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Getting into Investment Banking HELP

Hi everyone,

Currently studying (finished 1st year) Sports at Uni of Birmingham after getting a D*D*D* in Sports Science. I'm really not enjoying it and regretting my choice. I have a keen interest in finance and the investment banking industry. If i were to try switch degrees to something like econ or money,banking,finance. Would i have a better chance of getting things like internships (which i guess are impossible on my current degree). with a different degree? I have a contact at JP Morgan as well. ?
Yeah much better choices. If you can switch courses to Econ/Accounting/Finance defo do it. It's kinda uncommon to go into IB with a BTEC background + Sport Science degree (despite your grades being very good, nicely done btw), the industry is just very standardised when it comes to education. It's all very much A-Levels -> Uni type of candidates you're gonna be stacked up against, but you can change your odds by switching courses to something more relevant to the norm of the industry. You can then build your background from there to what they're looking for in a candidate (join relevant societies, land internships etc.). You currently don't have any leg to stand on by doing Sport Science, it's not gonna do you in any favours in terms of career prospects and most importantly you don't enjoy it, so if I was you I'd switch courses 100%. After that you can fixate on leveraging your contact and landing internships because you'll be in a much better position, hope this helps
P sure JPM is one of the banks that has v strict anti-nepotism rules so ur contact won't be able to do much other than maybe intro u to others at other banks. Doesn't make a huge difference tbh. Change degree tho.
Reply 3
Thanks - I’m definitely feeling quite apprehensive about the whole situation - moving away from what I know into a whole different world. Im worried that I might switch and then really regret it. UoB offer different degrees such as
Economics,
Accounting and Finance
Money Banking and Finance

Which one of these do you feel might be the most beneficial?

I’ve read things about ‘spring week’ and obviously internships - am I going to have to set realistic targets about which companies might offer me these opportunities due to not coming from a top university?
Original post by TobyyyyW
Thanks - I’m definitely feeling quite apprehensive about the whole situation - moving away from what I know into a whole different world. Im worried that I might switch and then really regret it. UoB offer different degrees such as
Economics,
Accounting and Finance
Money Banking and Finance

Which one of these do you feel might be the most beneficial?

I’ve read things about ‘spring week’ and obviously internships - am I going to have to set realistic targets about which companies might offer me these opportunities due to not coming from a top university?


Apply to all of them, its quite random but yeah its gonna be an uphill battle. Your degree doesn't really matter but the last one doesn't sound very academic at all. I'd say either do something in STEM, economics or A&F.
Original post by TobyyyyW
Thanks - I’m definitely feeling quite apprehensive about the whole situation - moving away from what I know into a whole different world. Im worried that I might switch and then really regret it. UoB offer different degrees such as
Economics,
Accounting and Finance
Money Banking and Finance

Which one of these do you feel might be the most beneficial?

I’ve read things about ‘spring week’ and obviously internships - am I going to have to set realistic targets about which companies might offer me these opportunities due to not coming from a top university?

You'll have a chance if you do BSc Economics or BSc Accounting and Finance, they're just more well-rounded courses and you're defo going to be around people applying for spring weeks and internships. Avoid money, banking and finance, doesn't sound great imo, it gives masters in IB vibes

You'll only regret your decision if you're not committed to pursuing a career in the financial services, because that is what your switch of courses is based on (and it's a good one if you do pursue finance). Try not to overthink it and be objective with the goals you want in the future, it'll help you make a steady decision
Reply 6
Thanks a lot!
Original post by astronerd
You'll have a chance if you do BSc Economics or BSc Accounting and Finance, they're just more well-rounded courses and you're defo going to be around people applying for spring weeks and internships. Avoid money, banking and finance, doesn't sound great imo, it gives masters in IB vibes

You'll only regret your decision if you're not committed to pursuing a career in the financial services, because that is what your switch of courses is based on (and it's a good one if you do pursue finance). Try not to overthink it and be objective with the goals you want in the future, it'll help you make a steady decision
econ / a&f are your best bets. goodluck
Original post by astronerd
You'll have a chance if you do BSc Economics or BSc Accounting and Finance, they're just more well-rounded courses and you're defo going to be around people applying for spring weeks and internships. Avoid money, banking and finance, doesn't sound great imo, it gives masters in IB vibes

You'll only regret your decision if you're not committed to pursuing a career in the financial services, because that is what your switch of courses is based on (and it's a good one if you do pursue finance). Try not to overthink it and be objective with the goals you want in the future, it'll help you make a steady decision

What's wrong with a Master's in IB. I plan on doing one at Durham or St. Andrews
Original post by TheSchizoprenic
What's wrong with a Master's in IB. I plan on doing one at Durham or St. Andrews


Its not going to be respected by people on the industry. If you're getting a master's, get a master's in finance or accounting and finance at Oxford, LSE, LBS. Not worth the money otherwise.
Original post by TheSchizoprenic
What's wrong with a Master's in IB. I plan on doing one at Durham or St. Andrews

You'd logically think that banks would want to hire people with more education (i.e. MSc > BSc) but this rarely holds in practice. But it does depend on the degree, the university and the role you're applying for.

Main issue is that a lot of graduate scheme recuitment at IB's is done from people who've done well in their summer internships. This means that people in their final year of undergrad or on master's courses are all fighting for the remaining spaces, as most are filled with internship conversions. I think this is part of why IB recruitment from master's isn't very big but another reason is that master's courses at good UK unis aren't very competitive to get into compared to the competition at undergrad, if you have the money and are decently smart you can generally get into much better unis for a MSc than a BSc, thus having a good master's isn't that strong of a signal for ability, just shows you've got the money.

Also, typically people who do MSc's aim for roles other than IB and are less bothered about the generic IB rat-race. Just an example, in undergrad Econ it feels like everyone is going for IB, yet at MSc level very few people even applied let alone actually started a grad at an IB, most favoured paths like Central Banking, Economic Consulting, Hedge Funds, Academia and Economic Research Firms. Part of me just wonders whether the focus on research in a postgrad course slightly tilts people away from things like IB and Strategy Consulting.

But as another poster suggested, whilst IB hiring out of postgrad isn't big, it does still take place to an extent, but it's even more focused on the very best unis (Oxbridge, LSE and LBS make up most of it, stuff like UCL and Warwick are more semi-targets at postgrad level), but these courses are pretty expensive without scholarships or firm funding. The degree to which IB's hire master's students also depends on the specific roles, so for more STEM roles like Technology, Trading, Quant Research, etc, MSc and PhD students will likely make up more of the graduate cohort than for areas like M&A which are less technical, this is also partly because postgrad is more common in STEM anyway so if they hire STEM then more will naturally have a postgrad.
(edited 1 year ago)

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