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    Hi there!

    I have been considering becoming a lecturer or teacher of history lately but . . .

    I am doing a degree in History and Economics - can I still get onto an MA course in history with that?

    Also, once you have done a PhD in whatever subject, how do you become a professor of that subject?

    Thanks!
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    Yes, you can.
    After your PhD, you need to secure a postdoc position (which as I understand it, though I may be wrong, apparently entails working on a project of a more established professor and doing some teaching as well). After that, you can then chase after 'proper' lecturing positions.
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    Also, once you have done a PhD in whatever subject, how do you become a professor of that subject?
    Professors tend to be the heads within departments I believe. I think you have to work your way up the academic ladder fater you've got your Phd to be a professor.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Yes, you can.
    After your PhD, you need to secure a postdoc position (which as I understand it, though I may be wrong, apparently entails working on a project of a more established professor and doing some teaching as well). After that, you can then chase after 'proper' lecturing positions.
    Hey, I'm doing my BA at Exeter! I take it you can move to Oxford to do an MA then (since that is what you are doing)? What do you have to do in order to secure a place there?

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    (Original post by HappinessHappening)
    Hey, I'm doing my BA at Exeter! I take it you can move to Oxford to do an MA then (since that is what you are doing)? What do you have to do in order to secure a place there?

    Get a good 2.1 or above and beat the competition.

    (Original post by Vincente)
    Professors tend to be the heads within departments I believe. I think you have to work your way up the academic ladder fater you've got your Phd to be a professor.
    Well, that's not quite true. HODs are very rarely anything other than professors, but that's just because prof is the most senior academic rank (postdoc > fellow > junior lecturer > lecturer > senior lecturer > reader > professor). You get promoted up the ranks as a result of the research you produce.
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    I take it you can move to Oxford to do an MA
    I don't think you can get an Oxford MA for a postgraduate course.....I thought you only get a Mphil.
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    postdoc > fellow > junior lecturer > lecturer > senior lecturer > reader > professor
    Sorry but what does a 'reader' do? Is it just an another term for a senior reseacher?
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    (postdoc > fellow > junior lecturer > lecturer > senior lecturer > reader > professor).
    What? A fellow is below a junior lecturer?? Are you sure?? At Cambridge the fellows are the big guns who everyone else looks up to....waaaay better than regular lecturers.
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    (Original post by HappinessHappening)
    Hi there!

    I have been considering becoming a lecturer or teacher of history lately but . . .

    I am doing a degree in History and Economics - can I still get onto an MA course in history with that?

    Also, once you have done a PhD in whatever subject, how do you become a professor of that subject?

    Thanks!

    I really respect guys who wants to become a teacher or an educator, i think it's one of the best contribution a man can give to the human race..imo anyways My mom really disapproved if a guy becomes a teacher or educator, seems to her we would not get the 'good' money if we became one she thinks women should become the teacher or educator, meh I don't want to argue with her, love her to bits :cool:

    Going back to how become a lecturer, i don't know about other Universities but here if you have a BSc or BA you can apply to become a lecturer but they will not let you lecturer immediately. Your post will become "Assistant Lecturer". So your job now are assisting full time lecturer + wait until the Uni send you to continue your MSc or MA (which they will pay of course ) Then after you complete your MSc or MA, you can start to do lectures.

    As for PhD, when you got your PhD you will not be a Prof immediately, first you get the "Dr." title. After you publish some research paper then you become Assoc Prof and letter after you publish more paper (and by this time you've become Old and wrinkly already), you'll get your Prof title.

    Well that's what i understand about it. Hope it helps
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    (Original post by jcb914)
    What? A fellow is below a junior lecturer?? Are you sure?? At Cambridge the fellows are the big guns who everyone else looks up to....waaaay better than regular lecturers.
    I'm talking about teaching or research fellows, Oxbridge excluded since I believe every tenured member of the colleges is a fellow?. It's possible to go straight to a fellowship or even a lecturship without doing a post-doc year (funded year undertaking your own research) but it's unusual.

    (Original post by Vincente)
    Sorry but what does a 'reader' do? Is it just an another term for a senior reseacher?
    Yes, it's just jargon
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    (Original post by HappinessHappening)
    Hey, I'm doing my BA at Exeter! I take it you can move to Oxford to do an MA then (since that is what you are doing)?
    Did do - I graduated from Oxford this September

    (Original post by HappinessHappening)
    What do you have to do in order to secure a place there?

    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Get a good 2.1 or above and beat the competition.
    This, hehe. Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions

    (Original post by vincente)
    I don't think you can get an Oxford MA for a postgraduate course.....I thought you only get a Mphil.
    Or an MSt. In Oxford the MPhil is their two-year master's course, while the MSt is just one year (I did the latter).
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Or an MSt. In Oxford the MPhil is their two-year master's course, while the MSt is just one year (I did the latter).
    They also offer 1-year MScs for sciences and social sciences, with the MSts for arts and humanities :yep:
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    Lecturers, for the top uni's at least, would need to possess a PhD in the subject they want to lecture in. Come to think of, if you wanted to lecture at the top uni's you'd probably have to do a good bit of research either prior to taking up a lectureship or take up a post-doc research associate/assistant role whilst lecturing.

    Getting professorships are tough; can't put a rough figure on it, but it takes years of top-quality, world-renowned research into your subject field. Some unis advertise professor positions where you'd get given the title or I suppose you'd get given it by your uni.
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    All the inequality signs are the wrong way round, tbf.
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    All the inequality signs are the wrong way round, tbf.
    They're meant to be arrows, not inequality signs.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    I've never heard of the term junior lecturer being applied, as far as I know new lecturers are just called lecturers? Maybe it differs from place to place?
    I've only seen it in a couple of places, IIRC. So you're right, I probably should have left it out - as you say, if all the permutations are in there, it would be a very long list!

    (Original post by RobbieC)
    All the inequality signs are the wrong way round, tbf.
    This is true. I was typing quickly. Sorry :o: I was thinking of them as arrows in career progression. The tread was originally in general discussion and a few of the answers were drastically wrong, so I was just trying to bang something out that was approximately correct!
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    All the inequality signs are the wrong way round, tbf.
    it seems they were intended to be arrows.
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    This is true. I was typing quickly. Sorry :o: I was thinking of them as arrows in career progression. The tread was originally in general discussion and a few of the answers were drastically wrong, so I was just trying to bang something out that was approximately correct!
    3 quotations in about a minute! Crikey.

    Yeah I did realise of course, but was just being my pedantic self! I do wonder why they use the term reader as such a prestigious title. I can read, tbh, and thus want to be revered as an academic... but I bet they won't revere me:nah:
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    3 quotations in about a minute! Crikey.

    Yeah I did realise of course, but was just being my pedantic self! I do wonder why they use the term reader as such a prestigious title. I can read, tbh, and thus want to be revered as an academic... but I bet they won't revere me:nah:
    :rofl:

    How about claiming to be a reader (you might need a fake moustache, a pipe and a big hat to pull it off), and if challenged, explaining that you're reading for a degree? :p:
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    The career structure is very flexible. Certainly at Oxford and Cambridge it isn't always necessary to have completed a PhD (at least in non-science disciplines) before securing an academic appointment.

    Some faculties and departments have a long tradition of recruiting PhD students part way through their studies; they then complete their PhD at the same time as giving supervisions/tutorials and lectures.
 
 
 
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