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    I'm looking to buy a graphical calculator, and I don't know which to get. Most people at my school seem to have casios, but I like the look of the TI ones which do matrices and stuff.

    This year I'll be taking:

    C3, C4, FP1, FP2, M1, M2, M3, S2

    After this year I won't need to use it again. Which would be best?
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    I have one of the TI's, it was meant to cost about £75. I hate it, I honestly don't use it and stick to my £5 scientific. I would either test one of your friends for ease of use or go for a cheap one that is good enough for the purpose.
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    I have the Casio CFX9850GC+, it's excellent and (more importantly) exam-legal, which cannot by said about many of the TIs.
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    (Original post by tommm)
    I have the Casio CFX9850GC+, it's excellent and (more importantly) exam-legal, which cannot by said about many of the TIs.
    Can it graph inverse hyperbolic functions (including inverses)?
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    Oh gawd no, I just got my TI-84 Plus today, and it's my favorite gadget by far, I'm raving about it
    It solves any integral I throw at it (with limits) and gives me loads of random scientific constants, it graphs anything I like, and solves trig equations so helpfully.
    I would so recommend it.
    Oh, and also, it has all the binomial probability tables in it which is so much easier for Stats

    But don't do what I do and be in such a hurry to open it up that you cut through the USB lead by mistake!
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    Don't bother, working it out yourself will help your understanding.... You won't really use the graph function outside of FP1. We're not allowed to use calculators in any exams at uni.. I wonder why?
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    (Original post by Economist1)
    Can it graph inverse hyperbolic functions (including inverses)?
    It certainly does hyperbolic functions, and probably their inverses too (and if it can't, then just use, for example, \arsinh x = \ln (z + \sqrt{z^2 + 1}) ).
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    (Original post by tommm)
    It certainly does hyperbolic functions, and probably their inverses too (and if it can't, then just use, for example, \arsinh x = \ln (z + \sqrt{z^2 + 1}) ).
    Can it give answers in log form...or is that asking too much of a calculator? What about imaginary numbers / matrices?
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    If by that you mean sinh^-1 et al (Guess who's not a Further Mathematician) then yep
    It just does all the work for me, I'm in love
    EDIT: Ooooh, mine does imaginary numbers and matricies. And there is a way to get answers in log form, I swear I saw it in the instruction booklet
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    (Original post by QuantumTheory)
    If by that you mean sinh^-1 et al (Guess who's not a Further Mathematician) then yep
    It just does all the work for me, I'm in love
    EDIT: Ooooh, mine does imaginary numbers and matricies. And there is a way to get answers in log form, I swear I saw it in the instruction booklet
    AWESOME!! It's not allowed in exams though, is it?
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    Actually QuantumTeory, it might be allowed... http://www.mathsnet.net/asa2/2004/calcspermitted.html.

    Not sure if its only TI-84 or TI-84 plus as well. What's the difference between the two anyway?
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    (Original post by Economist1)
    AWESOME!! It's not allowed in exams though, is it?
    Do examiners really check your calculators?
    :confused: :eek:
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    Nope, it is allowed, at least in mine (AQA) the difference is, I think, just a faster processor, and feeling special because there's a 'plus' at the end.

    When I first saw it, I was so intimidated, but then when I solved an integral, that I would've used Substitution in, in 30 seconds, I was happy as Larry. It's okay though, because it doesn't do it by algebra (kinda, hard to explain)

    And, it has an equation solver. What's not to love?
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    'In general you are never allowed to use a graphic calculator with any of these facilities: data banks, dictionaries, language translators, retrieval of text or formulae, QWERTY keyboards, built-in symbolic algebra manipulations, symbolic differentiation or integration, capability of remote communication with other machines or the World Wide Web.'

    So it is
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    Just looked it up on Wikipedia and apparently there is no such thing as a TI-84; the range is called TI-84 Plus (there's a silver editition as well).

    I'm definitely getting one now!
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    Virtually all graphical calculators give the ability to write basic scripts for whatever purpose, usually to automate functions that would otherwise be tedious and take longer to do manually. Of course, it's only too easy to use this ability to instead save written notes. Bingo - there's your "retrievable text or formulae".

    Having said that, I used the Casio 9750 which, even though it isn't on the list on mathsnet.net, I know is fully permitted by Edexcel.
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    (Original post by QuantumTheory)
    'In general you are never allowed to use a graphic calculator with any of these facilities: data banks, dictionaries, language translators, retrieval of text or formulae, QWERTY keyboards, built-in symbolic algebra manipulations, symbolic differentiation or integration, capability of remote communication with other machines or the World Wide Web.'

    So it is
    well yea that's what it says...but do examiners actually go around and check everyone's calculators then? before the exam?
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    I take both the standard casio fx-85ES and the cfx-9850gc plus graphics calculators into exams. I use the fx for everythings except checking my answers in stats and drawing graphs and checking integration and matrices in pure. I'd never use it for mechanics though. Up to you whether or not an extra couple of marks tops per paper is worth around £50 to you.
 
 
 
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