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Master after Medical School

Hello all,

I am a foreign medical school graduate. I've decided to move and start master's, but I need some advice. First, I like medicine, but I want to direct my career to medical-related companies such as pharmaceutical or second choice as any business in management positions.

For that reason, I've decided to do my master's in management, MBA or marketing, etc. I was wondering, how logical is that? After my master's, would it be easy to find a job management position in the UK?

I'm waiting for any kind of advice. Thanks

Not: I graduated and am a citizen of a non-EU Europe country, so I need to take PLAB exams for GMC registration, and as I don't want to be a doctor, it is not an option for me.
Original post by skyface
Hello all,

I am a foreign medical school graduate. I've decided to move and start master's, but I need some advice. First, I like medicine, but I want to direct my career to medical-related companies such as pharmaceutical or second choice as any business in management positions.

For that reason, I've decided to do my master's in management, MBA or marketing, etc. I was wondering, how logical is that? After my master's, would it be easy to find a job management position in the UK?

I'm waiting for any kind of advice. Thanks

Not: I graduated and am a citizen of a non-EU Europe country, so I need to take PLAB exams for GMC registration, and as I don't want to be a doctor, it is not an option for me.


Hi there!

You appear to be in a similar situation to my position a short while ago; After passing my final medicine exams, I had a calamitous personal tragedy, so I decided to branch into the pharmaceutical industry - I already had an intercalated degree in pharmacology, but not being registered with the GOC as I had not completed by "house officer" jobs, I was classed as a non-medic, so started as a medical rep. I later did a masters and then became medical advisor for a small pharma co.

In your case, as, unlike myself, and since you have a predilection towards management, I think they would not consider your medical background as having much advantage in that direction; you would probably need to start off somewhere low-ish, then after establishing a record of some kind, you would probably follow the business/commercial/management aspect of the sector.

In my experience, in UK, a medical degree alone [or any science degree for that matter] counts for less than raw experience from a young age, which explains why some "kids" who cannot even work out in a split-second that 25 X 19 equals 475 OR who cannot tell the difference between discrete and discreet, [just eg-s to illustrate my point] actually become managers of large supermarkets, whereas some highly intelligent people with perhaps a PhD might be struggling to find reasonably paid work.

In a nutshell, whether a masters in a field like business such as MBA would help much to develop a successful career in pharma is questionable. From my own experience, I would advise you to

EITHER: pursue a masters in a subject directly connected with clinical pharmacology [as I did], spend a few years in drug development directly [e.g. lab-based research if you have no great objection to that - I have never had any affinity for such work, so I worked in the field], and THEN take your intended management direction [in contrast, I followed the clinical path];

OR: forget about doing a masters and build a path in pharma straight away initially in a junior role, then seek promotion with mounting experience, which carries more weight as outlined above..

Hope this helps!

M [now medical editor]
Reply 2
Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon
Hi there!

You appear to be in a similar situation to my position a short while ago; After passing my final medicine exams, I had a calamitous personal tragedy, so I decided to branch into the pharmaceutical industry - I already had an intercalated degree in pharmacology, but not being registered with the GOC as I had not completed by "house officer" jobs, I was classed as a non-medic, so started as a medical rep. I later did a masters and then became medical advisor for a small pharma co.

In your case, as, unlike myself, and since you have a predilection towards management, I think they would not consider your medical background as having much advantage in that direction; you would probably need to start off somewhere low-ish, then after establishing a record of some kind, you would probably follow the business/commercial/management aspect of the sector.

In my experience, in UK, a medical degree alone [or any science degree for that matter] counts for less than raw experience from a young age, which explains why some "kids" who cannot even work out in a split-second that 25 X 19 equals 475 OR who cannot tell the difference between discrete and discreet, [just eg-s to illustrate my point] actually become managers of large supermarkets, whereas some highly intelligent people with perhaps a PhD might be struggling to find reasonably paid work.

In a nutshell, whether a masters in a field like business such as MBA would help much to develop a successful career in pharma is questionable. From my own experience, I would advise you to

EITHER: pursue a masters in a subject directly connected with clinical pharmacology [as I did], spend a few years in drug development directly [e.g. lab-based research if you have no great objection to that - I have never had any affinity for such work, so I worked in the field], and THEN take your intended management direction [in contrast, I followed the clinical path];

OR: forget about doing a masters and build a path in pharma straight away initially in a junior role, then seek promotion with mounting experience, which carries more weight as outlined above..

Hope this helps!

M [now medical editor]

Thanks a lot for your reply! It helped me a lot. Since there are really few people who follow this pathway, this message helped me a lot. I am also open to being a medical advisor, or I can even make advertisements for medicines for doctors. But I am not the kind of person who enjoys working in labs. So I was going to ask you if it would be possible to send me a PM and talk there a bit. As a new member, I cannot send a message to you.Thanks :smile:

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