The Student Room Group

What aspects of Geography are the most important for pupils to learn?

Love it or hate it, we’ll all end up studying geography at some point in our lives - so what are the key topics we should learn about?

Is it more important to learn about globalisation and inequalities/insecurities around the world, or should we focus on global warming and the effects of climate change?

Anything you wish you did/didn’t learn at school? :smile:

More curriculum conversations like this

(edited 1 year ago)
(first woo!)

I remember studying slums in different countries for 2 consecutive years in secondary (I didn't take geography at GCSE or a level) and while I understand the importance of seeing the effects of inequalities, it was a very similar scheme of work to the previous year. as a fan of physical geography I wish we did more of that but obviously you have to have a balance (maybe more maps and physical geography as I have a friend who took it at GCSE who thought that Australia was France on a map!)
I think climate change should have more of a focus too
Globalisation, resource spread, climate change etc so a lot of human geography but also basic things such as how to read a map. Plus more knowledge of where countries are in the world. I know lots of people who did geography at A-level who dont know where many countries are on a map
Maybe I need someone who did geography beyond Y9 to explain to me what really links physical and human geography, because they always felt quite separate to me. I can't think of another subject where we built model volcanoes, designed animals adapted to live in the rainforest and did group projects on an African footballer all under the same subject title!

I think both are important, but I'd almost consider splitting them in half. You could have an environmental science subject that is very much about science, climate change, ecology, energy and the like, as well as about how volcanoes, earthquakes and glaciers work. That could exist as a fourth natural science subject.

You could then have a much more social sciencey subject, that perhaps went much closer towards economics and sociology, learning about globalisation, how markets work, trade, how to lift people out of poverty, as well as learning about different cultures.

There's also a place for learning about continents, countries, flags etc., but probably more for primary school!

Spitballing a bit here, but what's this project for if not that? :tongue:
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Saracen's Fez
Maybe I need someone who did geography beyond Y9 to explain to me what really links physical and human geography, because they always felt quite separate to me. I can't think of another subject where we built model volcanoes, designed animals adapted to live in the rainforest and did group projects on an African footballer all under the same subject title!

I think both are important, but I'd almost consider splitting them in half. You could have an environmental science subject that is very much about science, climate change, ecology, energy and the like, as well as about how volcanoes, earthquakes and glaciers work. That could exist as a fourth natural science subject.

You could then have a much more social sciencey subject, that perhaps went much closer towards economics and sociology, learning about globalisation, how markets work, trade, how to lift people out of poverty, as well as learning about different cultures.

There's also a place for learning about continents, countries, flags etc., but probably more for primary school!

Spitballing a bit here, but what's this project for if not that? :tongue:


Later on in school, you are expected to make more links between topics, including physical and human. So how does the physical environment impacts the built environment, resources etc and how humans are impacting the physical environment. You can't really split them in half as that kinda defects the point of geography.
(edited 1 year ago)
Basic things like finding where countries are on a map and what their capital cities are.

Spoiler

Original post by Mesopotamian.
Up until about May this year when it became a possibility I may have to move up there and therefore needed to search up where exactly it exists, I thought Liverpool was here:
7C8BC647-E712-40EA-93F0-1577B8FE3EFF.jpeg
:colondollar:


Original post by KA_P
For the whole start of high school, I thought Edinburgh was near London :creep:

Apparently we also need to teach the locations of major cities in the UK:tongue:
Geography GCSE maths was easy, but at A-level there are some shared maths skills with A-level Maths :afraid:
Original post by hungrysalamander
Basic things like finding where countries are on a map and what their capital cities are.

Spoiler




PSROM - it's really fun when you're able to test yourself on them as well, so it'd definitely serve as some motivation :yep:

Original post by hungrysalamander
Apparently we also need to teach the locations of major cities in the UK:tongue:

:eviltongue:
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by hungrysalamander
Apparently we also need to teach the locations of major cities in the UK:tongue:


:rofl:

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