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hi,
if i apply for masters right away at a uni, is it the exact same content as the bachelors without the 4th year ?
thank you
Original post by hannahco
hi,
if i apply for masters right away at a uni, is it the exact same content as the bachelors without the 4th year ?
thank you


Yes, I believe on pretty much every course the Bachelor's and Master's degrees are the same, but the Master's has an additional fourth year tagged on to the end of it that involves a research project (kinda like a mini PhD). Master's courses usually have higher entry requirements for this reason however, so if you're worried about this, simply apply for the Bachelor's and transition to the Master's during your degree. This is completely normal and allowed (if you're doing well enough on your degree), and tons of people do it at every uni and on every course. You can also do the opposite and switch from Master's to Bachelor's partway through if you change your mind about a four year course, and you can even change your degree subject entirely (within reason) whilst at uni, if you don't like the one you're doing.
If you're planning to go on to do a PhD in the future, I recommend skipping the Master's and going straight onto that instead after your Bachelor's is complete. Otherwise you're just wasting another year of your life and getting into further debt for a qualification that nobody cares about in comparison with a PhD.
Hope this helps. :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by BlueBazooka
Yes, I believe on pretty much every course the Bachelor's and Master's degrees are the same, but the Master's has an additional fourth year tagged on to the end of it that involves a research project (kinda like a mini PhD). Master's courses usually have higher entry requirements for this reason however, so if you're worried about this, simply apply for the Bachelor's and transition to the Master's during your degree. This is completely normal and allowed (if you're doing well enough on your degree), and tons of people do it at every uni and on every course. You can also do the opposite and switch from Master's to Bachelor's partway through if you change your mind about a four year course, and you can even change your degree subject entirely (within reason) whilst at uni, if you don't like the one you're doing.
If you're planning to go on to do a PhD in the future, I recommend skipping the Master's and going straight onto that instead after your Bachelor's is complete. Otherwise you're just wasting another year of your life and getting into further debt for a qualification that nobody cares about in comparison with a PhD.
Hope this helps. :smile:


thank you :smile: i didnt know you could go straight onto the phd rather than masters degree, thanks for letting me know. i start uni in september and have already been accepted onto the masters ! do you know the length and cost of doing a phd ? and how come lots of people do masters degrees before their phd when they can skip it ?
and do you know if after first year of uni, can you switch unis ? or after getting your bachelors degree, can you do your masters or phd at another uni ? and if you can, how would you do this / what are the usual requirements ?
sorry for all the questions haha

thank you :smile:
Sorry, do you mean a masters before an undergrad?
Not in any uni I have been aware of?
An integrated masters, yes. Sometimes the third year is slightly different (three year students may do a shorter dissertation at the end of it which four year students don't). You'll need to check the exact details for the universities you are interested in.
As above assuming this is an integrated masters, normally the first two years are identical, but you may need to achieve a higher average to stay on the 4 year course (if you fall below that you may be moved to the 3 year course) - usually you need to average 55% or above, compared to the minimum pass of 40% (and compared to the minimum required for a 2:1, which is 60% - so most would be aiming to get above this anyway).

The third year as above can have some differences. Projects/theses/dissertations may be required for 3 year course students but not 4 year course students, and those on the 4 year course who are required to do something in that vein may have a different or shorter version. They may also be marked differently in theirs.
Original post by hannahco
thank you :smile: i didnt know you could go straight onto the phd rather than masters degree, thanks for letting me know. i start uni in september and have already been accepted onto the masters ! do you know the length and cost of doing a phd ? and how come lots of people do masters degrees before their phd when they can skip it ?
and do you know if after first year of uni, can you switch unis ? or after getting your bachelors degree, can you do your masters or phd at another uni ? and if you can, how would you do this / what are the usual requirements ?
sorry for all the questions haha

thank you :smile:


Oh well done! Which uni and course have you been accepted onto? I was just accepted to study Physics at Durham University and I'm very excited for it!

To answer your questions:
Phd's usually take quite a while to achieve (at least four years usually), but their length can be decreased by doing a Master's. Overall, it comes out to about the same length of time spent at uni, but people often do a Master's because they're unsure of whether or not they want to do a PhD. However, if you're confident that you'd like to do one, especially if they're what you need to really advance in the career you want to pursue, you might as well go straight on to a PhD. This is because you can ask your uni to fund your PhD for you, meaning they'll pay you to do it, instead of paying them a tuition fee as you would for a Master's. The funding is usually only the salary of a part time job or a full time on at minimum wage, but it's a lot better to earn money than get into further debt lmao. I hear a lot of PhD students often ask their uni for additional funding to do some research, complete the research using less than half the funding given, and then pocket the rest! A good method if you're short on cash.

You can always switch unis at any time, though you'd have to apply by yourself through UCAS again. The common thing is to move to a different uni for your Master's or PhD yes, often a better one than the one you did your Bachelor's degree at. I'm not sure of the full requirements for that sort of thing, but I imagine it's a lot easier to get accepted into a decent uni once you already have a degree under your belt.
Reply 7
Can I ask how the whole degree thing works? Is there an end exam each year? Is it just pass or fail? What happens if you fail?
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by KP2004
Can I ask how the whole degree thing works? Is there an end exam each year? Is it just pass or fail? What happens if you fail?


There are usually termly exams and end of year exams like school. Usually each exam will comprise of a percentage of your total degree, so if you fail, you won't necessarily fail your entire degree, but you'll have to do better on future exams to make up for it. Of course, an exam that's worth a larger proportion of your degree course is more crucial to do well at.
At the end of your course, depending on how well you've done throughout it, you'll receive basically what you can consider a grade. From best to worst, this goes: 1st, 2:1, 2:2, Third, Ordinary Degree, Fail. A better 'grade' will open up more career opportunities to you in the future.
Original post by KP2004
Can I ask how the whole degree thing works? Is there an end exam each year? Is it just pass or fail? What happens if you fail?


Varies wildly between unis. There really is no one answer to this, you need to look at every course separately to see how they are assessed (and individual modules/papers may be assessed differently within the same uni).

It's not pass or fail though usually, unless you only end up with an ordinary degree somehow (i.e. you fail to get an honours degree - typically failing the dissertation leads to this). Although a few degrees are ordinary degrees by default, e.g. medical degrees without an intercalated year are normally ordinary degrees that are pass/fail with no classification (instead things get sorted into deciles to rank all the students against each other!).

For a regular honours degree, you get a classification, which falls into one of several categories: 1st class, second class which is divided into upper second class (2:1) and lower second class (2:2) or third class. Anything below third class is a fail. Usually the classifications are such that 70% or above is a 1st, 60-69~% is a 2:1, 50-59~% a 2:2, 40-49~% a 3rd, and below 40% a fail (some unis have different schemes overall, like the OU, or slightly different processes which scale marks for particular subjects, like languages at SOAS which are marked out of 80 only). The exact cut off point varies between unis, it can be from 70% and above only for a 1st, or a rounded up 69.5%, or 69% etc.

Generally students aim for a 2:1 or above, as this is the "standard" for grad roles and grad schemes. A 1st might be desirable for some, and would be often very desirable (or sometimes practically necessary) to continue to a funded PhD.

Spoiler

(edited 1 year ago)

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