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Got a 2.2 because of depression and adhd

I feel like a complete failure for graduating with a 2.2 (bsc chemistry) and I don't know what to do from now on. I've been trying to get help for the depression but the damage had already been done. 2nd year was really bad and being stuck inside cause of corona made it worse but I tried that much harder in 3rd year despite things not getting better and now that I'm graduating I've finally been diagnosed with adhd. I had been waiting for a screening and unfortunately both my uni and my department couldn't help me without an official diagnosis so I was studying nearly 7 days a week all year in 3rd year but it still wasn't enough. Do you understand how **** it feels working so much more than others just to compensate for your brain not functioning normally? This obviously didn't help with the depression either. I guess what I'm trying to ask is will employers understand that I had mitigating circumstances and couldn't get help for them? But ig they wouldn't want someone with mental illness on their team anyway. If I do a masters and get a 2.1 or first will this improve my employability? Will I even be able to get into a good masters program without a 2.1?? If anyone has been in a similar situation to me and is doing alright right now I'd love to hear it because I'm feeling really defeated right now
I got psychosis in third year and then an autism diagnosis this year. I'm heading towards a 2:2 too but I dropped out after the first semester of fourth year whilst knowing this. So I'm left with a BSc. What do you think looks better? A BSc or an honours degree? I also studied 7 days a week in third year but my grades were still mediocre.
They're not allowed to stigmatise you for your mental health.
Original post by Idklmaoo
I feel like a complete failure for graduating with a 2.2 (bsc chemistry) and I don't know what to do from now on. I've been trying to get help for the depression but the damage had already been done. 2nd year was really bad and being stuck inside cause of corona made it worse but I tried that much harder in 3rd year despite things not getting better and now that I'm graduating I've finally been diagnosed with adhd. I had been waiting for a screening and unfortunately both my uni and my department couldn't help me without an official diagnosis so I was studying nearly 7 days a week all year in 3rd year but it still wasn't enough. Do you understand how **** it feels working so much more than others just to compensate for your brain not functioning normally? This obviously didn't help with the depression either. I guess what I'm trying to ask is will employers understand that I had mitigating circumstances and couldn't get help for them? But ig they wouldn't want someone with mental illness on their team anyway. If I do a masters and get a 2.1 or first will this improve my employability? Will I even be able to get into a good masters program without a 2.1?? If anyone has been in a similar situation to me and is doing alright right now I'd love to hear it because I'm feeling really defeated right now


At a time when your mental health impacted you the most, you gave it your all as much as you feel down always look towards the bright side and be proud of yourself, because things could have been worse coming out with something worse than 2:2. The only similar situation I’m on is being on a break away from my partner who’s currently stressed out over her mental health, there’s been a lot of dried up communication ever since and I miss her ever so much. 💔
Well, the first thing that I should say is that a 2.2 is not a fail. You still have plenty of options even with a 2.2. When I was applying for graduate jobs I have seen plenty of jobs that ask for a 2.2 as a minimum or accept candidates with any grades. It is true that a 2.1 will keep more doors open, but a 2.2 is also not going to completely limit your options. Also, a lot of the times, employers do consider mitigating circumstances when they ask for your degree classification, so that is usually taken into consideration.

But another thing that I want to say is that employers actually don't place as much emphasis on degree classifications. I have recently applied for a role which required a 2.1 and they didn't even ask me to provide them with a transcript or a certificate or any evidence that shows that this is what I have achieved. They just ask if you have it and that's it. Your grade is only used for the initial screening, but what matters more is your motivation, skills gained during university and your overall preparation for interviews e.g using the STAR technique for competency based questions and making sure that you can answer the most common interview questions fluently. Some companies will be more strict about the grade, but honestly, if the company uses degree grades as a measure of someone's ability to do the job then they're complete idiots and not worth your time anyway. One company did ask me for a final degree mark, but honestly it's dumb, because we all study different subjects.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 5
Original post by GeolPhysics
I got psychosis in third year and then an autism diagnosis this year. I'm heading towards a 2:2 too but I dropped out after the first semester of fourth year whilst knowing this. So I'm left with a BSc. What do you think looks better? A BSc or an honours degree? I also studied 7 days a week in third year but my grades were still mediocre.


What do you mean bsc or honours? I didn't even know there were different levels of bsc ? But honestly if you are not feeling mentally good I think dropping out or just deferring is the best. I regret not deferring in my 2nd year.
Reply 6
Original post by Mohammed_80
At a time when your mental health impacted you the most, you gave it your all as much as you feel down always look towards the bright side and be proud of yourself, because things could have been worse coming out with something worse than 2:2. The only similar situation I’m on is being on a break away from my partner who’s currently stressed out over her mental health, there’s been a lot of dried up communication ever since and I miss her ever so much. 💔


Thank you and I hope things get better for your partner too🥲
Original post by Idklmaoo
I feel like a complete failure for graduating with a 2.2 (bsc chemistry) and I don't know what to do from now on. I've been trying to get help for the depression but the damage had already been done. 2nd year was really bad and being stuck inside cause of corona made it worse but I tried that much harder in 3rd year despite things not getting better and now that I'm graduating I've finally been diagnosed with adhd. I had been waiting for a screening and unfortunately both my uni and my department couldn't help me without an official diagnosis so I was studying nearly 7 days a week all year in 3rd year but it still wasn't enough. Do you understand how **** it feels working so much more than others just to compensate for your brain not functioning normally? This obviously didn't help with the depression either. I guess what I'm trying to ask is will employers understand that I had mitigating circumstances and couldn't get help for them? But ig they wouldn't want someone with mental illness on their team anyway. If I do a masters and get a 2.1 or first will this improve my employability? Will I even be able to get into a good masters program without a 2.1?? If anyone has been in a similar situation to me and is doing alright right now I'd love to hear it because I'm feeling really defeated right now


Hey Idklmaoo

You have had what sounds like an incredibly hard couple of years, and still came out with a 2:2?! That is an amazing accomplishment and something that in time I hope you will come to be proud of!

Not every prospective employer will be great about it unfortunately, but in my experience there are lots of amazing opportunities out there for people who can demonstrate ability beyond the results on their paper. There are also lots of places who would be more than happy with a 2:2!

Getting an ADHD diagnosis can be difficult, but I would encourage you to pursue this with your GP. Many employers also offer Employee Assistance Programmes with trained counsellors included who might be able to help you in the pursuit of this too, so it's something to bear in mind.

If you have not already, try reaching out to Depression Alliance on 0845 123 2320 - they provide information and support to those who are affected by depression via publications, supporter services and a network of self-help groups. You might find some use from them too.

You got this! Wishing you all the best of luck
Lee
Student Minds
Reply 8
Original post by hppav
Well, the first thing that I should say is that a 2.2 is not a fail. You still have plenty of options even with a 2.2. When I was applying for graduate jobs I have seen plenty of jobs that ask for a 2.2 as a minimum or accept candidates with any grades. It is true that a 2.1 will keep more doors open, but a 2.2 is also not going to completely limit your options. Also, a lot of the times, employers do consider mitigating circumstances when they ask for your degree classification, so that is usually taken into consideration.

But another thing that I want to say is that employers actually don't place as much emphasis on degree classifications. I have recently applied for a role which required a 2.1 and they didn't even ask me to provide them with a transcript or a certificate or any evidence that shows that this is what I have achieved. They just ask if you have it and that's it. Your grade is only used for the initial screening, but what matters more is your motivation, skills gained during university and your overall preparation for interviews e.g using the STAR technique for competency based questions and making sure that you can answer the most common interview questions fluently. Some companies will be more strict about the grade, but honestly, if the company uses degree grades as a measure of someone's ability to do the job then they're complete idiots and not worth your time anyway. One company did ask me for a final degree mark, but honestly it's dumb, because we all study different subjects.


Thank you I really needed this🥲 I know realistically a 2.2 is not a bad grade! and that I am likely overreacting... but when you grow up with good grades, with a family that expects it from you, and then everything goes downhill in uni,, I can't help but being upset. They all expect a first from me and I probably will lie to them about it for the rest of my life... welp
Original post by Idklmaoo
Thank you I really needed this🥲 I know realistically a 2.2 is not a bad grade! and that I am likely overreacting... but when you grow up with good grades, with a family that expects it from you, and then everything goes downhill in uni,, I can't help but being upset. They all expect a first from me and I probably will lie to them about it for the rest of my life... welp

Don't be embarrassed about it. Every year people get 2.2s and thirds and only 20%-30% of graduates end up with firsts. Your parents should know better and understand that life does not always go the way you want it to. Also, you don't need a first to get a graduate job. In my previous post, I explained why this is the case. From my experience, most employers only use your grade for initial screening. I haven't seen a single graduate job that asks candidates to have a first class degree and the reason for this is because employers understand that not everyone will be getting firsts and also because your degree classification doesn't define you and don't show all the other skills that are important for the job.

Also, if you want to do a masters then you can also do that. I have seen plenty of universities that accept students with 2.2s and some others accept 2.1s, but will still consider you if you had mitigating circumstances or have relevant work experience. However, I would advise against this. I wouldn't recommend you studying a masters just to cover up your bachelors grade. Firstly, it's not worth the money and secondly there is no guarantee that you'll do much better in your masters and don't experience the same problems again. Thirdly, employers don't give a damn about your masters. They just want to know what you have done and what you can do. If you want to do a masters then think about whether it's worth it or not in your case.
Original post by Idklmaoo
Thank you and I hope things get better for your partner too🥲

Your most welcome my pms are open if you need any help my friend and at the end of the day what matters most is you gave it your all, so you cannot be further prouder than that :smile:. Thank you so much 🥺❤️.
Original post by Idklmaoo
What do you mean bsc or honours? I didn't even know there were different levels of bsc ? But honestly if you are not feeling mentally good I think dropping out or just deferring is the best. I regret not deferring in my 2nd year.


At Scottish universities, there's a Bachelor's degree without honours and there's one with honours. There's 4 years to a degree and if you complete your third year you get a degree without honours but if you complete fourth year, you get one with honours (so like the degree classification 2:2). For just passing third year, you get a Pass for a BSc. I've withdrawn but left it open for completion in another time.

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