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    (Original post by preciousillusions)
    I take prozac for depression. Is is hard for me to know whether the ed, anxiety and depression would have come without the diabetes or whether the diabetes was the catalyst for it all.

    A lot of people really don't understand how much being diabetic takes over your life, and how much more it is about than testing your blood sugars and injecting, it is deeply psychological too.

    Btw, I actually wrote a chapter for a book that came out recently on my experience with diabulimia.
    Well done! That must have taken a lot
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    Thank you .
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    (Original post by goodLife)
    I don't have diabetes but I get hypoglycemia attacks where I feel nausea, weak and shaky if I don't eat regular. Diabetes type 1 confuses me because if insulin lowers blood sugar and a diabetic fails to take their insulin how can they have an hypo or low blood sugar attack? Or can this only happen when too much insulin is injected?
    Wow, that sounds like me when I was very young. I would keep an eye on it if I was you.

    Got diagnosed on Xmas eve when I was 13. Am 19 now, and luckily I managed to get an insulin pump :-D It makes life so much easier, and I can snack when I want, wherever I want, and quickly give myself a quick bolus of novo rapid :-)
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    (Original post by preciousillusions)
    I take prozac for depression. Is is hard for me to know whether the ed, anxiety and depression would have come without the diabetes or whether the diabetes was the catalyst for it all.

    A lot of people really don't understand how much being diabetic takes over your life, and how much more it is about than testing your blood sugars and injecting, it is deeply psychological too.

    Btw, I actually wrote a chapter for a book that came out recently on my experience with diabulimia.
    i've just started taking prozac myself. has it helped with you?
    i think diabetes was the catalyst for me, i think that if i did not have diabetes, i would not feel so depressed...but who knows ehh.

    what book was it btw? i'm glad that this disorder is finally being recognised a bit more, i just wish the doctors and psychologists were more aware of it.
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    (Original post by Sprockette)
    I haven't been to the hospital in a few months, I think they have my old address or something. The doctor never gives the hospital my new address, I have to change it in every department!? :mad: I don't want to go again, I don't see the point. They just tell you the same stuff over and over. I guess I'll have to get going sometime though... Uhh!
    I recognise this. It feels like that here too. If I wouldn't have had a good HbA1c but a really bad one, I doubt the diabetes team could help me much. There advice is very self-evident sometimes! A typical conversation with the nurse/doctor:

    Doctor: "When do you usually go low?"
    Me: "After meals and physical exercise"
    Doctor: "Then you need to lower your bolus and basal doses"

    It's usually a lot more complicated then the nurse/doctor makes it, depending on the type of exercise, time on the day and so on...

    Also, I hate the cross examination that the nurse is always having with me, she was probably a Stasi agent in her last life, it's none of her business how many times I measure my glucose.

    Plus you need to write down a lot of values before the visit, something that I never do. Another thing I have noticed among ppl with diabetes is that most don't want to show their values when measuring the blood glucose. I sort of like to see the value before everyone else, sometimes I don't want anyone to see the value at all.
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    (Original post by sssjay)
    i've recently just got out of hospital as i had a bad case of DKA which i couldn't control at home (3rd time to be admitted). it was awful, i thought i was going to die. but that still wasn't enough to get me 'better' as days after i came out of hospital i was back to my old ways. i don't really know how to help myself...also, the fact that my parents and docotrs found out what i was doing made everything worse, they just didn't understand !
    i understand the whole up and down eating thing...i'm like that. i ususally just eat what i want (all the fatty stuff) and ignore my injections so i wont put on any of that weight, until my eyes go weird and i just feel like death and i can smell the ketones on my breath, then i inject a HUGE lot of insulin so my blood levels fall dramitcally, sometimes into a hypo. it's awful rreally, yo-yoing my sugar levels Like that.
    i just wish it would go away, i don't know how i can be helped with getting all the mental stuff to go. i know people see me as "stupid" as i am killing myself, to be blunt about it, but i just can't stop


    what's everyones HBa1c's then? mine is god damn awful; 14% :|
    Sounds a bit similar to me really, I've been admitted twice with DKA and both times been sure I'm going to sort it out, but it's just so much hassle . My HBa1c seems to hover around 13-14, in 4 years it's never been lower than about 12. My doctor seems to have finally realised something's up, and he's made me an appointment to see a psychiatrist, he thinks it's a "mental block" stopping me from injecting and it won't improve unless I talk to someone. He's agreed not to tell my parents tho, who are entirely oblivious and think I'm pretty good at the whole diabetes thing. Fools! It usually do a huge injection every couple of days, but I never test my sugars, I haven't in months/ The whole thing just seems like too much annoying hassle .
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    To everyone saying they dont test and inject regularly, please please please talk to someone to help you sort your head out a bit, just dont continue on with high bloods if you can possibly help it

    I had about a few years of completely crap blood sugars, running high a lot, and now i have background retinopathy in my eyes. Hopefully if it gets any worse they can laser it and maintain the level of sight i have now. But the fear of blindness is totally ******* with my mental health. Which is ironic because its only since ive healed from depression that ive actually started looking after the diabetes.

    Diabetes is complete and utter ****.
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    ^thank you for posting that. Like i said i inject a lot more than i used to, but things could still be a lot better. I am going to ring and make an apointment with the diabetic nurse next week .

    I actually have the opposite problem from those who never test their bloods, in that i am obsessed with it and test far too often. I think this is because my sugars are so up and down and i often just feel the need to 'check'. I go through so many testing strips though, it's insane.
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    This thread is really interesting, I became diabetic and went into DKA the week after freshers week right after I started uni a year ago. I've tried so so hard but my condition makes no sense. I inject literally giant doses (20-33) of novarapid (although a few months ago i switched to apidra- which is exactly the same- oh and I take a basal lantus dose daily too), but it takes forever for the insulin to take effect and it only seems to cover a small amount of carbs too. This causes me to go high sugar every single day. A few times as an experiment I have injected a 30 dose without eating anything, and then waited exactly 1 hour before i went hypo- it is so so so annoying.

    The care i received at uni was rubbish but I know quite a lot about metabolism etc and so adjusted my doses etc myself and when all the beta cells were destroyed and it stabilised it became obvious that its really messed up. An experienced diabetes nurse that I contacted at home said in the holidays after a few appointments that what my figures show makes no sense and isnt in any textbooks. These 3 months at uni I've just been "getting by" going high sugar pretty much every day either that or overinjecting for tiny amounts of food and then eating the rest of the food about 2 hours later and that keeps control managable (as in under 18mmol) but is extremely inconvienient. I'm seeing a consultant at xmas hols and hopefully this will sort it but im not that optimistic because unofficially in a chat with diabetes nurse he said he has no idea.

    Edit- oh and im a healthy guy eat lots of fruit and healthy food etc, exercise a lot (talking of which- recently i go hypo every single gym session even when high sugar beforehand- annoying), and am 6ft and weigh 65kg so the huge doses arent because im morbidly obese or anything
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    (Original post by myriad216)
    This thread is really interesting, I became diabetic and went into DKA the week after freshers week right after I started uni a year ago. I've tried so so hard but my condition makes no sense. I inject literally giant doses (20-33) of novarapid (although a few months ago i switched to apidra- which is exactly the same- oh and I take a basal lantus dose daily too), but it takes forever for the insulin to take effect and it only seems to cover a small amount of carbs too. This causes me to go high sugar every single day. A few times as an experiment I have injected a 30 dose without eating anything, and then waited exactly 1 hour before i went hypo- it is so so so annoying.

    The care i received at uni was rubbish but I know quite a lot about metabolism etc and so adjusted my doses etc myself and when all the beta cells were destroyed and it stabilised it became obvious that its really messed up. An experienced diabetes nurse that I contacted at home said in the holidays after a few appointments that what my figures show makes no sense and isnt in any textbooks. These 3 months at uni I've just been "getting by" going high sugar pretty much every day either that or overinjecting for tiny amounts of food and then eating the rest of the food about 2 hours later and that keeps control managable (as in under 18mmol) but is extremely inconvienient. I'm seeing a consultant at xmas hols and hopefully this will sort it but im not that optimistic because unofficially in a chat with diabetes nurse he said he has no idea.

    Edit- oh and im a healthy guy eat lots of fruit and healthy food etc, exercise a lot (talking of which- recently i go hypo every single gym session even when high sugar beforehand- annoying), and am 6ft and weigh 65kg so the huge doses arent because im morbidly obese or anything
    Have you thought about getting an insulin pump? Your story reminds me of myself - I was constantly running high, apart from after exercise when my blood sugar would drop so far I would go hypo. After getting an insulin pump my diabetes is a lot better and much more manageable.
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    (Original post by fordred)
    Have you thought about getting an insulin pump? Your story reminds me of myself - I was constantly running high, apart from after exercise when my blood sugar would drop so far I would go hypo. After getting an insulin pump my diabetes is a lot better and much more manageable.
    I briefly mentioned the idea of getting an insulin pump and diabetes nurse said "not sure its a good idea to go down the pump route yet", but that was the first time I talked to him which was about 5 months ago.
    Its definately a topic I'm going to bring up in my meeting with the consultant at xmas, what should I say to actually get it considered and implemented as a treatment and not just a random idea that read somewhere? How did you go about switching to an insulin pump?
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    (Original post by myriad216)
    I briefly mentioned the idea of getting an insulin pump and diabetes nurse said "not sure its a good idea to go down the pump route yet", but that was the first time I talked to him which was about 5 months ago.
    Its definately a topic I'm going to bring up in my meeting with the consultant at xmas, what should I say to actually get it considered and implemented as a treatment and not just a random idea that read somewhere? How did you go about switching to an insulin pump?
    I can't remember how I got started... I remember nagging my nurse and doctor a lot, and then asking for a person I could contact in NICE. If this still doesn't help, then ask your GP to refer you to a diabetes clinic that do offer pumps. My nurse managed to get me transferred to another local clinic that did do the pumps.
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    (Original post by preciousillusions)
    ^thank you for posting that. Like i said i inject a lot more than i used to, but things could still be a lot better. I am going to ring and make an apointment with the diabetic nurse next week .

    I actually have the opposite problem from those who never test their bloods, in that i am obsessed with it and test far too often. I think this is because my sugars are so up and down and i often just feel the need to 'check'. I go through so many testing strips though, it's insane.
    May I ask how many times a day you test your blood? I'd like to have something to compare with, I suspect I'm doing it way too often, although I usually politely tells the nurse to **** up when she tells me to reduce the testing.
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    ^ i am really not sure, but tell you what, i will count how many times i test tomorrow and let you know .
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    OMG! I'm so ******* sick, and have been that for many days now, it's a massive cold and I cough constantly. It never ends, I'll resort to antibiotics soon, the values has skyrocketed as well. I suspect I've got a dysfunctional immune system, is that common among diabetics? (I know it is quite common among type 2 diabetics)
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    I have the same, flu and I've lost my voice and feel like crap Anything can mess up your levels, pretty sensitive! With some people I guess. Mine have improved over the last week! I wake up at 5/6 (blood sugar, not am) every morning, its amazing!!!

    Your immune system is meant to be not as strong as normal people though... healing 8 times slower and so on. I missed my flu jab so I guess I'm paying for it now
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    I was diagnosed 8 months ago when I was 14. Not fun, although I do love the smell of insulin...:rolleyes:
 
 
 
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