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Will dyspraxia diagnosis ruin prospects 2 do medicine watch

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    (Original post by belis)
    It may be my limited grasp of English language getting into the way of communication but my understanding of 'However, I'd hesitate about letting is dyspraxic play around with the small, sharp, pointy things' is that you implied that dyspraxics are unsafe to perform proceures involving sharp objects.
    I implied that I would hesitate about, not prohibit, letting dyspraxics play around with the small, sharp, pointy things.
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    (Original post by maxi321)
    as in bumping into thinks, stamping of peoples feet, not following a beat when dancing etc
    That's a disability?!
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I implied that I would hesitate about, not prohibit, letting dyspraxics play around with the small, sharp, pointy things.

    Fair enough. I am obviously a bit touchy about possibility of my right to play with sharp objects being taken away from me.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    That's a disability?!
    indeed, but my gross motor skills arent bad. its not that i don't think i won't be able to practise, its more, with a diagnosis will people even give me the chance.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    That's a disability?!
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...ders#Dyspraxia

    Quite a basic summary. It's a developmenal disorder and affects movement/co-ordination.
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    (Original post by River85)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...ders#Dyspraxia

    Quite a basic summary. It's a developmenal disorder and affects movement/co-ordination.
    Wow, that list is me down to a T, but I wouldn't call myself disabled, just a bit clumsy, (bit pathetic as well that I'm 19, got A's at A level yet still can't tell left from right without thinking about it for a couple of seconds first!)

    If it was just as the OP said; he's fine except for not being able to follow a beat when dancing or a bit clumsy, stepping on people's feet. How on earth would that stop someone from becoming a doctor? The only place he'd get kicked off is during placements when it becomes extremely apparent that he can't even pick up a bottle without dropping or spilling it, but if it isn't that bad then how is it stopping him?
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    I was talking to my head of pastoral care about this last week because my fibromyalgia plays havoc with my fine motor skills. She said (and would know more about this than anyone else at Edinburgh) that the only sort of disabilities that would make them think twice about an admission are wheelchair users due to the height of beds for CPR. Once you're in the system your in. I can't stand up for more than 5 minutes, the uni's previously graduated double leg amputees, someone with only one hand and a whole multitude of hearing impaired students for medicine. Dyspraxia won't stop you getting in. The requirement for CPR to graduate is also a bit vague, I couldn't do it for more than a minute or so but the uni have been completely fine about it. You might feel that your future career choices may be curtailed because of it but I can't see why that should be, disability discrimination act and all. Feel free to PM for more info if needs be.

    Edit: for confidentiality
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    (Original post by michaela_banana)
    I was talking to my head of pastoral care about this last week because my fibromyalgia plays havoc with my fine motor skills. She said (and would know more about this than anyone else at Edinburgh) that the only sort of disabilities that would make them think twice about an admission are wheelchair users due to the height of beds for CPR. Once you're in the system your in. I can't stand up for more than 5 minutes, the uni's previously graduated double leg amputees, someone with only one hand and a whole multitude of hearing impaired students for medicine. Dyspraxia won't stop you getting in. The requirement for CPR to graduate is also a bit vague, I couldn't do it for more than a minute or so but the uni have been completely fine about it. You might feel that your future career choices may be curtailed because of it but I can't see why that should be, disability discrimination act and all. Feel free to PM for more info if needs be.
    Right this is going to sound extremely harsh but why shouldn't your career options be curtailed? You can't stand up for the entirety of a surgery, you can't perform CPR for more than a minute, if it plays havoc with your fine motor skills presumably you can't take bloods and do cannulation. Surely you will consider this before opting for certain careers?
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    Why? Just because I'm disabled doesn't mean I'm not perfectly able to do any career I so choose provided provisions are made. So I couldn't stand up throught surgery - get a stool - nowadays there are surgeons in wheelchairs. I can't perform CPR for long periods, but I'm perfectly capable of calling for help and instructing someone else. I can take bloods without much difficulty if I can rest my elbow on something. I did fine dissection and IVF over the summer without difficulty. Regardless of my own circumstances the disability discrimination act would always stand in my defence. There's nothing wrong with my brain whatsoever. In fact, the member of staff mentioned above said that it's often dyslexic students who cause more concern due to keeping up with reading charts, and could you really tell someone they couldn't be a doctor because of dyslexia!
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    sorry but I think there are certain things that you should be prevented doing. For example, you can't do certain surgery in a wheelchair, if your working somewhere with a high rate of cardiac arrest, you should be moved- otherwise what happens if the rest of the resus team don't make it within a minute- unlikely perhaps but still possible

    Surely you can see that there are some areas of medicine that you're not going to be able to do?
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    (Original post by crazyhelicopter)
    , if your working somewhere with a high rate of cardiac arrest, you should be moved- otherwise what happens if the rest of the resus team don't make it within a minute- unlikely perhaps but still possible
    I must say that I am impressed with the performance at your hospital. A minute for a crash team to arrive?! Over hear it usually takes good 3-4 minutes for the first person and even longer for the whole team to assemble. Unless you are talking about areas like ITU when everyone needed is already in the vicinity.
    The longest responce time I have encountered was just over 10 minutes (distant part of the hospital). Probably longest 10 minutes in my life.
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    (Original post by belis)
    I must say that I am impressed with the performance at your hospital. A minute for a crash team to arrive?! Over hear it usually takes good 3-4 minutes for the first person and even longer for the whole team to assemble. Unless you are talking about areas like ITU when everyone needed is already in the vicinity.
    The longest responce time I have encountered was just over 10 minutes (distant part of the hospital). Probably longest 10 minutes in my life.
    I've never seen a crash team assemble that quickly either, but micheal_banana seems to think they can instruct others in effective CPR, so I figured he could grab a visitor or patient. Or failing that there may be a trained helpful med student or nurse. Wouldn't like to end up on his ward though
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    Keep this on topic, please
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    I've never seen a crash team assemble that quickly either, but micheal_banana seems to think they can instruct others in effective CPR, so I figured he could grab a visitor or patient. Or failing that there may be a trained helpful med student or nurse. Wouldn't like to end up on his ward though
    The way it usually works (in my experience) is that CPR is being provided by nursing staff and HCAs like my good self. It is very rare for a doctor to be present on the ward when arrest occurs (for some strange reasons people tend to crash out of hours) so it comes down to nursing staff to provide ILS.

    It is somewhat relevant issue IMO as ability to perform CPR seems to be one of the most important criteria used by universities to determine whether somone is fit to practise. How often is it actualy performed by practising doctors though?
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    (Original post by belis)
    It is somewhat relevant issue IMO as ability to perform CPR seems to be one of the most important criteria used by universities to determine whether somone is fit to practise. How often is it actualy performed by practising doctors though?
    I'm not sure how often it's performed by practising doctors tbh, seems to depend the grade of the doctor. My worry is more that if required to do CPR someone wouldn't be able to, and instead would be standing there like a spare part. This imo this greatly jepordises the patient care and puts unnecessary stress on other members of the team who then have to cover for said individual
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    Perhaps those discussing CPR would be interested to read this quote made by Dr Kathy McLean, chair of the GMC Gateways Project Board of the scheme to develop guidance supporting medical students with disabilities:

    “We have identified a number of assumptions that we think are preventing students with disabilities and disabled doctors from reaching their potential. One assumption is the false belief that someone who cannot perform CPR because of a disability can’t become a doctor. Clearly, most of us if asked would agree that there is much more to being an effective doctor than the ability to perform CPR."

    To graduate a medical student must be competent in 18 clinical and practical skills, one of which is competence in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, however it is sufficient to be able to tell others what to do, rather than doing it themselves. (in reality though doctors often arent the ones who do CPR, as nurses are more readily on hand). For those disabled people who want more info, see the 'Disability guidance' on the gmc website.

    People with disabilities have a valuable place in medicine as they often have direct experience of a particular condition and living with an impairment. Also through their own experiences disabled people are often aware of what it is like to be on the other side of treatment as it were, i.e. in hospitals, so can relate. Patients have been found to identify closely with disabled medical professionals who can offer insight and sensitivity about how a recent diagnosis and ongoing impairment can affect the patient.

    Tbh some of the comments here show a lack of sensitivity that would not be expected in future doctors...

    To all the disabled people out there considering medicine I really urge you to go for it! Yes, you may meet people who are sceptical of your ability and yes, you may find some things more difficult than able-bodied people, but if medicine is your true ambition then it is worth it. Medicine as a course and a career is hard for anyone, disabled people just have to work that little bit harder. However, provisions can be put into place once qualified (though this can be more tricky when on rotation during foundation training) and a speciality can eventually be chosen to suit your specific needs.

    Good for you michaela banana and dont be put off maxi321!
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    It's also worth remembering that it's up to you whether you disclose any disabilities.
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    But equally if you chose to deliberately conceal, and if affects your abilities to perform as a doctor, then you get int ot he grey areas of "duties of a doc"... They will hang you out to dry if anything happens... Honesty is ALWAYS the best policy...
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    (Original post by rocher)
    “We have identified a number of assumptions that we think are preventing students with disabilities and disabled doctors from reaching their potential. One assumption is the false belief that someone who cannot perform CPR because of a disability can’t become a doctor. Clearly, most of us if asked would agree that there is much more to being an effective doctor than the ability to perform CPR."
    That's because MOST medical schools, when faced with a disabled doc wanna be, MAKE them PROVE they can do CRP before making there offer offical.... So if it is a false belief, it is only that as a result of propigation from medical schools themselves...

    PS I've known two medical students with CPR limiting abilities who have been dragged in to a special FtP committee to PROVE they can perform adequate CPR...
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    (Original post by rocher)
    a speciality can eventually be chosen to suit your specific needs.
    This was my key issue with micheal_bananas comment. He seemed to be saying that as a disabled student he would have no limits on the specialities he was able to do, I dispute this.

    As for CPR I personally think it is very important that a doctor is able to perform CPR, because at some point in your career you may be first on scene. As for other skills, if provisions can be made so you can do the skills, you should be allowed to be a doctor, but you have to accept that there may be limitations to the career pathways you can follow when you qualify.
 
 
 
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