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A level bio

In the cell mediated response, are the antigens destroyed by T helper cells that stimulate phagocytosis? Since antibodies aren't involved ?
Original post by idontlikeessays
In the cell mediated response, are the antigens destroyed by T helper cells that stimulate phagocytosis? Since antibodies aren't involved ?

T helper cells just exist to recognize the antigens and after this these cells they release messengers in order to signalize the T killer cells the location of a diseased cell and to destroy this one, The T killer cells causes the cell death (apoptosis), a lysosome engulfs that dead cell as next and a phagocyte "eat" it last but not least.
Original post by Kallisto
T helper cells just exist to recognize the antigens and after this these cells they release messengers in order to signalize the T killer cells the location of a diseased cell and to destroy this one, The T killer cells causes the cell death (apoptosis), a lysosome engulfs that dead cell as next and a phagocyte "eat" it last but not least.

Thanks, so what actually kills the pathogen in the cell mediated response ?
Original post by idontlikeessays
Thanks, so what actually kills the pathogen in the cell mediated response ?


In terms of the T-killer cells special proteins, the perforines, are released and cause the apoptosis of the diseased cells.
Original post by Kallisto
In terms of the T-killer cells special proteins, the perforines, are released and cause the apoptosis of the diseased cells.


Okay thanks but what about the actual pathogen that is infecting the diseased cells - how is that destroyed ?
Original post by idontlikeessays
Okay thanks but what about the actual pathogen that is infecting the diseased cells - how is that destroyed ?


As a rule when the T-killer cells are in action, the pathogens are viruses which implant their RNA in a cell to infect this one. With the implanted RNA new viruses can be created inside the cell in order to break out (lysis) when there is a great number of them. They in turn are able to infect another cells in the same way. To prevent this apoptosis is the real deal in that case before it gets worse. Perforin and Cytotoxin are released to initiate this process - all these steps are doing before enough viruses are created inside the diseased cell.

In apoptosis the diseased cell is shrinking, the organelles (as in the ribosomes, the mitochondria, golgi apparatus, etc.) are eungulfed by vesicles and the macrophages eating these remains of the cell with all the produced viruses in.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Kallisto
As a rule when the T-killer cells are in action, the pathogens are viruses which implant their RNA in a cell to infect this one. With the implanted RNA new viruses can be created inside the cell in order to break out (lysis) when there is a great number of them. They in turn are able to infect another cells in the same way. To prevent this apoptosis is the real deal in that case before it gets worse. Perforin and Cytotoxin are released to initiate this process - all these steps are doing before enough viruses are created inside the diseased cell.

In apoptosis the diseased cell is shrinking, the organelles (as in the ribosomes, the mitochondria, golgi apparatus, etc.) are eungulfed by vesicles and the macrophages eating these remains of the cell with all the produced viruses in.

okay thanks. what about if the pathogen isn't a virus e.g bacteria so doesn't implant its RNA
Original post by idontlikeessays
okay thanks. what about if the pathogen isn't a virus e.g bacteria so doesn't implant its RNA


After the T-killer cells had released their perforins to result in cell lysis of the infected host cell, the bacteria which were inside the cell are now exposed to the outside of the cell, meaning antibodies can opsonize the bacteria by binding to the complementary antigen, and to a macrophage, enhancing phagocytosis by White blood cells(macrophage), resulting in destruction of the bacteria through a lysosome inside the macrophage fusing with the phagosome which is just the bacteria surrounded by a vesicle.
Original post by Abraham_Otaku
After the T-killer cells had released their perforins to result in cell lysis of the infected host cell, the bacteria which were inside the cell are now exposed to the outside of the cell, meaning antibodies can opsonize the bacteria by binding to the complementary antigen, and to a macrophage, enhancing phagocytosis by White blood cells(macrophage), resulting in destruction of the bacteria through a lysosome inside the macrophage fusing with the phagosome which is just the bacteria surrounded by a vesicle.

okay thank youu. so cell mediated response does involve antibodies?
Original post by idontlikeessays
okay thank youu. so cell mediated response does involve antibodies?

Well, the cell mediated response ends when the infected host cell is destroyed.. and only after that antibodies are involved where they opsonize the pathogen.. so Its only after the cell mediated response where antibodies are involved

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