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Career choice

Im currently in year 12 and im doing physics, maths, chemistry and computer science. Ive initially planned on being a software developer but then i found out that the unemployment rate for CS students is quite high and im rethinking my choice. What would be a good job to have by around the 2030's? i dont mind doing anything tbh, as long as it has a good pay (preferably slightly above average) and a low unemployment rate. here are some jobs ive been considering to do

Software developer
chemist
chemical engineer
any other sort of engineer
Astronomer

but i dont mind doing anything else btw
Original post by -Himaya-
Im currently in year 12 and im doing physics, maths, chemistry and computer science. Ive initially planned on being a software developer but then i found out that the unemployment rate for CS students is quite high and im rethinking my choice. What would be a good job to have by around the 2030's? i dont mind doing anything tbh, as long as it has a good pay (preferably slightly above average) and a low unemployment rate. here are some jobs ive been considering to do

Software developer
chemist
chemical engineer
any other sort of engineer
Astronomer

but i dont mind doing anything else btw

Hi @-Himaya-

It sounds like you have specific interests but an open mind- which is the best situation to be in for looking at career options!

I have been in STEM for a few years now, and even in my (relatively) short time I have seen an increasing reliance on computational skills and disciplines within each area of science.
I’m a biologist, and did some bioinformatics as a part of my undergraduate degree (in Genetics). Now I help out on the Applied Bioinformatics MSc at Cranfield, and am also applying modelling to non-destructive data for reducing food loss and waste as a part of my PhD.

The research and applications of computational chemistry and physics are also expanding. While I definitely am not an expert, I’ve linked below where you can read more about them and see if anything sounds interesting for you.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computational_chemistry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computational_physics#:~:text=Computational%20physics%20is%20the%20study,a%20subset%20of%20computational%20science.

Engineering is such a massive field that it’s not restrictive. There are so many different specialities that you could go into, all of which use different skills and have broad job markets worldwide.
Cranfield has many different engineering MScs that can help people get into the specific field they want, including Computational and Software Techniques in Engineering MSc.
https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/taught/computational-and-software-techniques-in-engineering
There’s also many other options, from Environmental Engineering, to Systems Engineering, to Advanced Mechanical Engineering, and so many more. While these are all postgraduate options, you can browse them here to get an idea of different disciplines:
https://search.cranfield.ac.uk/s/search.html?profile=_default&collection=cranfield-meta&clive=cranfield-courses&gclid=Cj0KCQjwuaiXBhCCARIsAKZLt3mCyRfxYJl2R8HNLzb0kcK5szBwWcqhWCLQtHgc3MFUTFHjfW47ZPUaAjwFEALw_wcB

I hope this helps give you a few ideas, and good luck with your decision!
Ciara
2nd year Agrifood PhD student
Cranfield Student Ambassador
Original post by -Himaya-
Im currently in year 12 and im doing physics, maths, chemistry and computer science. Ive initially planned on being a software developer but then i found out that the unemployment rate for CS students is quite high and im rethinking my choice. What would be a good job to have by around the 2030's? i dont mind doing anything tbh, as long as it has a good pay (preferably slightly above average) and a low unemployment rate. here are some jobs ive been considering to do

Software developer
chemist
chemical engineer
any other sort of engineer
Astronomer

but i dont mind doing anything else btw

The market for software developers (and many other tech positions) is absolutely booming right now. So if you want to a career in it then go for it. Look at degree apprenticeships and other 'earn as you learn' options too though.
Reply 3
thanks a bunch guys, this really helped!:smile:

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