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    Just for the record OP - I chose German because I didn't know what else to do.
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    I believe that psychology can be useful depending in which way you use your degree, many people go into human resources deparments in business and as they can deal with people better with the knowledge they gain from their degree. Other do research and others seem to not make much of their degree. Psychology is a good degree but it depends on which way you implement it in your life you could be extremly sucessful or just as you were if you did not do the degree.

    At the same time i would agree with people i have talked to that economics or medicine sets you up better for life as people may prefer it but in some places psychology is much more preffered.
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    Well psychology isn't exactly easy, and I'm sure it can get you into a lot of jobs that are unrelated to psychology itself.
    ^^ this is why.
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    i find this thread quite sad, think about the people actually studying psychology who have got aspirations your negativity could have a huge effect on them no degree is worthless, psychology is quite a specific degree alot of people go into counselling.
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    (Original post by Blátönn)
    Few degrees are 'useless', psychology isn't one of them.
    And which ones are those? :hmmm:
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    (Original post by Idi Amin)
    ...Then why do so many people want to do it?

    I heard that you can't really make anything of a degree in psychology unless you get a PhD in it.

    Yet so many people are interested in the course. My theory is that these people don't really know what to do with their lives and just chose psychology because they want to go to University but don't know which direction (career wise) they want to go in.
    Firstly, just because 'you heard' doesn't set Psychology as a useless degree in stone, I highly recommend you do your own research before having people influence your own opinion.

    Secondly, I'm not interested in the subject, and if I wasn't, I wouldn't have considered it in the first place! The only aspect I could agree with you on is that it annoys me too when people do it just because it's 'interesting', it makes me think, well, haven't you found it interesting in A Level? Surely this 'interest' will have flourished into a genuine desire to succeed in the occupation.

    Like a few on this thread, I chose Psychology as it's something I am good at, and something I envisage will have a fulfilling career. I am aware that I will be at least in my mid-twenties before I break into the particular branch (occupational) that I want to, yet, I think this is better than those who do it solely on 'interest' and then realise they have no idea on what to do, so yes, in that sense, it annoys me that their stigma is passed onto me and other psychology graduates who know this is what they want to do.

    Although I agree with you on some points, please do not generalise us all as indecisive individuals who have no direction, as for me at least, that's far from the truth. :cool:
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    (Original post by Jamsie_853)
    Firstly, just because 'you heard' doesn't set Psychology as a useless degree in stone, I highly recommend you do your own research before having people influence your own opinion.

    Secondly, I'm not interested in the subject, and if I wasn't, I wouldn't have considered it in the first place! The only aspect I could agree with you on is that it annoys me too when people do it just because it's 'interesting', it makes me think, well, haven't you found it interesting in A Level? Surely this 'interest' will have flourished into a genuine desire to succeed in the occupation.

    Like a few on this thread, I chose Psychology as it's something I am good at, and something I envisage will have a fulfilling career. I am aware that I will be at least in my mid-twenties before I break into the particular branch (occupational) that I want to, yet, I think this is better than those who do it solely on 'interest' and then realise they have no idea on what to do, so yes, in that sense, it annoys me that their stigma is passed onto me and other psychology graduates who know this is what they want to do.

    Although I agree with you on some points, please do not generalise us all as indecisive individuals who have no direction, as for me at least, that's far from the truth. :cool:
    What's wrong with not knowing what you're going to do after you graduate?

    I applied for psychology because I studied all three sciences to A level and decided that I didn't want to carry any of them on to degree level; but wanted to do something where I could continue to use the skills I'd gained.

    I'd never studied psychology before, other than reading the odd book on the subject, and I had no idea whether I wanted to be a psychologist after my degree, I chose to study it purely out of interest, assuming that once I'd been on the course for a couple of years I'd have more of an idea if it was what I wanted to make a career out of.

    I'm now in my third year (of four), and I have almost come to the conclusion that I'd like to be an educational psychologist. However, come this time next year, there's every chance I might have changed my mind and I may be applying for all sorts of graduate programs which would not lead to a career in psychology, but that I believe psychology graduates are extremely well suited for and that I would enjoy.

    At the end of the day, I'm only 20 and I'm not required to know exactly what's going to make me happy for the next 50 years right at this moment.
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    (Original post by Me Myself I)
    What's wrong with not knowing what you're going to do after you graduate?

    I applied for psychology because I studied all three sciences to A level and decided that I didn't want to carry any of them on to degree level; but wanted to do something where I could continue to use the skills I'd gained.

    I'd never studied psychology before, other than reading the odd book on the subject, and I had no idea whether I wanted to be a psychologist after my degree, I chose to study it purely out of interest, assuming that once I'd been on the course for a couple of years I'd have more of an idea if it was what I wanted to make a career out of.

    I'm now in my third year (of four), and I have almost come to the conclusion that I'd like to be an educational psychologist. However, come this time next year, there's every chance I might have changed my mind and I may be applying for all sorts of graduate programs which would not lead to a career in psychology, but that I believe psychology graduates are extremely well suited for and that I would enjoy.

    At the end of the day, I'm only 20 and I'm not required to know exactly what's going to make me happy for the next 50 years right at this moment.
    That's fair enough, I took quite a general assumption that everyone who does it purely on 'interest' has no idea on what they want to do after.
    I think I plan too much and am not spontaneous enough, but I just want to give myself a sense of direction after graduating if you can understand my view.

    I apologise if I offended you in any way.
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    If Psychology is the most useless degree...

    ...Then why do so many people want to do it?

    I heard that you can't really make anything of a degree in psychology unless you get a PhD in it.

    Yet so many people are interested in the course. My theory is that these people don't really know what to do with their lives and just chose psychology because they want to go to University but don't know which direction (career wise) they want to go in."

    Why does it even matter?.My theory is 90% of people have no idea what they really want to do in life.Even nerdy oxbridges,who sit in comfy office jobs after they graduate..start to queston their purpose in life,once they realised all the studying and money didnt get them laid.

    okay ,ok here is my take on it Mugabe.

    Psychology,like any other subject provides knowledge ..most notably of the human mind,Do you know what a brain is?.well this thing apparently is very powerful.and having enough knowledge in psychology enables us to fine tune it and control our emotions such as stress,anger,fear and even confidence.
    Knowing and being able to control our minds above the average person,enables us to function at a higher level,functioning at a higher level naturally improves every aspect of a humans life.

    Instead of seeking approval from mummy and daddy and the rest of the universe.
    the person becomes an individual,and starts to live life for oneself.

    this may seem very far of for you..but I wil try to explain.Some people realised somehow that serving other people produces an overwhelming amount of purpose and forfilment.

    Okay Mugabe.here is what you can do with a degree in psychology

    psychology is used in advertising.and probably provides the answer to why your tissue paper reserves and vaseline keep running out.

    to anyone reading this thread .Do not let this influence your decision on whether or not to do a degree in psychology.
    If you follow your passion you will NEVER go wrong.
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    You know if someone who was very pasionate in Year 11 or Sixth form, & they came to this thread they may really be put off , please do say positive things
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    (Original post by Vintage <3)
    You know if someone who was very pasionate in Year 11 or Sixth form, & they came to this thread they may really be put off , please do say positive things
    Well I'm 'pro-Psychology degrees' but I don't see the point in that. I know if someone had told me the truth about a language degree before I got here I would've tried to change it asap.
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    oops i forgot to quote it,then again i couldn't be bothered
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    (Original post by Jamsie_853)
    That's fair enough, I took quite a general assumption that everyone who does it purely on 'interest' has no idea on what they want to do after.
    I think I plan too much and am not spontaneous enough, but I just want to give myself a sense of direction after graduating if you can understand my view.

    I apologise if I offended you in any way.
    He he he that's my problem too :p: I just didn't have a clue what I wanted to do degree-wise - the problem is that every prospectus/open day makes every course in every place seem appealing...

    You didn't offend me, I just thought it was a bit of an over-generalisation to say that it was bad not to have your whole life planned out by the time you're 18.

    Sorry, I feel like such a hypocrite saying this - if anyone who knew me saw this they'd be amazed - I usually have everything about my life planned to the very last detail...
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    (Original post by kiss_me_now9)
    Well I'm 'pro-Psychology degrees' but I don't see the point in that. I know if someone had told me the truth about a language degree before I got here I would've tried to change it asap.
    What's this 'truth' about a language degree? :confused:
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    i read somewhere 60% + of psych grads go on to do accounting....
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    (Original post by Fandellos)
    i read somewhere 60% + of psych grads go on to do accounting....
    I think who ever wrote that was misinformed.

    If anyone actually cares you can see where real psych grads are after 6 months of graduating here

    So lots of people go into social and welfare proffessions, and business, finance and management.

    Around 25% of psych graduates are studying at a level higher than degree, either to go into one of the areas of psychology, or another, often related, career.
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    psychology as a discipline and as a career path is a niche subject (you only need a certain number of people with the skills), yet it's vastly oversubscribed and hence most people who do it will end up working in nothing to do with psychology.

    It's probably popular because it's seen as a 'softer' alternative to the more difficult and less interesting sciences where there really is a need for graduates, such as chemistry and physics.
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    (Original post by Toxic Tears)
    What's this 'truth' about a language degree? :confused:
    That it's not what I wanted at all, and it's stupid not to check what modules you'll be doing before you even apply!

    At my uni, there is a bigger emphasis on literature and pronunciation - 3 hours each a week - than grammar - 1 hour a week. To get really good grades you need to be damn near fluent in the language and having a low a level in the target language is really not enough; I'd say an A/B student would fare much better than I did (a high D/low C student).
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    The real irony would be if the OP ended up requiring the services of a psychologist in the future, and having to make use of their "useless degree".

    Btw. Studying this "useless subject" allowed me to:

    - go through university without any debts.
    - Publish 10 peer reviewed articles and a
    decent H index.
    - Free travel to the US/ Switzerland for 3 years.
    - Paid my tuition and gave me a healthy salary to live on while studying.
    - Gave me the title "doctor" and a starting salary of 30k which will probably end up somewhere around the 70-80k range at todays rates.

    Not bad for a useless subject huh?
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    I never really get/got phycology, it's interesting enough, but a lifetimes study, no thanks.
 
 
 
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