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    Would I be right in thinking that if somebod is lawyer in the US they can do both of the roles as equivelant in the UK e.g. can be both solicitor and barrister without having to decide on one type of route i.e. bvc or lpc?
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    Not quite the same...
    so, i dont think if you qualify @ the american bar that you would be abled to work in UK.
    There's quite a lot (or a few) differences between the US and UK law system.
    just take the degrees themselves: LLB for UK and JD for US. There are however some law modules which are similar(almost). You have to check with American Bar and local bar system for accurate information.
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    (Original post by psl89)
    Not quite the same...
    so, i dont think if you qualify @ the american bar that you would be abled to work in UK.
    There's quite a lot (or a few) differences between the US and UK law system.
    just take the degrees themselves: LLB for UK and JD for US. There are however some law modules which are similar(almost). You have to check with American Bar and local bar system for accurate information.
    Thank for the reply.

    I meant that in the UK you have to pick a route (solicitor or barrister) so I was wondering if it was the same in the USA, or whether the two roles blend into one?
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    Yes you are right, you do not need to pick either or in the US. However, you need to pass the Bar in the specific state in order to represent in courts in that state
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    (Original post by cs428)
    Yes you are right, you do not need to pick either or in the US. However, you need to pass the Bar in the specific state in order to represent in courts in that state
    Oh, ok thanks for the reply.

    Am I right in thinking that you take the bar exam when you join a firm or is there a pre-training period too?
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    You take the bar normally before you join a firm but if you are a summer associate and then they offer you a job you can sometimes start at the firm before you pass the bar - I know from friends that the bar can take up to a year to study for.

    Are you looking to go over to the US? If you are in the UK the best way might be to study and train over here with a US or MC firm and then go over to the states as Law school in America is very expensive and there is no formal training.
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    Although you don't have to choose which course to do and the route to qualification in an individual state is always the same, realistically you still choose whether to be a litigator or a transactional lawyer (basically barrister or solicitor, although litigators in america tend to do the jobs of both the solicitors and the barrister). You can't just "chop and change", if you see what I mean.
 
 
 
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