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    Hi,

    I am currently applying to university to do Law (see the sign for my choices)...

    However, I am aware of the insane competition for the first four places and, as a mature student, I am not overly confident in being accepted by one of them...

    I was recently thinking of the other options that seem interesting and exciting to me, such as english literature or philosophy, and considering reapplying to one of those courses next year, provided I do not get an offer for one of these courses in this application cycle...

    I know I would be required to complete the GDL if I wish to practice as a lawyer, but was just wandering as to how are those degrees looked upon by the law firms and whether securing a training contract would be a possibility in this case (provided I graduate with a 1st or 2.1)...

    Would really appreciate your opinions!

    Thanks!
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    Philosophy will hone your deabting/mooting skills and analytical capabilities to a greater degree fo sho.

    Lots of philos go into law. It's quite well regarded.
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    Any degree can be 'converted' into a law degree.
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    (Original post by Cerulean)
    Any degree can be 'converted' into a law degree.
    I know that it can, however, not every degree is regarded as "traditional" and therefore getting the training contract or pupilage might prove to be extra difficult...
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    (Original post by fraternité)
    Philosophy will hone your deabting/mooting skills and analytical capabilities to a greater degree fo sho.

    Lots of philos go into law. It's quite well regarded.

    what about english literature?
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    Philosophy is pretty traditional but I doubt many people will frown on an English degree either, so just do the one you enjoy most.
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    I don't think there are any real preferences for pre-GDL degrees. I know that tutors for American law schools (which are all post-graduate) often say that Politics or History make the best pre-law degrees, but I can't see it really mattering all that much. Philosophy might be a bit better for debate, but it's not going to matter particularly.

    In terms of employability, from what I've read, while GDL-holders and LLB-holders are hired with about half/half distribution, there are far more GDL-holders who actually apply so competition is stiffer. It seems like one is more likely to get a training contract with an MC or GC firm if one has an LLB from a top undergraduate university (basically, the ones you've applied to already). Plus, the cost of a GDL + LPC on top of an undergrad degree is worth considering; it's quite a bit more money spent before you get your first job as a lawyer, and with the 2 year traineeship on top of that it's even more time before you get to practice properly.
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    (Original post by eve_22)
    what about english literature?
    Will not train your analytic/debating skills to the same extent and I believe is a significantly less common route to take.

    I cannot say if it is equally regarded.
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    I was under the impression that good degree result + respected institution would open the doors a bit more, no?
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)
    I don't think there are any real preferences for pre-GDL degrees. I know that tutors for American law schools (which are all post-graduate) often say that Politics or History make the best pre-law degrees, but I can't see it really mattering all that much. Philosophy might be a bit better for debate, but it's not going to matter particularly.

    In terms of employability, from what I've read, while GDL-holders and LLB-holders are hired with about half/half distribution, there are far more GDL-holders who actually apply so competition is stiffer. It seems like one is more likely to get a training contract with an MC or GC firm if one has an LLB from a top undergraduate university (basically, the ones you've applied to already). Plus, the cost of a GDL + LPC on top of an undergrad degree is worth considering; it's quite a bit more money spent before you get your first job as a lawyer, and with the 2 year traineeship on top of that it's even more time before you get to practice properly.

    I do realise the costs involved and the possibility of not becoming a solicitor/a barrister due to the fierce competition at all levels, when it comes to GDL, LPC and training contracts...

    However, I still believe that obtaining a good degree in philosophy or english literature from Oxbridge/UCL/KCL etc. would probably stand me at a better chance then an LLB Law degree from university like Essex, Kent etc. (I am not, by any means, trying to imply they are bad universities; I am just acknowledging the fact that the ones mentioned at the very begining are simply more respected)...

    I, however, had no experience in studying philosophy or english literature so far and am basing my opinion of the courses on my secondary school studies and extra curriculum activities...I loved literature classes back at home and am addicted to reading! As for philosophy, I read Sophie's world when I was about 15 and since then re-read it twice

    Is it really enough information to base my course choice on though?I dont know...I love law very much and am sure that it is what I want to do in the future, however, things dont always turn out like you want it to be...That's life

    I am not, however, losing my hopes yet, just contemplating over the idea of what I WOULD do in case I get rejected...which, I really really hope, wont happen with all of my five choices
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    You are right; a non-law degree from a Golden Triangle university and a GDL will most likely serve you better than a law degree from a lower university, however, if you do get rejected from all your options (which seems pretty unlikely, IIRC from other threads you're perfectly well academically qualified), my recommendation would be that you spend the year attempting to get some stuff to shore up a law application for the next application cycle rather than applying to something else entirely. If you can't get anything that'd help, then so be it, but as it stands you're a good candidate and with a bit of work experience as a legal clerk or a paralegal or the like, or even something involved in politics rather than law, then you should be able to get into at least one UofLondon institution would much difficulty. I'm just not sure the significant additional costs of doing a GDL are worth it in the long run.
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    A lawyer friend of mine came to the profession having done a masters in English
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    I'm just curious how English Language compares to English Literature in this respect? I'm open to all options for the future really so it'd be nice to have an idea.
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)
    You are right; a non-law degree from a Golden Triangle university and a GDL will most likely serve you better than a law degree from a lower university, however, if you do get rejected from all your options (which seems pretty unlikely, IIRC from other threads you're perfectly well academically qualified), my recommendation would be that you spend the year attempting to get some stuff to shore up a law application for the next application cycle rather than applying to something else entirely. If you can't get anything that'd help, then so be it, but as it stands you're a good candidate and with a bit of work experience as a legal clerk or a paralegal or the like, or even something involved in politics rather than law, then you should be able to get into at least one UofLondon institution would much difficulty. I'm just not sure the significant additional costs of doing a GDL are worth it in the long run.
    Thank you for your advice...it is always nice to hear a bit of encouraging words I am really hoping that one of my choices will accept me, particularly Oxford or UCL,as I am really looking forward to studying the module of jurisprudence in their courses...

    Queen Mary is my last and most unlikely choice and I probably wouldnt go there anyway, even if they offer me a place...I know it sounds weird, as it is a quite well regarded university, somewhere at the top 20 in ranking leagues, however, it just doesnt seem like a place I would enjoy spending three years at...

    Being a mature student, I am aware of my situation and was simply considering my options...however, you seem to be right-law is something I REALLY want to do and I would probably even regret not trying to apply again in the following year...

    Should the worse come to worst, I will most likely take your advice, enchance my application by taking another course and gaining some legal experience, and get on with my application in the following year...
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    You are fine with your choices. I agree with the costs issue but this is for you.

    Good luck.
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    I have heard that the most "respected" degrees are those which are essay based and require analytical skills.. However any degree can be converted so as long as you have a good academic record and attend a respected university you'll be fine. Although my inclination would be to go with philosophy - it's a particularly highly regarded degree, or so I have been led to believe.
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    Philosophy and English Literature are both going to be considered much of a muchness when it comes to training contracts so I wouldn't make your decision based upon that. Do the one you (think) you're going to be best at and enjoy. I don't love my degree but I'm fairly good at it so in the end that's what's proved most useful for the future.
 
 
 
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