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Physics resit year 12

So basically my end of year mocks went horribly, i got a C in physics which was the only C i got compared to my maths, further maths and chemistry ones. So obviouslyyyy I resat and I want at least A.

I think i will get around 70-75% is that enough for an A grade in physics ?- this wasnt an AS paper so you can get an A*
Original post by tiredpersonxx
So basically my end of year mocks went horribly, i got a C in physics which was the only C i got compared to my maths, further maths and chemistry ones. So obviouslyyyy I resat and I want at least A.

I think i will get around 70-75% is that enough for an A grade in physics ?- this wasnt an AS paper so you can get an A*

Depends on the exam board/whether your teachers make up grade boundaries.

Let’s assume that actual grade boundaries were used:

If OCR A was the exam board, an A is possible, but you could be given a B, as they have stupidly high grade boundaries. An A* is generally around 85%, thus an A* is unlikely.

If any other exam board was used, it’s definitely doable and an A* is a distinct possibility if you are looking towards the upper end of that range.
Original post by TypicalNerd
Depends on the exam board/whether your teachers make up grade boundaries.

Let’s assume that actual grade boundaries were used:

If OCR A was the exam board, an A is possible, but you could be given a B, as they have stupidly high grade boundaries. An A* is generally around 85%, thus an A* is unlikely.

If any other exam board was used, it’s definitely doable and an A* is a distinct possibility if you are looking towards the upper end of that range.


oh yes sorry, my exam board aqa, i heard that OCR A had really high grade boundaries. The aqa board is kinda high-ish but im not rly sure. Thank you though
Original post by tiredpersonxx
oh yes sorry, my exam board aqa, i heard that OCR A had really high grade boundaries. The aqa board is kinda high-ish but im not rly sure. Thank you though


Let’s consider the june 2019 grade boundaries.

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/over/stat_pdf/AQA-A-LEVEL-RL-GDE-BDY-JUN-2019.PDF

The notionals say that papers 1 and 2 both required 69/85 (81.1%) for an A* and 60/85 (70.6%) for an A.

You’ve most likely got an A.
Original post by TypicalNerd
Let’s consider the june 2019 grade boundaries.

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/over/stat_pdf/AQA-A-LEVEL-RL-GDE-BDY-JUN-2019.PDF

The notionals say that papers 1 and 2 both required 69/85 (81.1%) for an A* and 60/85 (70.6%) for an A.

You’ve most likely got an A.

Oh ok, thats very reassuring to hear thank you very much for your help :smile:
Some completely unsolicited advice. Maybe take a look at this. It’s really good and the checklists should be really helpful for year 13.

https://www.alevelphysicsonline.com/aqa
Hey!
If you'd like here are some tips and resources for A-Level Physics that I found useful during my A-level days:

Textbooks - the ones recommend by your exam provider are your best bet. You should be able to see a list of these on the respective subject pages under the Published Resources tab



Youtube - Channels like science shorts, professor dave, physics online are the ones I remember at the top of my head. I found them super helpful during my preparations. I think the founder of Physics Online also has a really friendly and helpful discord server where there are multiple people to help you out.



The syllabus from the official qualification-provider’s website. Use this to ensure that you’re able to state answers for almost the entire curriculum. Use the syllabus document to cover other concepts that you could have missed out.



Websites like save my exam and khan academy also have plenty of high quality resources that you could refer to.



For notes, you could turn to Znotes, although I’d recommend making your own, since I’ve found the note-making process to be highly rewarding.



Then you could turn to official past papers that are available on numerous websites like gceguide.



Once you begin to feel confident while solving past papers, I highly recommend you to start challenging yourself with university-level questions (you can google online for textbooks - there are many that are available) or university admissions test (like the PAT, NSAA, ENGAA) or even Olympiads (like UKMT, BPhO).



Since I applied to Oxford for Physics in 2020 (accepted), I used the Ultimate Oxford PAT Collection by Uni Admissions during my preparation. While this was meant for the PAT, the PAT (Physics Aptitude Test for Oxford) by itself is tested on A-Level portions, hence you could use this book. I personally found the book to be very helpful since it has a lot of questions that are both similar to those on the real exam and those that are unique and force you think outside the box. One other benefit was the extremely detailed marking schemes that bridged all the gaps in my learning. I've linked the book below in case you’d like to use it in the future!

Ultimate Oxford PAT Collection by Uni Admissions: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ultimate-PAT-Collection-breakdowns-UniAdmissions/dp/1913683877


Just like any other A-Level you really need to understand and like the subject in order to do well!

Hope this helps.
Best of luck!!

PS: you can also check edX, udemy and coursera - I’ve heard there are quite a few courses available especially for subjects like certain physics concepts like nuclear- and atomic-physics.

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