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A Level Coursework 2022

Hi there. I completed my A level History and my A level English Literature coursework got A* and an A. It was then sent off to be externally marked and I forgot about it as was revising for exams. I thought there may be some mention of it when I got my A level results but there was just an overall Grade. Does anyone know if it will be detailed on the actual Certificates when you get them? It was Pearson Edexcel GCE for both. Thanks.
Original post by Snowwh
Hi there. I completed my A level History and my A level English Literature coursework got A* and an A. It was then sent off to be externally marked and I forgot about it as was revising for exams. I thought there may be some mention of it when I got my A level results but there was just an overall Grade. Does anyone know if it will be detailed on the actual Certificates when you get them? It was Pearson Edexcel GCE for both. Thanks.

It sounds like you don't have the results slip (from Edexcel themselves) and instead have information on your overall grade from your school/college. Is that right?

Each component (including coursework) will have an individual mark. You school will have access to this breakdown (likely in a spreadsheet, or similar), so just ask them for the per-component marks.

Note that individual components don't actually get grades. The marks from each component are combined to give a total mark, and the total mark is then assigned a grade. However, you'll often see mention of "notional component grades". These are unofficial grades assigned to each component (by using the per-subject grade boundaries and working backwards).

Short answer: ask your school/college.
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia
It sounds like you don't have the results slip (from Edexcel themselves) and instead have information on your overall grade from your school/college. Is that right?

Each component (including coursework) will have an individual mark. You school will have access to this breakdown (likely in a spreadsheet, or similar), so just ask them for the per-component marks.

Note that individual components don't actually get grades. The marks from each component are combined to give a total mark, and the total mark is then assigned a grade. However, you'll often see mention of "notional component grades". These are unofficial grades assigned to each component (by using the per-subject grade boundaries and working backwards).

Short answer: ask your school/college.

Thank you. Do you know if coursework grades are on Certificates? If I was for instance to say I got an A in both my English and History coursework on a CV how would I prove that if I don't actually have anything in writing? Thanks for your help.
Original post by Snowwh
Thank you. Do you know if coursework grades are on Certificates? If I was for instance to say I got an A in both my English and History coursework on a CV how would I prove that if I don't actually have anything in writing? Thanks for your help.

As I said above, "individual components don't actually get grades". So you didn't get any grade in the English or History coursework component itself. Your teacher may well have told you what that score was "worth", in terms of a grade. But it doesn't actually get a grade.

See this document on the Pearson Edexcel web site for their explanation. That explanation is pretty weak, frankly. OCR produce a much better, and simpler, explanation here. Note that they say, "The mark you get on each exam paper or non-exam assessment will be your component mark. You don’t get a grade for each component just a mark."

Your certificate will therefore not show component-level grades, as components don't get grades - only the whole subject does. You can see an example attached, which I took from this document on the Peason Edexcel web site. (Note the document covers AS and A levels, and the international variants of each - so may sure whatever you read is relevant to your qualifications.)

If you want to say, "I got an A in both my English and History coursework on a CV", there'd be nothing to stop you doing so. It's "unofficial" and doesn't really mean anything - but if you want to put that on your CV, nobody's going to stop you. The evidence (if it were ever challenged) would be the mark you got for the coursework component (from the Edexcel results slip) combined with the notional component-level grade boundaries for that year. Those notional boundaries for June 2022 are in the first link above.
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia
As I said above, "individual components don't actually get grades". So you didn't get any grade in the English or History coursework component itself. Your teacher may well have told you what that score was "worth", in terms of a grade. But it doesn't actually get a grade.

See this document on the Pearson Edexcel web site for their explanation. That explanation is pretty weak, frankly. OCR produce a much better, and simpler, explanation here. Note that they say, "The mark you get on each exam paper or non-exam assessment will be your component mark. You don’t get a grade for each component just a mark."

Your certificate will therefore not show component-level grades, as components don't get grades - only the whole subject does. You can see an example attached, which I took from this document on the Peason Edexcel web site. (Note the document covers AS and A levels, and the international variants of each - so may sure whatever you read is relevant to your qualifications.)

If you want to say, "I got an A in both my English and History coursework on a CV", there'd be nothing to stop you doing so. It's "unofficial" and doesn't really mean anything - but if you want to put that on your CV, nobody's going to stop you. The evidence (if it were ever challenged) would be the mark you got for the coursework component (from the Edexcel results slip) combined with the notional component-level grade boundaries for that year. Those notional boundaries for June 2022 are in the first link above.


Thank you so much for all that very kind and helpful of you.

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