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    Any tips from past applicants/how are this years applicants preparing?
    I don't know whether to focus on extra-curricular topics or read up loads on what I'm studying in class...
    And historiography's a bit of a dilemma as well... how much to do? Are the standard 'What is History?'/'In Defence of History' essential? Since I've read neither...
    Thanks
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    (Original post by gracey17)
    Any tips from past applicants/how are this years applicants preparing?
    I don't know whether to focus on extra-curricular topics or read up loads on what I'm studying in class...
    And historiography's a bit of a dilemma as well... how much to do? Are the standard 'What is History?'/'In Defence of History' essential? Since I've read neither...
    Thanks
    I'm in a similar position to you. I've been thinking about trying to arrange a mock interview, but I don't want to do this until I actually get an interview (or outright rejection ) from the uni, but that doesn't happen for Oxford until a week beforehand, which doesn't leave much time if I am fortunate enough to get one...

    However, for Oxford, they say on the website that they discuss the stuff on your PS and the written work you submitted. I don't know about Cambridge, but I guess the same principle applies; read your submitted essay again and see if you've got any new thoughts on it, and with your PS make sure you have read any books you've mentioned! Also read over the stuff you've done in your course, have it relatively fresh in your mind. I don't think they expect you to have done loads of extra-curricular stuff, although reading a few books that you think would be interesting to discuss is a good starting point, and hopefully if you want to study History for three years you're probably doing enough of that anyway.

    R.e. the historiography, I don't know if you *need* it since it isn't formally part of the A Level course (at least not in mine, anyway), but if you want to read any then can I suggest you look for a book called "What Is History Today"? It's a compilation of lots of historian's views on what defines different types of history and is published by the "History Today" magazine, although the copy I have is a bit old; maybe your school has a copy? It's a lot more accessible than "What Is History" since it's in bite-size essays; also you can focus it to your particular interests since there are essays covering Military History, Political History, Women's History etc. etc.

    Anyway, that's just my two pence on the matter, though bear in mind I probably know just the same or less than you. :rolleyes: And good luck!
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    maybe you could practice some lip exercises so your on your A game for some good ass kissing lololol

    EDIT: sorry for offering nothing to the thread... I haven't gone to bed yet
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    Historiography isn't part of the A Level course, but will probably feature in at least some of the questions they ask - if only on the practical level of how a historian should view a source, which you might be given to read. It's definitely worth reading some, even if it is just Evans or Carr.
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    If you've sent an essay in, revise that topic as a priority. Also, reread your PS a few times so you're confident talking about it. Otherwise, just treat it as a discussion and enjoy it.
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    (Original post by HoVis)
    I'm in a similar position to you. I've been thinking about trying to arrange a mock interview, but I don't want to do this until I actually get an interview (or outright rejection ) from the uni, but that doesn't happen for Oxford until a week beforehand, which doesn't leave much time if I am fortunate enough to get one...

    However, for Oxford, they say on the website that they discuss the stuff on your PS and the written work you submitted. I don't know about Cambridge, but I guess the same principle applies; read your submitted essay again and see if you've got any new thoughts on it, and with your PS make sure you have read any books you've mentioned! Also read over the stuff you've done in your course, have it relatively fresh in your mind. I don't think they expect you to have done loads of extra-curricular stuff, although reading a few books that you think would be interesting to discuss is a good starting point, and hopefully if you want to study History for three years you're probably doing enough of that anyway.

    R.e. the historiography, I don't know if you *need* it since it isn't formally part of the A Level course (at least not in mine, anyway), but if you want to read any then can I suggest you look for a book called "What Is History Today"? It's a compilation of lots of historian's views on what defines different types of history and is published by the "History Today" magazine, although the copy I have is a bit old; maybe your school has a copy? It's a lot more accessible than "What Is History" since it's in bite-size essays; also you can focus it to your particular interests since there are essays covering Military History, Political History, Women's History etc. etc.

    Anyway, that's just my two pence on the matter, though bear in mind I probably know just the same or less than you. :rolleyes: And good luck!
    thanks, it's interesting to know how other people are preparing... my problem is that, though I've read the books on my statement and so on, there are some throwaway comments on my personal statement that might cause problems if I was asked about them. stupid me for trying to sound too clever! :o: so I'm frantically reading up on medieval history and what have you. fooooolish

    the historiographical one sounds interesting as well, I'll check it out I ordered some book off the internet, 'a history of histories', but it's wayy too big for me to read in the time I've got
    might not have gotten an interview anyway, so I better not try and tempt fate.. good luck!
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    (Original post by gracey17)
    thanks, it's interesting to know how other people are preparing... my problem is that, though I've read the books on my statement and so on, there are some throwaway comments on my personal statement that might cause problems if I was asked about them. stupid me for trying to sound too clever! :o: so I'm frantically reading up on medieval history and what have you. fooooolish

    the historiographical one sounds interesting as well, I'll check it out I ordered some book off the internet, 'a history of histories', but it's wayy too big for me to read in the time I've got
    might not have gotten an interview anyway, so I better not try and tempt fate.. good luck!
    I'd say the most useful book you could get for historiography is The Pursuit Of History by John Tosh. It was my bible in the run-up to my history interview and look where I am now! It is informative, well-written accessible - you'll definitely be able to read it in the run-up to your interview. If you do get it and you're in a rush, you can send me a PM and I can tell you which chapters to prioritise.

    If you've sent in an essay, I'd recommend reading a little bit extra on the areas that your essay covered - but it looks like you're doing that already, so that's good.
 
 
 
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