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    Yes, it is a problem that Oxbridge applicants from private schools are way out of proportion to those from state schools -

    But why should it be down to universities to make up for substandard government education???? It's not their responsibility to ensure everyone receives good enough secondary education.

    And wouldn't you rather get into a university on your own merit, rather than because they feel sorry for you because of where you went to school???
    I'd find that rather patronising tbh.
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    (Original post by Amy***)
    It might not be a status symbol for you but it certainly is for others - for the wealthy. From your post it seems you wouldn't consider yourself to have 'wealth' (i.e. unearned income) so I don't see why you would be so offended by what I have said.

    My parents also work hard but chose to send me to a state school - i believe I've had a very good education thankyou very much. If you're offended by my thoughts on private schools why should I not be offended by your apparent snobbery and ignorance concerning the state sector.

    Obviously you are ignoring the point that everybody deserves a good education - whether their parents worked hard or not.
    Then criticise state schools not private schools.
    And I don't have any ignorance regarding the state sector, if you actually read my posts. What snobbery and ignorance, you hypocrite? I'm simply defending the morals of privately educated students.
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    Agreed. By closing private and grammar schools
    by closing private schools yes, grammer I'm not so certain of, because people tend to learn better when they are surrounded by people with similar learning abilities.
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    (Original post by 4x4)
    by closing private schools yes, grammer I'm not so certain of, because people tend to learn better when they are surrounded by people with similar learning abilities.
    In large comprehensive schools there is more than enough scope to set by ability. In fact my old school split each year in half before setting them.

    The flaw with Grammar schools is their admissions procedures benefit those from certain backgrounds at the expense of others. If you look at the areas that fully operate the 11+ system the effects are obvious.
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    (Original post by Elementric)
    Then criticise state schools not private schools.
    And I don't have any ignorance regarding the state sector, if you actually read my posts. What snobbery and ignorance, you hypocrite? I'm simply defending the morals of privately educated students.
    You have total ignorance - otherwise you would not be supporting private schools. Unless you are ideologically opposed to social justice...?
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    If someone has the money to send a child to private school and wants their child to have a "better" education, then they should send them away.
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    (Original post by emmers1990)
    If someone has the money to send a child to private school and wants their child to have a "better" education, then they should send them away.
    But they should not be allowed to return to the state system so easily. Which is what most people especially dislike.
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    In large comprehensive schools there is more than enough scope to set by ability. In fact my old school split each year in half before setting them.

    The flaw with Grammar schools is their admissions procedures benefit those from certain backgrounds at the expense of others. If you look at the areas that fully operate the 11+ system the effects are obvious.
    Perhaps, I don't actually know much about grammar schools, apart from that they are supposed to be selective (but I thought about selective based on intelligence). Personally I always preferred going to a smaller school where lots of smart people went than going to a very large comprehensive where you'd be set in a similar ability level class, but that was because the smaller one always seemed to have much more 'school spirit'.
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    You have total ignorance - otherwise you would not be supporting private schools. Unless you are ideologically opposed to social justice...?
    Please go tell your ******** to someone else.
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    (Original post by 4x4)
    Perhaps, I don't actually know much about grammar schools, apart from that they are supposed to be selective (but I thought about selective based on intelligence). Personally I always preferred going to a smaller school where lots of smart people went than going to a very large comprehensive where you'd be set in a similar ability level class, but that was because the smaller one always seemed to have much more 'school spirit'.
    I agree with you on the school sizes - some are way too big. In a school of 600 people plus a 6th form however (small school) there is still enough space to adequately set students.

    My suggestion would be at that level to take the bottom 25% out and put them in a special school with an intensive catch up program - there is simply no point putting them in a comp when they are almost certain to fail.
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    I swear we get this topic at least once a week...

    Anyway, my position is that it's wrong to be able to buy your children's futures. I propose to end school's charitable status, and massively increase funding for state education to reduce class sizes to the same as in the private sector, and the introduction of a 'pupil premium', whereby students who are more disadvantaged receive more state funding.
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    (Original post by dollydaydream)
    I am so glad I wasn't private schooled. I think that most private schools don't set people up for dealing with all kinds of people in the "real world". I have nothing against private schooling but in my area, it makes a real difference. The majority of private schooled kids in my area are so arrogant and put themselves above the rest, it's a real shame.

    I'm definately not saying that everyone is like that, it's just my personal view.

    I can get the same quality of teaching at my local sixth form college, getting the same grades and not having to pay for it.
    I am more than capable of dealing will people in the real world, thanks.

    If you have happen to have misconceptions, do please keep them to yourself.
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    Let people do what they want with their money...
    And the competitiveness of private schools helps gives Britain its competitive edge. There's nothing wrong with that. Some state schools do the same too. There's not much point in complaining - if peopel can pay for competitive education then let them.
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    I'm not rich, but I was privately educated. My parents saved up so I could go. You should stop assuming everyone who is privately educated is well off. It's not always the case.
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    (Original post by ashy)
    I am more than capable of dealing will people in the real world, thanks.
    You would be, but physics took care of that for you :p:
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    I would ask: would the people against private schools therefore argue that it is better to leech off the state? Would I be looked down upon for having private healthcare, as well? You should see them as doing the country a service; reducing the strain on the state sector :p:

    If people want to spend money on a product, they're welcome to. That doesn't make them snobs, or arrogant.
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    (Original post by ashy)
    I would ask: would the people against private schools therefore argue that it is better to leech off the state? Would I be looked down upon for having private healthcare, as well? You should see them as doing the country a service; reducing the strain on the state sector :p:

    If people want to spend money on a product, they're welcome to. That doesn't make them snobs, or arrogant.
    1. It's not 'leeching', it's the mutual provision of a good necessary for the good of all.

    2. I try not to judge people, but I will say that your private healthcare buys up the time of NHS doctors and bumps needy but poor people down the waiting list. Make of that what you will.

    3. You're not 'reducing the strain on the state sector', you're trying to delegitimise the state sector by opting out of it.

    4. No, it doesn't make them snobs or arrogant. That doesn't mean they're doing the right thing.
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    Some people in the state college I go to now are seriously bitter. Let it go people. It's a free world, let 'em do what they want. You're not the ones paying their fees. So don't complain!
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    (Original post by Gremlins)
    1. It's not 'leeching', it's the mutual provision of a good necessary for the good of all.

    2. I try not to judge people, but I will say that your private healthcare buys up the time of NHS doctors and bumps needy but poor people down the waiting list. Make of that what you will.

    3. You're not 'reducing the strain on the state sector', you're trying to delegitimise the state sector by opting out of it.

    4. No, it doesn't make them snobs or arrogant. That doesn't mean they're doing the right thing.
    1. Those in the private sector still pay tax, therefore assisting in the provision of the system for those who need it.

    2. Many doctors never intend to work for the NHS anyway, and some who do work as private doctors work for the NHS because it makes them feel better and because they want to. These doctors probably wouldn't work solely for the NHS regardless.

    3. Opting out is a perfectly legitimate right when the system in place doesn't cater to the needs or standards set by the individual. Simply paying for a superior product doesn't make the other products worse.

    4. Are you suggesting that sending children to a private school is morally wrong? I'd argue that expecting the state to cater for all your needs is selfish and "wrong" when you're able to provide for yourself.
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    Not this thread AGAIN! Could you not just search for an old one?
    How is this still a controversial issue on TSR, it's old old old.
 
 
 
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