things you mentioned? Wouldn't it be the responsibility of someone who has specialised in adult nursing (or midwifery for your second scenario)
You know children’s nursing goes up to 17 years old right? Especially at uni where you get absolutely no say in the placements you get sent to and the ages you will be looking after.

It won’t just be poo, but wee, blood, vomit, mucous, often more than one at a time, multiple times a day. People and children of all ages have the same bodily fluids, not just patients on adult wards.

As the registered nurse you will be legally accountable for the care of the patients, and if you miss something by giving all all the jobs you don’t like to healthcare assistants or students, and you miss something, that’s your professional registration on the line, potentially not ever being able to work as a nurse again. It would be your job to look at, know about and clean up coffee ground vomit, large amounts of poo and all the rest of it. Not doing so can jeopardise patient care, as it is highly likely these things will be symptoms of something else, and you will be the qualified one who should be noticing this.

Nursing is a team effort, if you’re known as the one who won’t do this and won’t do that, especially when the other staff are struggling with their workload (which is a lot of the time), you will be picked up on it by management and that’s not a road you want to go down.

If a patient throws up while you’re administering medication, or another nursing-specific role, it’s going to upset the patient, their family and the other staff if you say, “Oh let me go and grab someone else to clean you up because I don’t do that”, plus you don’t know how long they’ll be waiting either. You’re the nurse there, that’s your job. It’s your job to do it even when it doesn’t happen right in front of you. If a patient needs the toilet, commode, bedpan or has already soiled themselves and there’s no healthcare assistant or student available (even if there is you should be doing it lot anyway) and you’re free and you don’t help them, you’re failing to provide the care and dignity to your patients which they are entitled to receive, and that’s your job to give them these things.

Also as a student nurse you will be formally assessed multiple times by registered nurses on giving personal care and cleaning up bodily fluids, and you can’t pass the degree without passing those. When you’re not being assessed you are expected to do these things very regularly when you are on your placements.
Last edited by Mintkoala; 4 weeks ago
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Rara345
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Oh that's interesting! I guess it was some kind of interventional radiology thing? I never really knew what interventional radiologists do specifically except apparently treat embolisms or something I think
I have no idea haven’t heard of that haha, he just introduced himself as a radiologist.
They were mainly queried cancers so I’m not sure they were embolisms but either way I agree, goo is inevitable in healthcare! (I just pointed out my experience to show even in specialties where it’s not considered to have it!)
Last edited by Rara345; 4 weeks ago
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Mintkoala)
You know children’s nursing goes up to 17 years old right? Especially at uni where you get absolutely no say in the placements you get sent to and the ages you will be looking after.

As someone who has worked on wards of all ages, I know how many bodily fluids you will come into contact with. Not just poo, but wee, blood, vomit, mucous, often more than one at a time, multiple times a day. People of all ages have the same bodily fluids, not just patients on adult wards.

As the registered nurse you will be legally accountable for the care of the patients, and if you miss something by giving all all the jobs you don’t like to healthcare assistants or students, and you miss something, that’s your professional registration on the line, potentially not ever being able to work as a nurse again. It would be your job to look at, know about and clean up coffee ground vomit and all the rest of it. Not doing so can jeopardise patient care, as it is highly likely these things will be symptoms of something else, and you will be the qualified one who should be noticing this.

Nursing is a team effort, if you’re known as the one who won’t do this and won’t do that, especially when the other staff are struggling with their workload, you will be picked up on it by management and that’s not a road you want to go down.

If a patient throws up while you’re administering medication, or another nursing-specific role, it’s going to upset the patient, their family and the other staff if you say, “Oh let me go and grab someone else to clean you up because I don’t do that”, plus you don’t know how long they’ll be waiting either. You’re the nurse there, that’s your job.
That's true that you are the responsibie registered nurse looking after the patient while in your care.
Certainly don't want to go down the road of being stuck off as a nurse because of not capable of doing the job that they are trained to do ☺️ or being pulled up in front of management about things.



Lot's of good valid points you have said to the OP. Hopefully they will take everything on board what been said before making a decision about doing nursing as a career.

If they can't do those tasks as a student nurse then I wouldn't recommend nursing as a career.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Rara345)
I have no idea haven’t heard of that haha, he just introduced himself as a radiologist.
They were mainly queried cancers so I’m not sure they were embolisms but either way I agree, goo is inevitable in healthcare! (I just pointed out my experience to show even in specialties where it’s not considered to have it!)
Yes that's a good point!
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