The Student Room Group
Student at the Open University
Open University
Milton Keynes

whats best to do?

Should i do a degree with Open University or do it with a brick and mortar university?

The degrees are similar in nature one is a Cs degree the other is a cs degree with data science?

Would going to a brick and mortar universities open university be a better thing to do?
I think that you should go to Closed University.
Student at the Open University
Open University
Milton Keynes
Reply 2
Original post by Anonymous
Should i do a degree with Open University or do it with a brick and mortar university?

The degrees are similar in nature one is a Cs degree the other is a cs degree with data science?

Would going to a brick and mortar universities open university be a better thing to do?

It depends on what you're looking for. If you want the full "university experience", I'd say a brick uni, as you will get more opportunities to socialise with other students. If you want to be able to study more flexibly around work (or other) commitments, then the OU might be better for that.
Original post by Nerol
It depends on what you're looking for. If you want the full "university experience", I'd say a brick uni, as you will get more opportunities to socialise with other students. If you want to be able to study more flexibly around work (or other) commitments, then the OU might be better for that.


Sorry I should have phrased the question better. I have an option to go to open university or go to a established uni that is doing the same sort of course online. Not sure if I should do the degree in open uni or go to the brick and mortar uni to do the course both are online
Reply 4
Original post by Anonymous
Sorry I should have phrased the question better. I have an option to go to open university or go to a established uni that is doing the same sort of course online. Not sure if I should do the degree in open uni or go to the brick and mortar uni to do the course both are online


The OU doesn't offer a "Computer Science" degree.

If you enrol on Computing (or Computing+Maths, or Data Science, or Computing+EE) and then choose the most maths-heavy and programming-heavy modules available, then it gets fairly close. There are still notable omissions (no compilers course, no computer graphics), but you'll cover CS essentials (algorithms, programming) quite thoroughly and be left in a good position to investigate those extra topics yourself.

I mention this because your description of it as a "CS degree" suggests you might be unaware of this, which in turn would imply you haven't researched it enough.

Which brick uni is it? Can you link the specific courses you're considering?

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