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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    You can live with dignity, but you can't die with it.

    Quote from House. Agree with it. Idea to die with dignity appears to be unrealistic/unpractical.
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    It's not the case that a 13 year old is unaware of the meaning of death. I doubt anyone is suggesting that. It's more a question of whether a 13 year old child has had enough experience and has the intellectual capacity to deem that her life is no longer worth living.
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    A terminally-ill girl has won the right to die after a hospital ended its bid to force her to have a heart operation.

    Herefordshire Primary Care Trust dropped High Court proceedings after a child protection officer told the court Hannah Jones did not want the surgery.

    The 13-year-old, from Marden, has refused a heart transplant because it might not work and, if it did, would be followed by constant medication.

    The girl, who has a hole in her heart, says she wants to die with dignity.



    Thoughts? Personally I find it quite shocking

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7721231.stm
    yes rather shock indeed. did she ever explain her position? if so it does make sense and I would congradulate the media for following personal wants of not exposing such information.
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    I think everyone here has forgotten being 13. I certainly wasn't a 'child'.
    We're not talking about a 5 year old. At 13, you're very aware of the world and circumstances such as this can make someone grow extremely mature for their age.

    Every person has a right to choose their own fate. Can a 13 year old comprehend this kind of decision? Probably not. But she's been forced to. I can imagine it was an impossible decision for her. Death...or a life of suffering.

    How can you give someone else the right to decide for her?
    I think she's a very brave young girl.

    "what does she know?"....a hell of a lot more than we do.

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    Mm. Not something I agree with, especially with the decision made by a 13-year-old. You only get one life; ending it by choice can't be right.

    But then again, I'm not in her position. However, I do (or did) know somebody close to me who refused treatment though and chose to die instead, and it was heartbreaking but made me angry more than anything else. Life isn't to be ended when you feel like it, and a doctor's job should be to preserve life, whatever it takes.
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    (Original post by Echolife)
    Perhaps there are other reasons to take into account. Perhaps she doesn't have a loving family to support her etc.
    on the page it says this though:

    "Parents 'proud'

    Our reporter said that the girl's parents supported her decision and were "very proud of her".

    "She didn't take the decision lightly, and she had chosen that she wanted to live and die in dignity at home with her parents."

    The Daily Telegraph quoted Hannah's father Andrew, 43, as saying: "It is outrageous that the people from the hospital could presume we didn't have our daughter's best interests at heart.

    "Hannah had been through enough already and to have the added stress of a possible court hearing or being forcibly taken into hospital is disgraceful."

    Hannah previously suffered from leukaemia and her heart has been weakened by drugs she was required to take from the age of five. "



    i'm not really sure what i think. I respect her, but at the same time I think she's too young to really understand what she's doing.
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    Personally, I find her extremely brave.

    We can al sit here and harp on that most 13 year olds don't understand death - And you're probably right. But this girl is not most 13 year olds. She has been fighting death since she was 5; Most 13 year olds don't do that. She's had a long time, as have her parents, to come to terms with death and understand it.

    This operation will not save her life. It will give her time - The article does not say how much time. It could be months, it could be years, but death will come to this girl, probably before she comes out of her teenage years.

    She's made the brave decision to die now, rather than go through a risky operation, have several months most likely in pain and have to take drugs which none of us know the side effects for, just for (in the worst case) the sake of a few months. Equally, the operation is branded as "extremely risky". The girl is obviously extremely sick, none of us know the likely survival rate for this girl and it could be that the odds are tipped against her and that she is more likely to die on the table, thus robbing herself and her family of time together.


    It is not our place to judge the families decision.
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    i dont understand how a 13 year old has been allowed this decision when an adult can have a degenerative disease and is not granted the right to enthunasia!!
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    (Original post by 05231991)
    There is no right or wrong to her decision, but I really think 13 is too young to be making this kind of decision. This 'hole' in the heart happens in 1 in a few thousand babies and through treatment most of the affected babies grow up to be reatively normal. It's not like this thing is not treatable. If it's terminal cancer, I can understand, this is just... But afterall, it's her life.
    Yeah, but she hasn't got the typical case of a hole in the heart, for example the doctors have told her that a heart transplant will only provide a temporary respite, and even if the transplant was successful the anti-rejection drugs that she would have to take, could trigger a recurrence of leukaemia.

    Now after suffering from leukaemia for several years, to be told that a new heart would only provide a temporary respite, and that the drugs she would have to take could cause a recurrence of leukaemia, I'm not surprised that she took the option to refuse treatment.
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    Grgh, someone that age can choose? A sad story. I suppose though, if someone is in so much terminal pain and suffering, the only humane thing to do is let them pass away if they wish. Even if they are young, it's not like they have a future.

    However, the same right must be extended to people who are actually old enough to choose.
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    I don't think she's old enough to make a proper decision. The parents should see that too and perhaps try and get her to take medicine until she's a bit older and wiser which when she would be in a better position to make a better decision.
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    Grgh, someone that age can choose? A sad story. I suppose though, if someone is in so much terminal pain and suffering, the only humane thing to do is let them pass away if they wish. Even if they are young, it's not like they have a future.

    However, the same right must be extended to people who are actually old enough to choose.
    Older people already have the right to refuse treatment
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    (Original post by rlw31)
    Older people already have the right to refuse treatment
    So I heard. However, they do not have the right to painless euthanasia, do they?
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    That's quite amazing. It's a very brave decision for her to make, but she definitely has a right to make it.
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    (Original post by fisherman)
    How sad. Poor girl.

    But I thought everyone had the right to refuse hospital treatment?
    i feel more sorry for the parents. how sad that she wan't to basically kill herself and put other people through so much misery, just because she didn't want to take medicine. sure, it might be a different situation if after the transplant she wasn't getting any better, then she should be allowed to stop...
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    That's quite sad. Fair enough though, that's her decision. She may have been ill for the rest of her life and she might not want that. But can a 13 year old really make a decision as big as that?
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    So I heard. However, they do not have the right to painless euthanasia, do they?
    Nor does anyone in the UK. The girl in this case has simply been given the right to refuse treatment, that's not the same as euthanasia is it?
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    I think she's a really brave girl. I know I'd be terrified in her situtation. I hope she gets to enjoy the time she has left with her family.
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    (Original post by Crazster)
    Just for starters, "more" of death??
    Just for starters, don't correct a perfectly-structured sentence; it's embarrassing for everyone.

    Secondly, a single question mark would be English.

    Thirdly, he's right and you're wrong. All you can know about death is what it is. At age thirteen, you're perfectly capable of understanding everything about death that you're ever going to understand. At least until you die. As one of the articles states, the girl reasoned that she'd rather spend the remainder of her life appreciating her time with her family than risk dying on a hospital bed, which, I think, puts her at a rather higher maturity level than the content of your posts would indicate of you.
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    She's 13! And what's wrong with taking medication?? That's ridiculous.
 
 
 
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