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Are teachers allowed to push religious ideas on pupils? Watch

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    Ok, saying they are being pushed on pupils is a strong way of putting it, but my school is making me absolutely livid.

    For instance, in our rememberance service yesterday, the first line of our headmasters address was "We are gathered here in the presence of god to pray for his forgiveness, and for the memory of those killed.. blah blah.. repentance this and that.. readings from the bible.. lords prayer.. hymns.."

    My favourite line was "We ask you [god] to guide world leaders and statesmen in their decisions.." :eek:

    I felt like standing up, throwing something at our bloody headmaster and letting him know that I WASNT THERE TO PRAY FOR ANY FRIGGING GODS FORGIVENESS, I WAS THERE TO PAY MY RESPECTS FOR THOSE WHO DIED FOR THIS COUNTRY :mad:

    </ caps lock off>

    It's not a Christian school, or an independent, just a state school, and we get their religious lectures twice a week. When I asked if I could miss these assemblys so I would not have to hear this religious rubbish (im an atheist myself), I was told I have to attend as the purpose is not religious at all, but to celebrate and spread a sense of community.

    Can I object?
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    Your idea of religious ideas being pushed onto people is pretty tame compared to my school

    That is a bit weird for there to be so much religion in an assembly at a supposedly secular school. Unfortunately, I don't think there's much you can do about it
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    that's not pushing beliefs onto people
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    Yes, but at the same time, your objections are coming from a bigotted outlook and therefore could be rejected.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Yes, but at the same time, your objections are coming from a bigotted outlook and therefore could be rejected.
    Bigotted outlook? I don't see where that plays a part. I do not object to any religion, or religious service, I just object to being forced to playing a part in it. The bible is preached at me like it is a science textbook which cannot be questioned, and not singing along with hymns is punishable. Is that fair on atheists?
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    (Original post by iheartbugmenot23)
    so I would not have to hear this religious rubbish
    By calling it rubbish, you show your bigotted viewpoint. Sadly, that does play a role in it. If people feel you're just against it because you view it as twaddle or whatever, they will be more likely to ignore your request. If your school is preaching the bible at you in science, as you seem to be suggesting, I would complain to the authorities, such as the local education authority or council, not your school, and I would also mention the hymn bit, if it proves to be true.

    However, given your comments already, I am doubtful as to how much of what you say is true and not just hyperbole.
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    There is no separation of Church and State in England, so I'm afraid that institutionalisation of religion in state schools is completely legal. And Hylean, recognising nonsense is not bigotry, nor is opposing institutionalisation of specific unproved proposing viewpoint.
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    (Original post by arisk01)
    that's not pushing beliefs onto people
    No it isn't. It's no worse than teachers swearing or doing/saying things that religious people wouldn't approve of. There's always another side to these arguments.
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    (Original post by iheartbugmenot23)
    Bigotted outlook? I don't see where that plays a part. I do not object to any religion, or religious service, I just object to being forced to playing a part in it. The bible is preached at me like it is a science textbook which cannot be questioned, and not singing along with hymns is punishable. Is that fair on atheists?
    You have to attend other things too, I'm sure, should you be allowed to object those too?

    lol @ science books not being questioned though :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by iheartbugmenot23)
    Bigotted outlook? I don't see where that plays a part. I do not object to any religion, or religious service, I just object to being forced to playing a part in it. The bible is preached at me like it is a science textbook which cannot be questioned, and not singing along with hymns is punishable. Is that fair on atheists?
    What happens if you don't sing?!
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    (Original post by MrPhil)
    No it isn't. It's no worse than teachers swearing or doing/saying things that religious people wouldn't approve of. There's always another side to these arguments.
    I'm sorry, but there is a big difference between leading a prayer in an assembly and doing nebulous things that some religions might not approve of. If the flip side of the coin was actively rejecting religion, then I'd agree that would be pushing a viewpoint and thus inappropriate, but it's not, and this quite clearly is pushing religion.
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    OP, they are NOT allowed to punish you for refusing to sing hymns in a state school if you are not a member of the religion or religions that the hymns are a part of, as doing so would be a violation of your Article 9 ECHR rights.
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    I used to have the same nonsense thrown at me in primary school. We just used to take the piss of it really, change the words to hymns, prayers, et cetera. I'd certainly complain nowadays, it didn't occur to me back then.
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    (Original post by ~style)
    You have to attend other things too, I'm sure, should you be allowed to object those too?
    Yes, I should. What were you thinking of in particular?

    Interestingly, I'm sure if we had a Muslim headmaster who read the Qu'ran in 'assembly', there would be Daily Mail-esque uproar. Just because The Church of England is seen as the major religion of this country does not mean that it's services should be forced upon people.
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)
    There is no separation of Church and State in England, so I'm afraid that institutionalisation of religion in state schools is completely legal. And Hylean, recognising nonsense is not bigotry, nor is opposing institutionalisation of specific unproved proposing viewpoint.
    Calling it nonsense is bigotry, since there is no conclusive proof that it is nonsense, no matter how much the proponents of science might wish otherwise. Science has yet to disprove the existence of a higher being, though it hasn't proven it either, so "nonsense", "rubbish", etc. are all highly prejudicial words. You would call me a bigot if I started calling the Theory of Evolution or the Big Bang Theory rubbish, despite the flaws in the former and the lack of any proof whatsoever for the latter.

    Athiests who steadfastly refuse to acknowledge that they do not know and have no way of disproving the existence of a higher being and attack, even passively as is this case, the beliefs of thiest are bigots and as bad as any religious fanatic who attacks non-believers.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Calling it nonsense is bigotry, since there is no conclusive proof that it is nonsense, no matter how much the proponents of science might wish otherwise. Science has yet to disprove the existence of a higher being, though it hasn't proven it either, so "nonsense", "rubbish", etc. are all highly prejudicial words. You would call me a bigot if I started calling the Theory of Evolution or the Big Bang Theory rubbish, despite the flaws in the former and the lack of any proof whatsoever for the latter.

    Athiests who steadfastly refuse to acknowledge that they do not know and have no way of disproving the existence of a higher being and attack, even passively as is this case, the beliefs of thiest are bigots and as bad as any religious fanatic who attacks non-believers.
    If I were to say that there was a teapot floating somewhere in space between the Earth and Mars which was too small for our most powerful telescopes to detect, you would be not a bigot for calling what I said nonsense.
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    No, it's not right to have such a strong religious approach in assemblies... are there a lot of you that feel like this? Or even if it's just you, maybe it would be a good idea to ask for a meeting in which talk to them about your concerns and see if they can lower the religious tone - try out of respect because not all the students are Christian, many are other faiths as well, including atheist. Also try explaining that it's innappropriate for school, especially a non-faith based one.
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    Oh, just shut up and put up. It's not hurting you in any way to sit there for a few minutes while they mention God. Atheists who make a fuss like you just give every other atheist a reputation as a troublemaker.
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    That isn't ideas being pushed on you, the headteacher is religious which is his choice, and he sees the world from that perspective. Not pushing the beliefs on you at all.
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    (Original post by Ed.)
    That isn't ideas being pushed on you, the headteacher is religious which is his choice, and he sees the world from that perspective. Not pushing the beliefs on you at all.
    I dare say punishing people for refusing to sing Christian hymns can reasonably be considered pushing religion.
 
 
 
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