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Can I be pro-choice while being religious?

Wassup guys,

I’m a young man who has recently decide to go back into religion and re-educate myself. I was born Muslim but never really practiced it until I got into unversity. This is mainly because there are literally no Muslims in my area lol.

To cut a very long story short , I grew up with very liberal values, which I honestly loved because I was able to be friends with anyone and everyone without pre-existing judgment. One of values is that I believe woman deserve to choose what they decide to do. Obviously as a Man, I have no right to tell a woman what to do. I use to think my view was rainbows and sunshine until I told this to one of my new Muslim friends… that was some experience lol.

Basically, abortion is very haram. The fact that I was okay with it means that I’m against my religion according to him.

I’m very torn about what I should do.

I love my morals but I also love my religion.

Also for the record . I am not a angel. I realise that this post may portray me as some kind of weird white knight. I am not at all. I’m just some regular guy who is at a bit of a dilemma.

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Abortion is something that everyone will have an opinion of. That is fine.

What is not fine is to impose your viewpoint on others who do not share your opinion.
You do not walk in their shoes or have a full understanding of their life. You are not their judge or jury.
Yes.
You have the right to choose your own religious affiliation, personal beliefs, how you practice them and your individual priorities.
Ultimately the only one who can sit in judgement of all your thoughts and deeds is God.

If you genuinely believe in the islamic statement of faith about one montheistic God with no partner, descendants or equal and islam's last prophet as his messenger- you are within the fold of islam.
Other people can fiercely disagree with you, oppose your beliefs or affiliation and call you every insult under the sun but you still have the right to choose.

Even the most strict interpretations of fundamentalist Islam are not as harshly opposed to all abortion or contraception as some other religions are.
Of course- there will always be some unhinged fanatics that won't tolerate people holding any alternative opinions & wannabe theocrat dictators in the habit of playing omniscient & omnipotent God who have conviced themselves that they alone have the monopoly on all truth, religion and virtue.
They don't and the reality is that they are far from all knowing or all powerful.
Alas all religions and religious communities have these types.
Good luck!
Original post by londonmyst
Yes.
You have the right to choose your own religious affiliation, personal beliefs, how you practice them and your individual priorities.
Ultimately the only one who can sit in judgement of all your thoughts and deeds is God.

If you genuinely believe in the islamic statement of faith about one montheistic God with no partner, descendants or equal and islam's last prophet as his messenger- you are within the fold of islam.
Other people can fiercely disagree with you, oppose your beliefs or affiliation and call you every insult under the sun but you still have the right to choose.

Even the most strict interpretations of fundamentalist Islam are not as harshly opposed to all abortion or contraception as some other religions are.
Of course- there will always be some unhinged fanatics that won't tolerate people holding any alternative opinions & wannabe theocrat dictators in the habit of playing omniscient & omnipotent God who have conviced themselves that they alone have the monopoly on all truth, religion and virtue.
They don't and the reality is that they are far from all knowing or all powerful.
Alas all religions and religious communities have these types.
Good luck!


This is a very well written response , thanks for the taking the time to write this.

the only issue is that the vast majority of of Muslims I have met so far are ,while not “extreme”, hold the idea that if you are against a supposed value of Islam , then you are not a Muslim. So if you are pro-abortion or gay rights , then you are not a Muslim. Extremely hypocritical because these same Muslims drink,smoke and do everything the religion says not to ,but that’s a different debate altogether.
Original post by Stranger540
This is a very well written response , thanks for the taking the time to write this.

the only issue is that the vast majority of of Muslims I have met so far are ,while not “extreme”, hold the idea that if you are against a supposed value of Islam , then you are not a Muslim. So if you are pro-abortion or gay rights , then you are not a Muslim. Extremely hypocritical because these same Muslims drink,smoke and do everything the religion says not to ,but that’s a different debate altogether.

They have the freedom to choose their opinions & personal priorities, as do everyone else.
Best to quietly and calmly agree to disagree.
At the end of the day, the final decision will rest with God.

But if there is any venom or aggression from individuals that can't tolerate alternative opinions- it is a warning sign of bad apples and highlights the need to avoid all unnecessary interaction with them.
Life is too short to waste your valuable time and energy on those who don't deserve any of either or are destructive bringing little that is positive to your life.
There are plenty of friendly & honest followers of Islam who are not fanatical nor in the habit of attempting to impose on others or play God.
Hi there,
I've moved your thread to a more relevant forum :smile:
Reply 6
Bearing in mind no one really knows if there’s a God or not, where we came from, nor can agree on a faith, religion is best where there is flexibility to go with what works for you. Hopefully laws will represent a sensible consensus on difficult issues like the once you raise
I don't think "embrace your hypocrisy" is really the answer. If you're a Muslim, then be a Muslim - a practicing Muslim. If you don't practice your religion, then put it aside.
Original post by Stranger540
This is a very well written response , thanks for the taking the time to write this.

the only issue is that the vast majority of of Muslims I have met so far are ,while not “extreme”, hold the idea that if you are against a supposed value of Islam , then you are not a Muslim. So if you are pro-abortion or gay rights , then you are not a Muslim. Extremely hypocritical because these same Muslims drink,smoke and do everything the religion says not to ,but that’s a different debate altogether.


haha, totally, right? and they are very happy to cheat in exams too (I mean, not that others who are religious don't, but my experience). anyway, people just pick and choose what they want from religions, say they are religious and live a life of self-delusion.
Original post by squish27
haha, totally, right? and they are very happy to cheat in exams too (I mean, not that others who are religious don't, but my experience). anyway, people just pick and choose what they want from religions, say they are religious and live a life of self-delusion.


I always struggle with Muslims not accepting other Muslims if you don’t want to be homophobic or sexist. It’s someone else’s life, as long as they’re not doing it themselves why can’t you leave them alone rather than judge them and say they’re going to hell? This isn’t about OP in the slightest, it’s going off of what they said about “non-extreme” Muslims they have spoken to. Also other religions do this too like Christianity, but it’s more common in Islam as it’s a bigger religion.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by KirstinTMH
I always struggle with Muslims not accepting other Muslims if you don’t want to be homophobic or sexist. It’s someone else’s life, as long as they’re not doing it themselves why can’t you leave them alone rather than judge them and say they’re going to hell? This isn’t about OP in the slightest, it’s going off of what they said about “non-extreme” Muslims they have spoken to. Also other religions do this too like Christianity, but it’s more common in Islam as it’s a bigger religion.


nah, not really. christianity etc did do it but they have way calmed down now globally actually, i agree with you. we dont have thought police and i wouldnt want it. be homophobic, sexist whatever in your own time. just dont be hypocrital about it, eg being married, Muslim then going round for gay sex anonymously...and remember we have laws in the UK too against acting in such ways, but sure, think what you want in your own time.
Reply 11
As a Muslim who isn’t really an expert but nevertheless think I have good knowledge and a lot of Muslims around me who’d agree, abortion is not “very haram” and there are a lot of circumstances where it would be permitted. I’m Muslim and pro-choice.
Original post by KirstinTMH
I always struggle with Muslims not accepting other Muslims if you don’t want to be homophobic or sexist. It’s someone else’s life, as long as they’re not doing it themselves why can’t you leave them alone rather than judge them and say they’re going to hell?
This isn’t about OP in the slightest, it’s going off of what they said about “non-extreme” Muslims they have spoken to. Also other religions do this too like Christianity, but it’s more common in Islam as it’s a bigger religion.

A lot of religious traditionalists from all different sects & religious communities have hitched their ideological wagon and whole identity to the fundamentalist camp or ultra-traditionalist approach.
Choosing religious absolutism and ancient scriptural/leadership infallibility as the hills that they want to live & die on.

Their attitudes towards those who have alternative interpretations of religion or other personal priorities are frequently very hostile.
Often using inflammatory terms or false allegations to defame those who disagree like: apostate, blasphemer, coward, devil worshipper, fool, godless, idolator, infidel, heretic, hypocrite, lunatic and unbeliever.
Original post by londonmyst
A lot of religious traditionalists from all different sects & religious communities have hitched their ideological wagon and whole identity to the fundamentalist camp or ultra-traditionalist approach.
Choosing religious absolutism and ancient scriptural/leadership infallibility as the hills that they want to live & die on.

Their attitudes towards those who have alternative interpretations of religion or other personal priorities are frequently very hostile.
Often using inflammatory terms or false allegations to defame those who disagree like: apostate, blasphemer, coward, devil worshipper, fool, godless, idolator, infidel, heretic, hypocrite, lunatic and unbeliever.

well, again, it depends what you mean by fundamentalist. Those who burned witches can refer to the Bible for justification (Leciticus) and those who leave the Islamic faith can justify stoning of the apostate. the problem is you can't have this in today's society. but yeh, i totally agree with what you said. problem i think though is that we have these books that say these things coz you can ALWAYS justify what you want to do by reference to a holy book. regardless, eg i have seen Islamic arguments for an against drinking by reference to theological text ( I am not arguing one way or the other, just saying it exists) :-)
Yeah. I’m pro-choice and religious. Personally, it’s entirely up to you and being pro-choice is gonna be controversial but don’t let anyone shame you for that
Original post by squish27
well, again, it depends what you mean by fundamentalist. Those who burned witches can refer to the Bible for justification (Leciticus) and those who leave the Islamic faith can justify stoning of the apostate. the problem is you can't have this in today's society. but yeh, i totally agree with what you said. problem i think though is that we have these books that say these things coz you can ALWAYS justify what you want to do by reference to a holy book. regardless, eg i have seen Islamic arguments for an against drinking by reference to theological text ( I am not arguing one way or the other, just saying it exists) :-)

In theology & religious studies the "fundamentalist camp" and "fundamentalist approach" to religion is based upon a definition that includes 3 or 4 core criteria:

1) Scriptural infallibility of ancient religious texts/books or alleged collections of original and ancient leadership pronouncements,
2) The literal interpretation to the content of all books of scripture and leadership pronouncements,
3) Infallibility of all the ancient leaders/many of the ancient leaders considered to be most significant as prophets/final prophet/pope or all positively regarded faith leaders whether living or deceased for hundreds of years.
4) Sometimes the inerrancy of one holy text translation or published version.
This tends to apply more to christianity than any other religion, usually is used in relation to the biblical inerrancy of the King James bible version in the english language.

It is important to note that it is not just ancient religions that have a large or very strict fundamentalist camp.
Newer religions less than 150 years old like scientology do too.
yeh, ok. I just don't get involved in theological arguments. i find them a complete waste of time. there's no single authority on theology....i'm not saying you're wrong on the above, btw.

religions, ok; they can be quite interesting anthropologically; but people take what they want from whatever holy book they subscribe to and forget the bad bits (but then again, even fundamentalists - however you interpret that - see the "bad bits" as good bits...so, we'll be here all day....)
Pro-choice and religion shouldn't have to have any separation
Original post by Jas - Luna
Pro-choice and religion shouldn't have to have any separation

Often the priority within a strict religion over a thousand years old is emphasizing the need for followers to instinctively obey the religion's teachings and encourage others to do so.
Religious dogmatism, practical traditions, scriptural quotes and ancient leadership pronouncements & precedents frequently do not give the impression of viewing every individuals right to choose for themselves with a friendly eye.
Sometimes even encouraging the use of intense coercion or physical force to punish those who disobey and ignore religious restrictions/demands.
oh come on; enoguh with religion alraedy....it was understandable at least 200 years ago; now it's ridiculous.

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