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    (Original post by No Future)
    If they can't afford to buy normal sanitary products, how can they afford/have the facilities to clean a mooncup properly?

    (in any case mooncup = eeew)

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    I agree with whoever pointed out this is one of many problems of the third world...Surely lack of food, clean water and basic healthcare facilities/drugs are even more pressing matters?

    don't sanitary towels count as that?
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    (Original post by anna_spanner89)
    don't sanitary towels count as that?
    I think he/she means vaccinations and drugs for life threatening diseases, rather than sanitary products.
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    (Original post by anna_spanner89)
    don't sanitary towels count as that?
    Yes, you're right. I would agree they are basic healthcare products.

    However, many do not live to start their periods. As smellslikemarmite points out, e.g. vaccines/drugs.
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    (Original post by No Future)

    I agree with whoever pointed out this is one of many problems of the third world...Surely lack of food, clean water and basic healthcare facilities/drugs are even more pressing matters? Childhood disease and high infant mortality rates would surely kill many before girls even reached the age to menstruate.
    So because we can't help everything, we should help nothing?
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    (Original post by Syntax Terrier)
    In those sorts of places they seem to be preggers or don't have enough body fat to mensturate most of the time.
    :rolleyes:

    this is known as Kwashiorkor, where they are very malnourished and close to death
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    (Original post by tetrahydrocannabinol.)
    So because we can't help everything, we should help nothing?
    No, not at all. I didn't comment on whether we should or should not help. I pointed out that yes this issue of sanitary products is a problem, but there are also other issues that perhaps need addressing to a greater extent. It is possible to want to help with more than one issue.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Yes, you're right. I would agree they are basic healthcare products.

    However, many do not live to start their periods. As smellslikemarmite points out, e.g. vaccines/drugs.

    well how about those who do carry on to live, the women who want to start families yet can't due to infertility because of lack of sanitary products, or those teenage girls wanting to go to school and gain an education yet they smell and are dirty because lack of sanitary products those women wanting to work to earn a living

    you'd be surprised how one little tampon or towel can make a difference to a womans life..try going without one during your next period lol

    In all seriousness, yes we are doing all we can to help, this is a relatively unknown issue and i was bringing it to light.

    Personally during my Gap year, for world womens day in march i'm going to do a fundraising event for this campaign.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    No, not at all. I didn't comment on whether we should or should not help. I pointed out that yes this issue of sanitary products is a problem, but there are also other issues that perhaps need addressing to a greater extent. It is possible to want to help with more than one issue.
    But those issues are the common issues everyone always mentions, and for which there are numerous charities set up for (not that that's ever a bad thing, the more the merrier) and this is a less-known problem which needs the spotlight on it, not to be removed the second it finally comes to light.
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    It's obviously a really important issue, because it's important that young girls can attend school and get an education, but surely it's not sustainable in the long run. They can't reply on disposable products forever. Surely setting them up with clean water is far more sustainable?
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    (Original post by Ramble)
    I've been waiting for 18 years and I still haven't had one. Do you think I should see my doctor?
    as long as you truely do have testicles, i think you'll be alright :p:
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    (Original post by tetrahydrocannabinol.)
    But those issues are the common issues everyone always mentions, and for which there are numerous charities set up for (not that that's ever a bad thing, the more the merrier) and this is a less-known problem which needs the spotlight on it, not to be removed the second it finally comes to light.
    Absoloutely- has anyone had a 'surprise' period, and just felt disgusting as its all over the knickers etc, imagine that for your whole period
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    Sorry to bump this old thread (although I think it is a cause worth bumping), but to the person who sent me a message via a rep: you need to click on my name and send me a private message because i can't see who you are to reply!
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    As I said before I don't think this is a huge deal in comparison to charities for famine and disease.
    In 3rd world countries women just use old world ways to sort out their time of the month, as people here did up until a century or two ago. Just rags and lots of em.
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    (Original post by bexicle89)
    As I said before I don't think this is a huge deal in comparison to charities for famine and disease.
    In 3rd world countries women just use old world ways to sort out their time of the month, as people here did up until a century or two ago. Just rags and lots of em.
    I think the main issue is that it's interfering with their education.
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    (Original post by nolongerhearthemusic)
    I think the main issue is that it's interfering with their education.
    So what did women in the western world do during the education reforms and servant girls who had to work for familes do before there was always and tampax? They used rags that they used to wash out and re-use.
    So do Amish women too, and they just get on with their lives.
    Just my personal opinion but I think this is much ado about nothing when there are much more serious problems out there.
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    (Original post by bexicle89)
    So what did women in the western world do during the education reforms and servant girls who had to work for familes do before there was always and tampax? They used rags that they used to wash out and re-use.
    So do Amish women too, and they just get on with their lives.
    Just my personal opinion but I think this is much ado about nothing when there are much more serious problems out there.
    I agree, I think they should use something reusable. Sending them disposable products would create more problems than it solves. But the point is, they don't always have enough clean water to clean them properly.

    There are more important issues, but that doesn't mean we should ignore this one.
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    (Original post by devilgirl999)
    why cant they be all put on the pill permanently - stops periods and prevents pregnancy
    I always wondered if the pill stopped them completely. Didn't know much about the pill.
    I won't be taking it anyway so don't really need to know, don't agree with it really.
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    (Original post by Blue Rose)
    I always wondered if the pill stopped them completely. Didn't know much about the pill.
    I won't be taking it anyway so don't really need to know, don't agree with it really.
    You don't agree with the pill?
 
 
 
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