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    Hi all! I have the following query. I have been admitted to Warwick Business School (MSc of Finance and Economics) and LSE (MSc of Regulation and Managment of Risk). The programme at WBS really appleals greatly to me because it is research orientated. The programme at LSE was actually my second choice, I was rejected for my first choice that was Master of Finance and Economics. However, I have taken 3 levels of CFA and I believe I have some theoretical background in pure Finance. So, I am really wondering whether LSE's brand really worths considering going to LSE rather than WBS. However, I got a partial scholarship from Warwick that covers almost 50% of my tuition fee, which is very importnat for me as I don't have resources to fund my studies unless I get a bank loan.

    So, what do you think? Do you believe tha I should pursue with Risk Management programme in LSE because of greater employability prospects? Thank you for opinions!
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    (Original post by tzfadi)
    Hi all! I have the following query. I have been admitted to Warwick Business School (MSc of Finance and Economics) and LSE (MSc of Regulation and Managment of Risk). The programme at WBS really appleals greatly to me because it is research orientated. The programme at LSE was actually my second choice, I was rejected for my first choice that was Master of Finance and Economics. However, I have taken 3 levels of CFA and I believe I have some theoretical background in pure Finance. So, I am really wondering whether LSE's brand really worths considering going to LSE rather than WBS. However, I got a partial scholarship from Warwick that covers almost 50% of my tuition fee, which is very importnat for me as I don't have resources to fund my studies unless I get a bank loan.

    So, what do you think? Do you believe tha I should pursue with Risk Management programme in LSE because of greater employability prospects? Thank you for opinions!
    Firstly, what exactly is your theoretical background in pure Finance, and what is your work experience. I presume given the fact that you have done all three levels of CFA that you have some professional experience? Secondly, and more importantly, what exactly do you want to do after the course. If you want to be a trader/salesperson/buyside analyst/pm etc then you are better off going for the brand of LSE and the much more applied courses on the risk management programme. If however you want to continue to do a PHD then the LSE risk management course is a very expensive and I would pretty inefficient way of going about it, since the Warwick MSc Finance and Eco which is a very very hardcore degree (at LSE or Warwick) will prepare you perfectly for a PHD programme (or a job as a quant). If you did Risk Management at LSE then decided you wanted to do a PHD they would actually make you do the Finance and Eco programme (research) for a whole year before you could get admitted onto the PHD (assuming you havent already done the necessary degree to enter a PHD already, in which case the question would then be why dont you go straight to a PHD!) Hope that helps
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    Thank you for your valuable insight! It really helps.. but when you say the WBS MSc program is very hardcore, does it mean that it has less prospects for employment compared to LSE program? Do employers recognize it as prestigious and challenging, but not that practical? Well, I would like to pursue a career as a research analyst, more analytical position rather than a trader or a salesperson. But I do not intend to do a PhD afterwards. I have professional experience as a research economist at an economic think-tank but I definitely want to move to the private sector, and not stay in the NGO sector.
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    (Original post by tzfadi)
    Thank you for your valuable insight! It really helps.. but when you say the WBS MSc program is very hardcore, does it mean that it has less prospects for employment compared to LSE program? Do employers recognize it as prestigious and challenging, but not that practical? Well, I would like to pursue a career as a research analyst, more analytical position rather than a trader or a salesperson. But I do not intend to do a PhD afterwards. I have professional experience as a research economist at an economic think-tank but I definitely want to move to the private sector, and not stay in the NGO sector.
    Very hardcore means very mathematical and very abstract. You spend your whole year working not in the real world but in an imaginary world called Q (pricing world) where you spend a lot of time just solving PDEs etc. Hence why risk management would be more useful if you wanted an applied course to take you into an Investment Bank. If you do want to be a research economist then Finance and Eco is probably perfect for you then. In that case you have a dilemma, because I can honestly tell you than most employers will not appreciate at all the level of difficulty of a Finance and Eco course and the relative difference between that and a risk management course. As shallow as it sounds, most employers (from experience I would say 95% of people in investment banks) would just look and see "oh you have a degree from the LSE, or from Warwick etc". So brand counts more in that respect for prestige, although as I said the Warwick course is much better for your technical skills (which may prove useful in an interview). So you have to make a choice between CV prestige and actual technical strength of degree. Whichever one you choose you will be at a good uni (which Warwick definitely is) and you will learn a lot, so its a nice position to be in. Dont forget theres a huge cost difference between living in the heart of London and living in the heart of Coventry.
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    Thank you a lot. That certainly will help me deciding. Anyway, i will have really a tough choice to make only if I get a scholarship from LSE, otherwise I will most certainly go to WBS.
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    (Original post by gradstudent1983)
    In that case you have a dilemma, because I can honestly tell you than most employers will not appreciate at all the level of difficulty of a Finance and Eco course and the relative difference between that and a risk management course. As shallow as it sounds, most employers (from experience I would say 95% of people in investment banks) would just look and see "oh you have a degree from the LSE, or from Warwick etc". So brand counts more in that respect for prestige, although as I said the Warwick course is much better for your technical skills (which may prove useful in an interview). So you have to make a choice between CV prestige and actual technical strength of degree.
    emphasis mine

    Gradstudent1983,

    Interesting quote there. While I've heard that the LSE on your resume counts more than the particular M.Sc. program one studied, I was curious if your quote above regarding employers is, in your opinion, specific to Finance/Risk Management students or to LSE postgraduate students in general. I currently have an offer for Sociology but am interested in jobs in international business, consulting, etc. I'm considering reapplying for Global Politics or International Political Economy next year since I'm slightly more interested in those topics and have a small feeling that business employers may find those programs more attractive in applicants. I was curious if you thought Global Politics or International Political Economy would be more attractive for employers or if there wouldn't really be any difference, employment wise, between Sociology and Global Politics/IPE as long as one had the LSE on your resume.
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    (Original post by Daretel)
    emphasis mine

    Gradstudent1983,

    Interesting quote there. While I've heard that the LSE on your resume counts more than the particular M.Sc. program one studied, I was curious if your quote above regarding employers is, in your opinion, specific to Finance/Risk Management students or to LSE postgraduate students in general. I currently have an offer for Sociology but am interested in jobs in international business, consulting, etc. I'm considering reapplying for Global Politics or International Political Economy next year since I'm slightly more interested in those topics and have a small feeling that business employers may find those programs more attractive in applicants. I was curious if you thought Global Politics or International Political Economy would be more attractive for employers or if there wouldn't really be any difference, employment wise, between Sociology and Global Politics/IPE as long as one had the LSE on your resume.
    Hi - firstly I must emphasise that my experience is related very specifically to Investment Banks, I have no direct experience with Management Consultancies etc although if Im giving you my view I cant see why a Consultancy would have any more intricate knowledge about the relative merits of degree x vs degree y at the LSE. To answer your question, within the realms of Investment Banking, my comment does refer loosely to the general economics/finance/business area of degree, where there would not be any difference. (in most cases, obviously a quant has some idea of the relative technical strength of a degree but thats only because that is the prerequisite for being a quant whereas most jobs even trading/sales/research etc you can learn on the job with basic university level mats) As regards to sociology, if Im honest with you the probability of you getting to the interview stage at an Investment bank with sociology is less than global politics or political economy. But as I said, this is the case for Investment Banks and I cannot comment on consultancies and would not be in a position to guess about their hiring policies. Im not sure it would be a million miles away though?
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    erm..
    im interested in applying to LSE's MSc social research methods , ive finished a BA in Economics and a PG Diploma in international business. I was unable to apply as yet. the programme availability page still claims the course is "Open". :eek:
    im an international student and my documents may take a while to get there.
    Any thoughts on whether i should go ahead and apply? or wait it out till next year/ apply to different universities that may have other courses im interested in?
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    (Original post by lastminuteroadrunner)
    erm..
    im interested in applying to LSE's MSc social research methods , ive finished a BA in Economics and a PG Diploma in international business. I was unable to apply as yet. the programme availability page still claims the course is "Open". :eek:
    im an international student and my documents may take a while to get there.
    Any thoughts on whether i should go ahead and apply? or wait it out till next year/ apply to different universities that may have other courses im interested in?
    You may want to email the dept to make sure they're still accepting. It may be that they havent got round to updating their status, in which case you would be wasting your time.
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    Got an offer for MSc Population and Development. Apparently the accommodation deadline has passed but as I shall be getting my results next week, I will only apply after then.

    What halls are you guys thinking of? I swear the accom is well-expensive but i guess that is what you have to expect when living in central london!
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    GOD DAMN IT.....I finally got average 68.75,,,,,However i need 70 to get in....Am i still hopeful to get in??? If not , I'll not send my result to LSE for reviewing...Much appreciated
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    (Original post by casoncheng)
    GOD DAMN IT.....I finally got average 68.75,,,,,However i need 70 to get in....Am i still hopeful to get in??? If not , I'll not send my result to LSE for reviewing...Much appreciated
    Are you sure you need 70? Was that their condition or was their condition a 1st? 68.75 can be considered a first in some universities if you have the right amount of 1st credits, check with your uni to make sure.
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    THX for your reply. This is my condition: 'You are required to obtain your Bachelor's degree with first class honours. If you do not achieve first class honours, please send us your full results to review. We will then consider your case and make a final decision.'


    Unfortunately I don't get enough credits to get to the 1st......Am i still hopeful? What can I do apart from sending official result to LSE?

    much appreciated
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    Send them a transcript with a letter stating that your university usually pushes borderline cases such as 68-69 upto a 1st but you failed to get enough credits to get the 1st. Should be ok hopefully. Do it asap because it's better you do it now while people have still not confirmed their places / no offers have been given than july/august where people will start confirming their places.
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    many thx,,,It usually takes the university 3 weeks for preparing the official transcript.....Damn it..!!!!!! Even if I request my transcript right now, I don't think I could receive my transcript before august...
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    I wouldn't state "university usually pushed yadda yadda yadda.." crap, just state you narrowly missed the offer and put forward a few reasons why you would do well on said course.. Did you do particularly well on any relevant modules for example? State the positives, not the excuses.
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    Yes,, usually I'm good at the quantative modules. But this year I only get 70 which can't reflect my true level.. This is the reason why I missed the 1st....Shall I state that?? Or shall I say nothing, and only send my results to LSE and state I'm an oversea student.. Coz lot's of my friends told me it is definitely OK if u are 1 or 2 marks less.
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    Sorry people, I am back here again.
    In the end, LSE didn't process my 2nd choice MSc Economics at all, my first choice MSc Finance and Economics gave me a big fat rejection, 2 weeks after the 2nd choice MSc Economics was closed. What a *******!
    Now I've got a first class honour, with 1 modules > 80 and 1 modules > 90, think I should send them the additional information to make them consider me for MSc Econ?
    Or should I just leave it?

    I am so sick of LSE toying me around like a little doll, but I kinda need to put my obsession with LSE at rest as well.

    Any suggestion will be grateful, even a straight `wake-up-that's-not-gonna-change-a- damn' help.
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    why don't you take a year our gaining some work experience. With a first-class honours from warwick, you will def get in to LSE next year, but hell, I'd aim for Oxbridge! I think you really have a good chance!
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    do you guys reckon that LSE consider a 2:2 after making an offer for a 2:1 intially for a course such as population and development?
 
 
 
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