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Law-related EPQ topics

If anyone who has gone on to study law/did a law-related EPQ could tell me a little bit about their topic as well as the grade that they achieved/are expected to achieve, that would be great- in need of some ideas of the type of thing that people write. Alternatively, any lawyers/law students, if you were given the opportunity to do an EPQ-type of thing now, what would you do it on?
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 1
Hi

Sorry nobody has replied yet.
You can do an internet search for law-related EPQ topics and this will give you plenty of ideas. Your title should not be too broad as you have limited words and need to do analysis. You could well have an abstract and you will have an introduction and conclusion. This uses part of the word count up.
It should not be too narrow as you need to be able to write 5000 words about it and you need to have enough accessible sources.

It is interesting to know what grades were achieved by others. However, their title choice may not have had such an influence on the grade. Whilst title choice may be relevant to the final mark in some ways, other things are relevant too such as doing a detailed log (in particular), correct referencing, research, literature review, structure, use of academic language, showing time-planning (as well as actually managing time so you don't end up like many students....last minute.com), analysis, jumping through the various hoops required, the presentation at the end. Also, try and do something that interests you.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/epq-success

This course is free if you choose to join with limited access. It is good. There is definitely no need to pay for it.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/research-project

You can also do this course with no charge.

It may be worth buying an EPQ book if your funds stretch to this. If the EPQ is an AQA one there is a useful textbook which may help.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by ella1507
If anyone who has gone on to study law/did a law-related EPQ could tell me a little bit about their topic as well as the grade that they achieved/are expected to achieve, that would be great- in need of some ideas of the type of thing that people write. Alternatively, any lawyers/law students, if you were given the opportunity to do an EPQ-type of thing now, what would you do it on?


Hi there.

@CatusStarbright and possibly @bea_murray0 could help. :smile:

Thanks for bumping and helping OP @Cote1! :smile:

Best wishes.
Original post by ella1507
If anyone who has gone on to study law/did a law-related EPQ could tell me a little bit about their topic as well as the grade that they achieved/are expected to achieve, that would be great- in need of some ideas of the type of thing that people write. Alternatively, any lawyers/law students, if you were given the opportunity to do an EPQ-type of thing now, what would you do it on?

Hi there,

I'll be honest; I never did an EPQ (though was interested in it). I do know however that a law-based EQP will pretty much need to be an essay, and essay EPQs apparently are up to a wordcount of 5,000 words.

5,000 words is half of my undergraduate dissertation length, but it will follow the same process:

1.

The first step is to figure out which topics interest you: what have you read about law/the legal system that stood out to you? which topics are perhaps ones that personally resonate with you and your experiences so far?

2.

Map out the topics: what do you know about them, where are your knowledge gaps? From what you've written, you may need to do a little preliminary research to see if a topic is viable (if you have a lot of gaps). Once you have it laid out, you'll be able to see if there's enough complexity to write a 5,000-word essay or not, and which topic idea has the most potential.

3.

Choose your topic.

4.

Break your topic idea down into sections. Typically a good essay has an introduction (laying out brief background, the key issues, and your idea/argument that you will be presenting), three main sections (as a guide), and a conclusion (explicitly stating how the sections relate, summing up your argument, maybe looking to the future/mentioning what factors may change your conclusion).

5.

From there you will be able to see what you need to research to be able to write.

6.

Begin research - I tend to research generally at first to help formulate my ideas within each section, and then once I have enough to be able to start writing, I do so and then research specific things as I go/when I need to.

7.

You will probably end up modifying your plan as your research throws up new ideas and arguments, causing you to repeat some of the above stages. Do not be afraid of this! It is normal to need to re-think things as you go; this is part of the process and is how the project matures and develops.

8.

Once you have written the first draft, go back and edit. I tend to do this as I finish each section and then have another big edit once I finish the whole essay. Do not skip this step; it is vital to the cohesiveness of the essay! I often find that when I reach the end of an essay, I need to go back and fine-tune the earlier parts to ensure it flows well and every single paragraph leads neatly into the conclusion. That is what will get you the best marks.

9.

Once you are happy with the essay, submit and relax!


I hope this helps :smile:

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