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    (Original post by Joluk)
    Anyone see Prime Minister's questions? Pretty cheap of Brown to accuse Cameron of playing party politics, he seems to say that every time someone makes a legitimate criticism of his government's failings.
    Spot on!
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    (Original post by DanGrover)
    Not really political, is it?
    Well seens as the Government system let him down, YES
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    (Original post by IanDangerously)
    *yawn* ... this again?

    how spiteful...if your not interested why join the thread?? *yawn* people like you * yawn *
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    of all of the kids in the country, i think social services do a pretty awesome job with what limited funds and resources they have.

    There will always be failings in the system.
    Yet again it was a lack of communication between nhs, social workers and police - if they'd all come together, perhaps this wouldnt happen - exactly the same as in Victoria Climbie's case.
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    (Original post by Ascient)
    The fact that three staff members were officially warned suggests at least some negligence on their part.

    Re the infringement of their personal freedom: I think you have to remember that for the vast, vast majority of parents this won't be an issue at all because there is very little suspicion over them at all. Where I do think a 'safety first' policy should be taken is when there is reasonable doubt, such as repeated, 'non-accidental' bruising, rather than waiting for 100% clear evidence. Take the children away and do the full investigation after. That way, it will be the cases where the parents are at least a bit guilty who are 'punished' rather than just any random parent.
    You do realise this is actually what happened, right?

    On Dec 11, the doctors first suggest "non-accidental" bruising - Although bruising had been noted on one occasion before this, as I have previously said we have no idea how that bruising occured and could havew been accidental, or could have been synonomous with the reasoning mother gave.
    Dec 15th - Baby P taken into care.
    Dec 19th - Investigation launched.
    Dec 22nd - Child protection - Baby P is added to register
    Jan 26th - Investigation proves "inconclusive" and baby P is returned.

    So, your argument is flawed. The system already works in this way.
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    (Original post by suicidal_dream)
    of all of the kids in the country, i think social services do a pretty awesome job with what limited funds and resources they have.

    There will always be failings in the system.
    Yet again it was a lack of communication between nhs, social workers and police - if they'd all come together, perhaps this wouldnt happen - exactly the same as in Victoria Climbie's case.
    This, again, is actually untrue. The protocols taken from Every Child Matters (the report issued post-Climbie) actually helped this child for a while. The doctor noted injuries, he notified Social Services, SS notified police. This is exactly the guidelines that EVC put in place; That authorities talk to each other.

    What happened was the doctors (and possibly social services in some peoples eyes) did not do their jobs right.

    IMHO, Every Child Matters gave this boy extra time and a chance; The failings of doctors killed him.
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    You do realise this is actually what happened, right?

    On Dec 11, the doctors first suggest "non-accidental" bruising - Although bruising had been noted on one occasion before this, as I have previously said we have no idea how that bruising occured and could havew been accidental, or could have been synonomous with the reasoning mother gave.
    Dec 15th - Baby P taken into care.
    Dec 19th - Investigation launched.
    Dec 22nd - Child protection - Baby P is added to register
    Jan 26th - Investigation proves "inconclusive" and baby P is returned.

    So, your argument is flawed. The system already works in this way.
    That doesn't make my argument flawed.
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    You do realise this is actually what happened, right?

    On Dec 11, the doctors first suggest "non-accidental" bruising - Although bruising had been noted on one occasion before this, as I have previously said we have no idea how that bruising occured and could havew been accidental, or could have been synonomous with the reasoning mother gave.
    Dec 15th - Baby P taken into care.
    Dec 19th - Investigation launched.
    Dec 22nd - Child protection - Baby P is added to register
    Jan 26th - Investigation proves "inconclusive" and baby P is returned.

    So, your argument is flawed. The system already works in this way.
    The system already works in this way?
    Am I the only person to think this sentence is very wrong? Quite obviously it didn't work
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    I personally am angry at the mother and her boyfriend. I find it difficult to get too angry at the authorities because I would not do their job. It's a very difficult job, that I know from people who do it. Perhaps if all those people who are so outraged and hurt by this went into that career there would be fewer incidents like this. They're not exactly swimming in social workers, nor does the job take skills that most people would say they don't have.
    If you care so much, do the job. :dontknow:
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    I think it's time we followed America in taking social workers to court for child neglect in these cases. I hate the term 'collective responsbility' because that often means nothing changes. Bit of a stern talking too, a few written warnings, we are told it will never happen again remember Climbie? yet it still does. I think we also need to look on who we are recruiting as social workers , as I don't think a mere professional qualification is enough.I think that 'shoesmith' witch has some nerve arrogantly claiming she will not be resigning. I'd have her head for one.

    I think especially when dealing with certain troubled families we need social workers who have experience of life and are not shy in taking on the parents no matter how intimidating they are. I think there also needs to be an investigation of all the red tape as apparently social workers has asked about the legality of removing the boy but were told there were not enough grounds. Despite numerous hospital visits with injuries ,Police involvement and upwards of sixty visits. Personally I could not be a social worker if I could not fracture a rule or two to save a child.
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    (Original post by Spazzycazzy)
    The system already works in this way?
    Am I the only person to think this sentence is very wrong? Quite obviously it didn't work
    You're taking "works" in the wrong context. :p: I mean "works" as in the way something works" (Like a door works by swinging on hinges), not "works" as in doing a good job.
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    (Original post by charli159)
    how spiteful...if your not interested why join the thread?? *yawn* people like you * yawn *
    Well, I was expecting an interesting discussion but only found another "zomg Im crying this is so awful wah wah ***** moan wail"-fest
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    Regarding some poster hating the term, 'collective responsibility', there's alot of collectiveness (sic?!) involved in social work. It's a multi-discipline/team approach to dealing with cases. The buck stops with quite a few people/teams etc...

    I've recently started an MA in Social Work, and Children and families social work does seem a frightening prospect. It's not an area of social work that interests me.

    The more i read/hear about the profession, the more I understand how badly funded social services are, problems of being understaffed and overworked and the lack of a support/supervisory infrastructure. No wonder there are troubles over recruitment and retainment.

    This Baby P case: from what i've read, the fault lies with various people/agencies. I think much fault lies with the doctor, the baby had a broken spine and a few other physical injuries, yet came to the decision the baby had flu and was a bit miserable??!!! And it goes without saying the despicable actions of those involved in the treatment of Baby P.

    What have i got myself into?!
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    Regarding some poster hating the term, 'collective responsibility', there's alot of collectiveness (sic?!) involved in social work. It's a multi-discipline/team approach to dealing with cases. The buck stops with quite a few people/teams etc...

    I've recently started an MA in Social Work, and Children and families social work does seem a frightening prospect. It's not an area of social work that interests me.

    The more i read/hear about the profession, the more I understand how badly funded social services are, problems of being understaffed and overworked and the lack of a support/supervisory infrastructure. No wonder there are troubles over recruitment and retainment.

    This Baby P case: from what i've read, the fault lies with various people/agencies. I think much fault lies with the doctor, the baby had a broken spine and a few other physical injuries, yet came to the decision the baby had flu and was a bit miserable??!!! And it goes without saying the despicable actions of those involved in the treatment of Baby P.

    What have i got myself into?!
    P

    Baby P, how could anyone treat him like that?
    Miss the injuries he sustained.
    Be fooled by his lying, vile mother and her evil boy friend.
    Return him to his disgusting filthy home.

    All the more distressing that some images of him have been released, he isn't an anonymous ,amorphous being anymore, but a defenceless child who endured unspeakable misery.
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    Yes, its disgusting that they let it happen, and a doctor not realising his back was broken? Takes the piss beyond belief. People who do things like that to kids; lock them up and throw away the key.
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    Incompetent local government and decentralisation in the wrong area. This wasn't a case of abuse going under the radar, but government neglect.
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    After reading excessive amounts about Baby P on Google and watching various postings on YouTube, I am extremely upset and have shed a tear or two about the situation. This kind of behaviour from the mother, her boyfriend, his friend and his girlfriend is by no means acceptable on any level. I am shocked that there are people in our society who feel they have the need to committ such a terrible crime! I am appauled. At the age of 17, ironically, I am currently applying to do a social work degree and reading about those social workers involved has really fascinated me in wondering whether they were doing their job efficiently or not. However, I do empathsise with them greatly at this moment in time as they are bound to feel terrible.
    All that's left to say is, RIP Baby P, you are now in the best place for you little one.
 
 
 
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