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Corporate ambition- seriously regret studying Scots Law

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(edited 1 year ago)
Ok, so I've been doing a bit of reading and as I understand it, I could either (i) qualify as a Scots lawyer (my diploma funded by the Scottish firm before my traineeship with them), THEN do the SQE to qualify in England and Wales (and I suppose move firm to get more money) or (ii) do the GDL immediately after uni (ideally with a traineeship (with a higher salary at the Scots firm) lined up so with that firm paying for the GDL course) (then the LPC to qualify in England and Wales?) Vis-a-vis the last point, if you're doing a traineeship with a firm, do you still need to do the LPC? How does that work?
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 2
Original post by playingcatchup
Ok, so I've been doing a bit of reading and as I understand it, I could either (i) qualify as a Scots lawyer (my diploma funded by the Scottish firm before my traineeship with them), THEN do the SQE to qualify in England and Wales (and I suppose move firm to get more money) or (ii) do the GDL immediately after uni (ideally with a traineeship (with a higher salary at the Scots firm) lined up so with that firm paying for the GDL course) (then the LPC to qualify in England and Wales?) Vis-a-vis the last point, if you're doing a traineeship with a firm, do you still need to do the LPC? How does that work?

Hey,

If your goal is to become a commercial solicitor in London then do not feel like doing a Scots Law degree will hold you back. It might take you a little longer to start a training contract etc (because of undertaking extra years of study), but I would encourage you to think long-term about it and not worry too much about this. It's good that you are thinking about this now, but remember you are still early on in your studies and have plenty of time to think about what you want, and to explore the opportunities that are out there both in Scotland and in London if you wish.

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I feel like you should try and talk to someone about this. There is a lot to consider - and the information isn't as clear and easy to find as it could be to be honest. Basically, if you want to work in London I would recommend you research firms in London that interest you and see what they say about when you can apply to them, and what they will require you to complete before you start a training contract with them if you are successful.

A lot has changed recently, and the future is not 100% certain. The GDL and LPC are currently being phased out - so much of the information on this route to qualification risks being outdated. The new route is called the SQE, and as far as I know, most major firms have already announced (or at least internally decided) their transition plans for this.

For context, and an example of how this works: I studied Scots Law and before I start my training contract I will complete the 'PGDL' (which is a new replacement course for the GDL) which will take one year (Many Scot's law students are often eligible to apply for exemptions for certain modules on the PGDL/GDL due to their prior studies). Then, the following year I will complete the SQE.

You do not need the Diploma to do the SQE.
Original post by Arran_R
Hey,

If your goal is to become a commercial solicitor in London then do not feel like doing a Scots Law degree will hold you back. It might take you a little longer to start a training contract etc (because of undertaking extra years of study), but I would encourage you to think long-term about it and not worry too much about this. It's good that you are thinking about this now, but remember you are still early on in your studies and have plenty of time to think about what you want, and to explore the opportunities that are out there both in Scotland and in London if you wish.

-----------------

I feel like you should try and talk to someone about this. There is a lot to consider - and the information isn't as clear and easy to find as it could be to be honest. Basically, if you want to work in London I would recommend you research firms in London that interest you and see what they say about when you can apply to them, and what they will require you to complete before you start a training contract with them if you are successful.

A lot has changed recently, and the future is not 100% certain. The GDL and LPC are currently being phased out - so much of the information on this route to qualification risks being outdated. The new route is called the SQE, and as far as I know, most major firms have already announced (or at least internally decided) their transition plans for this.

For context, and an example of how this works: I studied Scots Law and before I start my training contract I will complete the 'PGDL' (which is a new replacement course for the GDL) which will take one year (Many Scot's law students are often eligible to apply for exemptions for certain modules on the PGDL/GDL due to their prior studies). Then, the following year I will complete the SQE.

You do not need the Diploma to do the SQE.


Thank you so much for such an informative answer. I really do appreciate it, especially since the available information isn't particularly clear, as you mentioned!
Corporate firms in London will accept your application. Worst case scenario: you have to study for an extra year. Please take a look at their websites before you start panicking further, they will no doubt be helpful.

For example, Linklaters will require you to study a PGDL before you start their bespoke SQE1 course:

"Although no longer a regulatory requirement, City Consortium graduates without an England and Wales qualifying law degree will be required to study the PGDL (Postgraduate Diploma in Law) at BPP prior to starting on the CCP. The programme length of the PGDL is 8 months." (source: https://careers.linklaters.com/en/early-careers/your-application)
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 5
Original post by playingcatchup
Thank you so much for such an informative answer. I really do appreciate it, especially since the available information isn't particularly clear, as you mentioned!


No problem, if you had any specific questions that you think I could help with just let me know.

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