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What is A-level philosophy like?

I'm really struggling to pick my alevel subjects, at my college there are 'pathways' with a certain number of subjects you can pick that all go well with each other and there are only 6 in the pathway that includes art, which i want to do. the other one i'd like is psychology, and lastly the only other ones that maaaybe i'd like are philosophy/religion studies and history. when i went to my college welcome day, history honestly seemed to have very boring topics in the spec so i kind of stopped thinking about it. the only other one i might like is philosophy. but what is it like? is it boring? and since it's 'philosophy and religion studies' is it mostly religion topics or philosophy? i've looked at samples of textbooks and i find the philosophical things like questions and theories super interesting and cool to think about, but does it get difficult or boring? and since art is apparently the most time consuming thing ever, is philosophy also hard to study for/time consuming?
Reply 1
It depends on your exam board, but for AQA, at least, there will be one paper for philosophy of religion and ethics, and another for the study of religion itself. These three themes will often cross over. Ask your future teacher(s) for details on what your exam board will be if you don't already know. When/if you do know, take a look at the specification on the website.

You may find it difficult at times, depending on your ability to apply theory to actual scenarios. You need evaluative and critical skills to do well in the subject.

For AQA component 1, this is what will be assessed:

Section A: Philosophy of religion
Arguments for the existence of God
Evil and suffering
Religious experience
Religious language
Miracles
Self and life after death.
Section B: Ethics and religion
Ethical theories
Issues of human life and death
Issues of animal life and death
Introduction to meta ethics
Free will and moral responsibility
Conscience
Bentham and Kant.


AQA component 2:
Section A: Study of religion for each faith option (2A–2E) the following topics are covered:
Sources of wisdom and authority
God/gods/ultimate reality
Self, death and the afterlife
Good conduct and key moral principles
Expression of religious identity
Religion, gender and sexuality
Religion and science
Religion and secularisation
Religion and religious pluralism.

Section B: The dialogue between philosophy of religion and religion.
How religion is influenced by, and has an influence on philosophy of religion in relation to the issues studied.

Section C: The dialogue between ethical studies and religion.
How religion is influenced by, and has an influence on ethical studies in relation to the issues studied.

Studying for this subject definitely takes time, but if you make consistent bursts of effort throughout the year, you should cope just fine. I made a lot of flashcards and wrote many practice essays for my teachers to mark during the two academic years. This helped a lot.

There are quite a few people who will tell you that philosophy/religious studies is pointless and will not benefit you in the future, which couldn't be further from the truth. I was really interested in everything that was being taught and loved every lesson. Any critical thinking skills you had prior will be further developed. Your writing will be more structured and your expression of ideas will be more coherent. I personally loved learning about applied ethics (very relevant, especially today, with abortion and euthanasia laws, animal rights, etc.) as well as free will and moral responsibility.

I'd recommend watching some videos on these topics by Crash Course Philosophy on YouTube.

If these sorts of issues already intrigue you, I'd recommend it.
Original post by Meduse
It depends on your exam board, but for AQA, at least, there will be one paper for philosophy of religion and ethics, and another for the study of religion itself. These three themes will often cross over. Ask your future teacher(s) for details on what your exam board will be if you don't already know. When/if you do know, take a look at the specification on the website.

You may find it difficult at times, depending on your ability to apply theory to actual scenarios. You need evaluative and critical skills to do well in the subject.

For AQA component 1, this is what will be assessed:

Section A: Philosophy of religion
Arguments for the existence of God
Evil and suffering
Religious experience
Religious language
Miracles
Self and life after death.
Section B: Ethics and religion
Ethical theories
Issues of human life and death
Issues of animal life and death
Introduction to meta ethics
Free will and moral responsibility
Conscience
Bentham and Kant.


AQA component 2:
Section A: Study of religion for each faith option (2A–2E) the following topics are covered:
Sources of wisdom and authority
God/gods/ultimate reality
Self, death and the afterlife
Good conduct and key moral principles
Expression of religious identity
Religion, gender and sexuality
Religion and science
Religion and secularisation
Religion and religious pluralism.

Section B: The dialogue between philosophy of religion and religion.
How religion is influenced by, and has an influence on philosophy of religion in relation to the issues studied.

Section C: The dialogue between ethical studies and religion.
How religion is influenced by, and has an influence on ethical studies in relation to the issues studied.

Studying for this subject definitely takes time, but if you make consistent bursts of effort throughout the year, you should cope just fine. I made a lot of flashcards and wrote many practice essays for my teachers to mark during the two academic years. This helped a lot.

There are quite a few people who will tell you that philosophy/religious studies is pointless and will not benefit you in the future, which couldn't be further from the truth. I was really interested in everything that was being taught and loved every lesson. Any critical thinking skills you had prior will be further developed. Your writing will be more structured and your expression of ideas will be more coherent. I personally loved learning about applied ethics (very relevant, especially today, with abortion and euthanasia laws, animal rights, etc.) as well as free will and moral responsibility.

I'd recommend watching some videos on these topics by Crash Course Philosophy on YouTube.

If these sorts of issues already intrigue you, I'd recommend it.

I know this is random but would it be possible to cover this course in 4 months. Im very interested in philosophy and this subject intrigues me.
I want to do the exams this summer.
is it religious studies or philosophy
do what you think is best for u, my sister does philosophy and she finds it so difficult but enjoys her other subjects like english lit and psychology
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 4
Original post by ProcrastinatorMo
I know this is random but would it be possible to cover this course in 4 months. Im very interested in philosophy and this subject intrigues me.
I want to do the exams this summer.

Honestly, I think that'd be cutting it short.

It depends on if you'll be self-teaching, or not, your learning abilities, and the resources you have available to you.

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