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Does (l) refer to dissolved substances as well as liquid substances?

Hello,

I am an American applying to Cambridge's Natural Sciences course. I did a practice NSAA question today that asked about the equilibrium of an esterification reaction. All of the species in the reaction equation had an (l) for their phase, not (aq). I have learned that (l) refers to substances in the liquid state, while (aq) refers to dissolved substances (for example, NaCl (aq) refers to a solution of dissolved sodium chloride, while NaCl (l) refers to molten sodium chloride). Is (l) also used to refer to dissolved substances? I was wondering if (l) might mean different things in the US than it does in the UK.
Original post by akah245
Hello,

I am an American applying to Cambridge's Natural Sciences course. I did a practice NSAA question today that asked about the equilibrium of an esterification reaction. All of the species in the reaction equation had an (l) for their phase, not (aq). I have learned that (l) refers to substances in the liquid state, while (aq) refers to dissolved substances (for example, NaCl (aq) refers to a solution of dissolved sodium chloride, while NaCl (l) refers to molten sodium chloride). Is (l) also used to refer to dissolved substances? I was wondering if (l) might mean different things in the US than it does in the UK.


They're the same on both sides of the pond. You're correct - and since I'm also American, I pulled this from a British source: In a chemical reaction the symbol 'aq' denotes the aqueous state of the substance and 'l' denotes the liquid state of the substance. The symbol 'aq' means The substance is present in water that is in aqueous medium. The symbol 'l' means The substance present in liquid state (nextgurukul.co.uk)

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