The Student Room Group

GCSE Spanish help

I'm going into Year 11 in September and I'm predicted all 8s and 9s except for a 6 in Spanish. How do I bring this up to a 9? I'm doing Edexcel Spanish but I presume it's mostly the same for every exam board.
Original post by jules14916
I'm going into Year 11 in September and I'm predicted all 8s and 9s except for a 6 in Spanish. How do I bring this up to a 9? I'm doing Edexcel Spanish but I presume it's mostly the same for every exam board.

Hi there

@Meduse or could help. :smile:

Best wishes. :smile:
Reply 2
Thank you x
Original post by TriplexA
Hi there

@Meduse or could help. :smile:

Best wishes. :smile:
Reply 3
Original post by jules14916
I'm going into Year 11 in September and I'm predicted all 8s and 9s except for a 6 in Spanish. How do I bring this up to a 9? I'm doing Edexcel Spanish but I presume it's mostly the same for every exam board.

So, this really depends on what you're struggling with most and where you're losing marks.

Could you provide any feedback you have received from your teacher(s)? Are there any specific areas you need to work on?

Here's some general advice:

- Get to grips with the grammar. Use a GCSE textbook (try and find one for your specific exam board). Use Quizlet or regular flashcards and write down the conjugations for each tense depending on the subject.
- Don't forget your subject/noun agreements, always check these once you've answered every question in the exam paper. Have a critical eye and treat it as a grammar test.
- Learn your vocab. Your teacher should provide vocabulary lists. Make flashcards for these, or even a mindmap depending on the topic, and revisit it regularly. Test yourself. Get your family/friends to test you, if possible. If you see a word that keeps cropping up in past papers and you don't know what it means, find out and jot it down!
- For speaking, I'd advise rehearsing things out loud. You should have (or will have) the opportunity to write lots of answers to themed questions in year 11. Become familiar with forming complex sentence structures using a more subject-specific, broader range of vocabulary that isn't included in the standard lists provided.
- To improve your accent and intonation, listen to some beginners' Spanish podcasts or watch Spanish news video clips online. There are plenty on YouTube. You can also listen to some Spanish music and try imitating their accent as closely as possible. The more familiar and exposed to the accent, the easier it will be to imitate it.
- Don't rush your answers in the speaking exam. It's fine to take the time to think about your answer, just try using a filler word to avoid any dead silences, such as: pues (meaning 'well...', a ver ('let's see...).
- Listening to podcasts and trying to understand what they are discussing is a great way of preparing for the listening exam. You need to be doing this regularly. I used to play a podcast and write down the key points being discussed.
- In the listening exam, discard any of the irrelevant information. They've thrown that in there to try and trip you up. Read the question carefully, and use that to find your answer. Watch out for any negative/trick statements. If someone mentions 'a la biblioteca', you may assume they definitely went there. Little do you know, they may have actually stated they like going to the library, but they prefer visiting the museum. So be careful here.
- Subjunctive and idiomatic phrases can boost your speaking and writing marks, so create a list, and use them where appropriate! There are plenty of websites that list good examples. Always check them with your teacher to ensure they make sense, as the internet can't always be trusted.
- Tackle the translation questions methodically. Really think about the word order, the structure, and how correct it sounds in the target language, For Spanish to English translations, use your native language to your advantage. Keep checking over the entire thing. You should be able to easily identify what reads properly, and what sounds strange.
- Do one past paper before each mock, but ensure you leave some left for when your exams are approaching. You don't want to run out!

I hope this was helpful.

¡Buena suerte!
Reply 4
Original post by Meduse
So, this really depends on what you're struggling with most and where you're losing marks.

Could you provide any feedback you have received from your teacher(s)? Are there any specific areas you need to work on?

Here's some general advice:

- Get to grips with the grammar. Use a GCSE textbook (try and find one for your specific exam board). Use Quizlet or regular flashcards and write down the conjugations for each tense depending on the subject.
- Don't forget your subject/noun agreements, always check these once you've answered every question in the exam paper. Have a critical eye and treat it as a grammar test.
- Learn your vocab. Your teacher should provide vocabulary lists. Make flashcards for these, or even a mindmap depending on the topic, and revisit it regularly. Test yourself. Get your family/friends to test you, if possible. If you see a word that keeps cropping up in past papers and you don't know what it means, find out and jot it down!
- For speaking, I'd advise rehearsing things out loud. You should have (or will have) the opportunity to write lots of answers to themed questions in year 11. Become familiar with forming complex sentence structures using a more subject-specific, broader range of vocabulary that isn't included in the standard lists provided.
- To improve your accent and intonation, listen to some beginners' Spanish podcasts or watch Spanish news video clips online. There are plenty on YouTube. You can also listen to some Spanish music and try imitating their accent as closely as possible. The more familiar and exposed to the accent, the easier it will be to imitate it.
- Don't rush your answers in the speaking exam. It's fine to take the time to think about your answer, just try using a filler word to avoid any dead silences, such as: pues (meaning 'well...', a ver ('let's see...).
- Listening to podcasts and trying to understand what they are discussing is a great way of preparing for the listening exam. You need to be doing this regularly. I used to play a podcast and write down the key points being discussed.
- In the listening exam, discard any of the irrelevant information. They've thrown that in there to try and trip you up. Read the question carefully, and use that to find your answer. Watch out for any negative/trick statements. If someone mentions 'a la biblioteca', you may assume they definitely went there. Little do you know, they may have actually stated they like going to the library, but they prefer visiting the museum. So be careful here.
- Subjunctive and idiomatic phrases can boost your speaking and writing marks, so create a list, and use them where appropriate! There are plenty of websites that list good examples. Always check them with your teacher to ensure they make sense, as the internet can't always be trusted.
- Tackle the translation questions methodically. Really think about the word order, the structure, and how correct it sounds in the target language, For Spanish to English translations, use your native language to your advantage. Keep checking over the entire thing. You should be able to easily identify what reads properly, and what sounds strange.
- Do one past paper before each mock, but ensure you leave some left for when your exams are approaching. You don't want to run out!

I hope this was helpful.

¡Buena suerte!


Thank you my love! I really appreciate it! x

Quick Reply

Latest