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Does a law degree limit you to a law career?

I am in Year 12 doing my A-Levels and I am torn between doing either a law or business degree. I am most drawn to a career in law but I am also interested in business consultancy.

My plan was to do a business degree with the option of doing a law conversion course. This seemed perfect as it left both of my potential career options open. However, I am now questioning whether a business degree is at all desirable to law firms as it doesn’t involve skills such as constructing an argument. My other option is to do a law degree straight away but I am nervous this closes off anything other than a legal career. Does anyone know if this is true? Or if a career such as business consultancy would still be an option?
(edited 1 year ago)
Doing a law degree definitely doesn't limit you to a career in law. Both degrees are very well respected and can be used as stepping stones to other careers. Personally, I think a law degree would be the more highly respected of the two.
Original post by elliemaex
I am in Year 12 doing my A-Levels and I am torn between doing either a law or business degree. I am most drawn to a career in law but I am also interested in business consultancy.

My plan was to do a business degree with the option of doing a law conversion course. This seemed perfect as it left both of my potential career options open. However, I am now questioning whether a business degree is at all desirable to law firms as it doesn’t involve skills such as constructing an argument. My other option is to do a law degree straight away but I am nervous this closes off anything other than a legal career. Does anyone know if this is true? Or if a career such as business consultancy would still be an option?

A law degree would definitely not stop you from starting a career in business consultancy or any sort of career such as that. You would learn a lot of transferable skills which would be valuable in a lot of professional career paths. I believe the current figure is that only about 50% of law graduates actually go on to practice law.

Equally, you could still do a business-related degree, however you would then need to do a conversion course if you wanted to go into law and you would need to work out how to fund that.
Reply 3
Tony Blair became Prime Minister and Keir Starmer aspires to
Short answer: No
No.
Plenty of law graduates have established successful & well paid careers in a variety of industries and professional roles.
Academics, actors, artists, authors, editors, entrepreneurs, estate agents, journalists, judges, lobbyists, musicians, politicians, private tutors recruitment consultants and tv presenters.
Some would say a law degree is much better than quite a lot of slightly new strange "business" courses.

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