The Student Room Group

law degree or non law degree

hey everyone :') having another crisis and would appreciate some advice haha

so basically ive been wanting to have a career in law for couple of years now since lots of aspects of the job interest me. i was going to do a law degree and i think i would do well in it however now im thinking of doing a japanese and chinese degree or something along those lines and doing a conversion course after it

i really am interesting in law and i dont think me wanting to do a non-law degree instead suggests that im not. its just that i really love learning languages-im hoping to be at an intermediate level at french and korean by the end of the summer.

i just think that maybe it would be better for me to do something im super passionate abt (languages) at uni (considering the time and the cost that would go into it) and then go into a career in law (which is what im interested in the most)

note: im also applying for a couple of degree apprenticeships in law

im just wondering if it would enhance my chances of getting a job at a good law firm (maybe a mc or one of the top american ones) if i just stuck with a law degree or if i would have the same chances by doing a non-law degree then a conversion course? just a bit worried that it might come across as if i took the 'easier' path and therefore may look like im acc not that passionate abt law at all, especially since i know im doing a non-law degree w the intention of doing a conversion course and stuff yk? (ik all uni degrees are hard just worried how other may see it)
Original post by TazmeenX
hey everyone :') having another crisis and would appreciate some advice haha

so basically ive been wanting to have a career in law for couple of years now since lots of aspects of the job interest me. i was going to do a law degree and i think i would do well in it however now im thinking of doing a japanese and chinese degree or something along those lines and doing a conversion course after it

i really am interesting in law and i dont think me wanting to do a non-law degree instead suggests that im not. its just that i really love learning languages-im hoping to be at an intermediate level at french and korean by the end of the summer.

i just think that maybe it would be better for me to do something im super passionate abt (languages) at uni (considering the time and the cost that would go into it) and then go into a career in law (which is what im interested in the most)

note: im also applying for a couple of degree apprenticeships in law

im just wondering if it would enhance my chances of getting a job at a good law firm (maybe a mc or one of the top american ones) if i just stuck with a law degree or if i would have the same chances by doing a non-law degree then a conversion course? just a bit worried that it might come across as if i took the 'easier' path and therefore may look like im acc not that passionate abt law at all, especially since i know im doing a non-law degree w the intention of doing a conversion course and stuff yk? (ik all uni degrees are hard just worried how other may see it)


Hi. I am also going to apply to university soon and had a similar dilemma to you (I was thinking of applying to study politics) but have finally settled on law after many months of going back and forth. From what I've heard, some top firms prefer students to do Law degrees, most are completely neutral and a few actually prefer students to do a non-law degree. Therefore, if you really want to study languages at university you may as well go for it. If you're still worried though, you could also consider doing a Law degree but with a year abroad. I'm not sure how many unis offer them in Asian countries as Europe tends to be a more popular destination from what I've gathered, but I know that UCL offers a Law degree where you can spend one year in Hong Kong or Singapore.
Reply 2
Original post by poppy2022
Hi. I am also going to apply to university soon and had a similar dilemma to you (I was thinking of applying to study politics) but have finally settled on law after many months of going back and forth. From what I've heard, some top firms prefer students to do Law degrees, most are completely neutral and a few actually prefer students to do a non-law degree. Therefore, if you really want to study languages at university you may as well go for it. If you're still worried though, you could also consider doing a Law degree but with a year abroad. I'm not sure how many unis offer them in Asian countries as Europe tends to be a more popular destination from what I've gathered, but I know that UCL offers a Law degree where you can spend one year in Hong Kong or Singapore.


ahhh oki oki thank youuuu. im not sure if youll know but is there a website or something where i can see which law firms prefer law degrees/non law degrees? also were there any other reasons as to why you chose law over politics?
Original post by TazmeenX
ahhh oki oki thank youuuu. im not sure if youll know but is there a website or something where i can see which law firms prefer law degrees/non law degrees? also were there any other reasons as to why you chose law over politics?

npp
No idk of any website. The main reason why I went with Law over Politics is that ik that while I find politics more interesting now, when it comes to doing a degree I’ll be more motivated if I know it links directly to a career
I personally don't see much of a disadvantage in choosing a non-law degree over a law degree, per say. A law degree doesn't necessarily points directly towards a career; there are many law graduates who don't work in the legal industry, whether it was never in their interest or the industry is just competitive. Likewise, the GDL is always a popular option which shouldn't disadvantage anyone in any way to be honest.

Perhaps if you got the opportunity, it's best to find out what do you learn in a law degree of whichever institution that you're interested in and how do they asses them (essay questions and problem-based questions). Don't base your entire decision based on one criterion if you can.
Original post by TazmeenX
hey everyone :') having another crisis and would appreciate some advice haha

so basically ive been wanting to have a career in law for couple of years now since lots of aspects of the job interest me. i was going to do a law degree and i think i would do well in it however now im thinking of doing a japanese and chinese degree or something along those lines and doing a conversion course after it

i really am interesting in law and i dont think me wanting to do a non-law degree instead suggests that im not. its just that i really love learning languages-im hoping to be at an intermediate level at french and korean by the end of the summer.

i just think that maybe it would be better for me to do something im super passionate abt (languages) at uni (considering the time and the cost that would go into it) and then go into a career in law (which is what im interested in the most)

note: im also applying for a couple of degree apprenticeships in law

im just wondering if it would enhance my chances of getting a job at a good law firm (maybe a mc or one of the top american ones) if i just stuck with a law degree or if i would have the same chances by doing a non-law degree then a conversion course? just a bit worried that it might come across as if i took the 'easier' path and therefore may look like im acc not that passionate abt law at all, especially since i know im doing a non-law degree w the intention of doing a conversion course and stuff yk? (ik all uni degrees are hard just worried how other may see it)


taking a non law or law route will not matter. Within top law firms e.g magic circle and silver circle its mainly the uni you attend that matters.Firms split the amount of training contracts they offer typically 50/50 between non law and law graduates.
The advice until now was that big law firms have about 50% of people with an LLB and 50% not. That is likely to remain the case. So it does not matter. BUT now that you do not need a qualifying law degree under the SQE system bit firms are putting people who don't have an LLB through a 2 term PGDL and then SQWE1 and then enhanced SQE2 course and exams (and the 2 year training contract). In other words doing a law conversion if you don't have an LLB is likely to remain important. That takes us on to money. You are allowed one student loan company masters loan only (unless you are the rare person whose post grad is paid by a law firm). If you do an LLB first then all you might then need that loan for would be an enhanced SQE1 and 2 with electives course (and exams) whilst looking for a TC or QWE. So having the LLB does make it a bit easier afterwards.

On the other hand you might get into a better university doing a subject easier to get into than law, but you still need high A level grades for law so that is not the end of the story really.

I would say do the LLB if you want to be a lawyer (I did).

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending