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    Hi there, I was wondering if anyone could answer a few questions
    What is the work load like at St Andrews?
    How long are the terms?
    If you know, how do the admissions work?
    What is the accommodation like?
    What help is available for people with learning disabilities? I.e, dyslexia.
    For those that don't live in Scotland, how do you feel about living so far away from home?
    Finally the biggest question, I have heard that it is possible you can skip the first year so the course is only 3 years and not 4, is this true?

    If i were to be honest I don't mind where I go to study Philosophy and what the course may entail, although at first it may seem naive, the reason is that I want to get a feel of Philosophy as a whole in that I don't want to go to a universities to study anything specific. I have much time later on to concentrate on specific branches of Philosophy which interest me personally. I will be brave and tell you that analytical Philosophy is not my favorite, but what I seek in terms of going to university for an undergraduate degree, is a high standard of teaching in Philosophy. At my Cambridge interview they used this against me, saying I wasn't suited to the course but saying that I am naturally a Political Philosopher and hope I would consider them in the future.
    P.S. I am also interested in Eastern Philosophy, of which isn't so common in the western world.
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    (Original post by Dan1607)
    Hi there, I was wondering if anyone could answer a few questions
    What is the work load like at St Andrews?
    How long are the terms?
    If you know, how do the admissions work?
    What is the accommodation like?
    What help is available for people with learning disabilities? I.e, dyslexia.
    For those that don't live in Scotland, how do you feel about living so far away from home?
    Finally the biggest question, I have heard that it is possible you can skip the first year so the course is only 3 years and not 4, is this true?

    If i were to be honest I don't mind where I go to study Philosophy and what the course may entail, although at first it may seem naive, the reason is that I want to get a feel of Philosophy as a whole in that I don't want to go to a universities to study anything specific. I have much time later on to concentrate on specific branches of Philosophy which interest me personally. I will be brave and tell you that analytical Philosophy is not my favorite, but what I seek in terms of going to university for an undergraduate degree, is a high standard of teaching in Philosophy. At my Cambridge interview they used this against me, saying I wasn't suited to the course but saying that I am naturally a Political Philosopher and hope I would consider them in the future.
    P.S. I am also interested in Eastern Philosophy, of which isn't so common in the western world.
    1. As much or as little as you make it. Any philosophy module you do a semester will comprise a 1/3rd of your workload (in theory; in practice you're invariably better at some modules than others and change the balance accordingly). You can 'get away' (and indeed a lot of people do) with just doing the obligatory reading, but you'll get passable marks at best. The best thing I can say is to treat a degree here (and a degree anywhere for that matter) like a job and work appropriate hours. It's recommended that you spend 2 hours out of class for every hour in for arts subjects, meaning you'll ideally do 36 hours a week. That seems a little low especially factoring in essays, but it's possible if you work smart.

    2. The first term is late Sep - mid Jan, and the second term is early Feb to the end of May. So approximately 4 months each, not factoring in holidays.

    3. Like anywhere else - you need good results, a good reference, and a good personal statement. Like many St Andrews departments, they do tend to attach higher-than-average significance to the personal statement. I got my offer late Jan/early Feb if that helps.

    4. Variable - Fife and Albany Parks are both cheap, but pretty grim. Most of the halls are nice, but often loud and quite invasive (lots of cool social events) and ResNet (internet) is a pain, blocking many games/torrent stuff, etc. In the catered halls, food is poor, but that's just institutional food for you. The top end places like David Russell Apartments are pretty sweet but you get what you pay for. Generally, accommodation here is far too expensive.

    Private accommodation is even worse. It's expensive (the place I am looking at next year is £90-100 a week). We looked at another place and it was £80 a week, and a total dump. There's a rush around now where all the houses are up to be snatched and they go ridiculously fast - if you see a place you like you basically grab it before someone else can. Accommodation is noted as easily one of the weakest points of the St Andrews experience. Doesn't help that it's in January just before exams.

    5. The same support as anywhere else. I can't comment specifically on dyslexia; your best bet is to contact the university directly.

    6. Personally, I don't mind. No-one really notices where you come from after a while, and though you'll almost certainly be homesick eventually St Andrews will feel like home (it does for me right now, one semester in.) How badly you'll be affected depends on how much you're a homebody, which isn't a question anyone except yourself can answer.

    7. The Second-Year entry is only possible if you're doing a science degree. If you're doing a joint degree, you can enter in the second year for the relevant science modules (I believe that is what ekpyrotic does.) If you're entering for MA Philosophy or MA Philosophy with any non-science subject then you cannot enter directly into the 2nd Year.

    8. If you're not sure what you want to study, you might want to consider taking a gap year to find out. Philosophy is not a good choice if you don't know what you want to do; it's broad, but broad in a certain way and requiring special methods of its own. Doing philosophy because you're not sure is like doing a language because you're not sure; you can but it's hardly advisable. Nonetheless, if you're not sure the flexibility of the Scottish system will mean you can change if you want to, and thus is something to consider.

    9. As ekpyrotic noted, the course is heavily analytic. There are ethical and political philosophy modules in the first year, but these are to give you a familiarity with the basic issues - any ethics and political philosophy at honours tend to be much more meta-ethical and analytic in nature. Likewise I don't think there are any eastern or continental philosophy modules here. Continental philosophers are not well liked - I heard from someone that they used an idea by Foucault in their essays and their comments mentioned that 'they should not make reference to him again'.


    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    I heard from someone that they used an idea by Foucault in their essays and their comments mentioned that 'they should not make reference to him again'.
    lol, who did that happen to?
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    (Original post by Ekpyrotic)
    lol, who did that happen to?
    Can't remember, but it made me laugh.
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    May I just say that the both of you, (Jormungandr and Ekpyrotic) have been tremendously helpful. Aside from the "Doss-subject students", you have confirmed everything I hoped of st andrews. I am hugely analytical in both my interests and my approach (favouring Philosophy of language, mind and logic).

    Now i must wait for their decision, and I can but pray (in the most secular way possible) that they will deem me worthy enough to take on my degree at such a prestigious University.

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    milliethephilosopher,

    I wish you luck; when you applied last year did you get a rejection? And, are you straight philosophy?
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    Maybe you misunderstood me, I am certain that I want to study Philosophy. But I meant that I don’t mind how the course is actually structured. But from hearing some of your comments it seems I need to be careful.
    I don't understand why someone would be discouraged for referencing an idea just because it’s foreign. In fact such acts should be encouraged.
    Isn't that ignorance?
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    Last year I chose not to apply to St Andrews because, as an only child, I felt it too far away for my parents to cope. Instead, I applied to Cambridge, Edinburgh, Kings and Durham, and was dramatically unsuccessful.
    Thus, I was given my time again and - with the extra year at home - thought that my folks would be better equipped to deal with the distance.
    And so here I am, waiting and hoping that this time round I will be deemed worthy enough for an offer.
    And yes, I have applied for straight Philopshy at every university bar Edinburgh where they have a tiny course called "Mind and Language" that took my fancy


    Thankyou for the luck, it's very much appreciated
    (Original post by Ekpyrotic)
    milliethephilosopher,

    I wish you luck; when you applied last year did you get a rejection? And, are you straight philosophy?
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    I've taken PY1005 this semester and my honest assessment of the course is that it has been interesting but at the same time a lot less challenging and academically rigorous as my other subjects. As has been mentioned already, the course is based on analytical skills rather than remembering facts which is a good feature but makes it rather wishy-washy. People can easily get away without reading past the core texts when writing essays and still get decent, but not great, marks. The fact that most of the time we get hand-out notes rather than have to take notes seems to make lectures rather pointless, especially since the notes are available on WebCT. For tutorials, all the preparation you need to do is read a short chapter in the core text, though it must be noted these texts ar usually highly complex, and the tutors don't ask you to answer any questions or make a presentation ( at least mine didn't ).

    Overall: Lectures, Interesting but ultimatley pointless due to hand-outs. Tutorials, No necessary preparation needed will inevitably lead to people who ill prepare. Coursework, the essays were well chosen by the department but ultimately can be done in the space of one day to get a pass, ( that could never happen in English, History, IR etc...) though you will by no means be heading for a first class degree. I'm not doing philosophy as my degree and don't want to be a downer, I just think this particular module could do with being a bit more rigorous.
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    Highlander,

    Who are you?

    Edit: For the majority of the class philosophy's a new subject so the department is, undoubtedly, going to find it v. hard to make a course which is both introductory and challenging. The level of philosophical, and intellectual interest is too wide. The courses leaves a lot in your hands which is why essay marks are so spread.

    (Original post by Dan1607)
    Maybe you misunderstood me, I am certain that I want to study Philosophy. But I meant that I don’t mind how the course is actually structured. But from hearing some of your comments it seems I need to be careful.

    I don't understand why someone would be discouraged for referencing an idea just because it’s foreign. In fact such acts should be encouraged.
    Isn't that ignorance?
    St Andrews is analytical - full stop. [I'd say] this makes the department more academically rigorous. Continental phil. is ********. St Andrews makes isn't coy about it's interests.
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    (Original post by Jormungandr)

    In the catered halls, food is poor, but that's just institutional food for you.
    That reminds me of when I went to visit New Hall. On the tour, apparently the food is "excellent", but when I walked down the corridor to see a friend of mine who was living there, and asked her what the food was like, I got this response

    "Well, I'm sure it's very nutritious, but it doesn't actually taste of anything..."
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    (Original post by Bucky!)
    That reminds me of when I went to visit New Hall. On the tour, apparently the food is "excellent", but when I walked down the corridor to see a friend of mine who was living there, and asked her what the food was like, I got this response

    "Well, I'm sure it's very nutritious, but it doesn't actually taste of anything..."
    The quality of catering differs from hall to hall; McIntosh, on the whole, has been very good.
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    (Original post by Ekpyrotic)
    The quality of catering differs from hall to hall; McIntosh, on the whole, has been very good.
    Speak for yourself.

    I ate at McIntosh once and a steak with a pudding of icecream was like eating a leather boot smothered in watery mud followed by delicious pink styrofoam.

    Ick...
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    Oh dear, from tomorrow onwards it means checking our email inbox hourly
    I am actually praying to get an offer (call me desperate, BUT... )
    Good luck to everyone again!!
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    I think I might have accidentally eaten some rocks...no, wait... it's the UCAS deadline nerves!
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    hahah
    I have read ur other posts millie and you really do deserve a place with re-applying and everything! I kinda really want you to get in now (would it be your first choice?)
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    So nervous about this. I want it so much.
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    Hummel - thankyou yes, definitely my first choice, though I would be happy to go to any of my other Universities (to the St Andrews admissions tutor: this is a lie, I will only be happy in Fife).

    Clarkman: we all feel the same way; maybe we can put some of your fears to rest?
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    Yes Clarkman, don't worry, you are definately not alone!!

    Okay I think I really don't have a chance anymore...
    In the Offers Thread I read that someone got a offer for French...
    as I have applied for French& Philosophy and (like I told you my sad sad story ) my personal statement is really weak on philosophy (but okay on French) I think that means I won't get an offer now... otherwise the French department which seems to be quite quick would have made me one...

    oh well... that means gap year and reapplying =(
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    (Original post by Hummel)
    Yes Clarkman, don't worry, you are definately not alone!!

    Okay I think I really don't have a chance anymore...
    In the Offers Thread I read that someone got a offer for French...
    as I have applied for French& Philosophy and (like I told you my sad sad story ) my personal statement is really weak on philosophy (but okay on French) I think that means I won't get an offer now... otherwise the French department which seems to be quite quick would have made me one...

    oh well... that means gap year and reapplying =(
    Stay positive. It's not over until the fat lady sings.
 
 
 
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