The Student Room Group

Richest Colleges in Oxford University

Oxford University

See the attachment pdf file for a printable list. :smile:

1.

St John's £592.3m

2.

Christ Church £512.9m

3.

All Souls £429.8m

4.

The Queen's College £329.0m

5.

New £287.0m

6.

Magdalen £273.0m

7.

Merton £272.1m

8.

Nuffield £240.8m

9.

Somerville £218.5m

10.

Jesus £209.7m

11.

University £198.4m

12.

Corpus Christi £169.5m

13.

Brasenose £164.7m

14.

Trinity £154.5m

15.

Lincoln £146.6m

16.

Balliol £132.3m

17.

Wadham £131.0m

18.

Keble £124.2m

19.

Exeter £123.1m

20.

St Hilda's £111.3m

21.

St Catherine's £103.4m

22.

Oriel £92.9m

23.

Pembroke £81.6m

24.

Hertford £79.6m

25.

Worcester £78.9m

26.

Wolfson £74.2m

27.

St Edmund Hall £70.6m

28.

St Antony's £70.4m

29.

St Hugh's £65.3m

30.

St Anne's £64.8m

31.

Lady Margaret Hall £64.7m

32.

St Peter's £60.8m

33.

Green Templeton £54.8m

34.

Linacre £29.1m

35.

Mansfield £27.4m

36.

Harris Manchester £24.8m

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Knew St Johns would be top of the list, but some of the results are surprising
I want to do my MSc in Taxation at St.Johns College, Oxford University in 10 years time. :smile: lol
Original post by Oxford Mum
Knew St Johns would be top of the list, but some of the results are surprising

Yes, I thought Balliol and University would be richer than others and also Merton!? :s-smilie:
Original post by aaq1
with Magdallen selling 40% of its stake in Oxford Science Park for £160m, it probably is the richest college (with the the overall valuation of Oxford Science Park at £400m)

what does it mean for the colleges at the bottom of the list? are they in trouble financially? do they provide less facilities to their students?

1. Oxford Student mentions a Singaporean investor purchased a 40% stake in the Oxford Science Park, and so Magdalen, is now the richest college, but St. Johns College is not far behind: https://www.oxfordstudent.com/2021/10/17/magdalen-sells-40-land-stake-to-singapore-sovereign-wealth-fund/

2. Most of the constituent colleges of Oxford University are not in trouble financially.

3. A college like St. Peter's does not have accommodation for second year students in the college and some others too. They have to live out, and food is not as cheap as the richer colleges and sports facilities are shared with other colleges.
Original post by thegeek888
1. Oxford Student mentions a Singaporean investor purchased a 40% stake in the Oxford Science Park, and so Magdalen, is now the richest college, but St. Johns College is not far behind: https://www.oxfordstudent.com/2021/10/17/magdalen-sells-40-land-stake-to-singapore-sovereign-wealth-fund/

2. Most of the constituent colleges of Oxford University are not in trouble financially.

3. A college like St. Peter's does not have accommodation for second year students in the college and some others too. They have to live out, and food is not as cheap as the richer colleges and sports facilities are shared with other colleges.

There are also alumni willing to help.

Every year, students like my elder son have telethons, where they phone alumni and ask them to donate to the college. This can be to maintain the choir etc. It’s tough if you phone and get the wife, who can get annoyed as she wants to keep the money for themselves! However sometimes they can get an investment banker who will say, I’ve just got a bonus and will send the college £1million.

Some alumni credit Oxford for getting them where they are and are grateful. One such person is sir Ronald Cohen, nicknamed the father of modern equity. Exeter wanted a new site for second year accommodation. We were competing for the site next door to Worcester, who wanted it as well. Because of Cohen’s donation, we were allowed to trump Worcester’s offer ( although they objected because it was going to obstruct one of the don’s views).

Yes, some other students and alumni ( like my son and I) donated a tiny amount, however if you donated £10,000 you could get a plaque on the door of a student room or your name on a flagstone outside.

Of course the building is called the Cohen quad, and second years, if you look up at one of the “champagne” roof tiles, that comes courtesy of Oxford mum!
Original post by Oxford Mum
There are also alumni willing to help.

Every year, students like my elder son have telethons, where they phone alumni and ask them to donate to the college. This can be to maintain the choir etc. It’s tough if you phone and get the wife, who can get annoyed as she wants to keep the money for themselves! However sometimes they can get an investment banker who will say, I’ve just got a bonus and will send the college £1million.

Some alumni credit Oxford for getting them where they are and are grateful. One such person is sir Ronald Cohen, nicknamed the father of modern equity. Exeter wanted a new site for second year accommodation. We were competing for the site next door to Worcester, who wanted it as well. Because of Cohen’s donation, we were allowed to trump Worcester’s offer ( although they objected because it was going to obstruct one of the don’s views).

Yes, some other students and alumni ( like my son and I) donated a tiny amount, however if you donated £10,000 you could get a plaque on the door of a student room or your name on a flagstone outside.

Of course the building is called the Cohen quad, and second years, if you look up at one of the “champagne” roof tiles, that comes courtesy of Oxford mum!

Oxford Mum, I will be applying to the Oxford 1+1 MBA and MSc programme near the end of this decade but before this I will apply to Cambridge University, LSE, UCL, KCL and SOAS for my Bachelor's in Law degree. Whichever Law degree courses I get offered a place from will receive donations when I’m wealthy as a businessman globally. I still remember most of my A-Level Maths and Chemistry content, so it is just revision and the textbooks are excellent with model answers too, so A-Level Further Maths at A* grade too won't be too difficult to achieve. From September 2023 to June 2025, I will be studying them and A-Level German, Spanish and French as well. I should get at least 3A* 3A. So I will be well qualified for TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY.

I won't be able to take millions with me to my grave, and also charity work is the only thing that erases sins whilst in the grave. So it makes sense to donate generously to Oxford and Cambridge colleges. :wink:

Wow...It will be amazing to see your 'plaque' at Exeter College, and I have not yet decided between St. John's, Magdalen, University, Christ Church, Merton and Oriel. But I will visit them all at open days in the future. :biggrin:

I have been analysing the rankings of the top 5000 American companies every year since the early 2010s. So I have a pretty good understanding of different companies business models.

1. Advertising & Marketing
2. Business Products
3. Construction
4. Computer Hardware
5. Consumer Products
6. eCommerce
7. Education
8. Financial Services
9. Food & Beverage
10. Government Services
11. Health Products
12. Insurance
13. IT Services
14. Legal
15. Logistics & Transportation
16. Manufacturing
17. Real Estate
18. Recruitment
19. Retail
20. Software
21. Travel & Hospitality

1. MSc in Criminology & Criminal Justice

This is a suitable MSc for me, but I would prefer the Bachelor’s in Civil Law (BCL) or MSc in Law & Finance. But I like the fact, that there are tutorials like how undergraduates are also taught by the academics. Also, admission is by written work essays
a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours, usually a minimum weighted average of 67%.

You will need to register three referees who can give an informed view of your academic ability and suitability for the course.
You will be required to supply supporting documents with your application, including an official transcript and a CV/résumé

Performance at interview
Interviews are not normally held as part of the admissions process.
There are 8 applicants per place.
Three academic referees are preferred.

Statement of purpose/personal statement:

A minimum of 800 words to a maximum of 1,000 words
Your statement should be written in English and explain your motivation for applying for the course at Oxford, your relevant experience and education, and the specific academic areas that interest you and/or you intend to specialise in.
If possible, please ensure that the word count is clearly displayed on the document.
This will be assessed for:
your academic reasons for applying
evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
the ability to present a reasoned case in English
commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
capacity for sustained and intensive academic work
reasoning ability
ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pac

Written work:
Two essays, a maximum of 2,000 words each

2. MSc Law & Finance
As part of the curriculum, you will take three core courses

Financial Economics
Finance
Economics of Corporate Transactions

These are supplemented by courses from the Law Faculty and Saïd Business School including:

Principles of Financial Regulation
Corporate Finance Law
Entrepreneurial Finance Project
Private Equity and Debt
Investing in Private Markets
Investing in Public Equity
Mergers, Acquisitions and Restructuring
There are also pre-sessional courses in maths and financial reporting.

Fees
£38,945 for 2020-21 academic year.

Entry requirements
Applicants are normally expected to have, or be predicted to achieve:
An undergraduate honours degree (or equivalent). Your undergraduate degree is expected to be either a first class or very strong upper second-class degree.
A background in law. This should be either a degree in law or an equivalent professional qualification, including PgDL/CPE.
Location
You will attend sessions at both the Faculty of Law and Saïd Business School, University of Oxford.

Core courses
There are two core finance courses (Finance and First Principles of Financial Economics), and a core interdisciplinary course (Law and Economics of Corporate Transactions). Finance is taught during the first and second terms. First Principles of Financial Economics is taught during the first term and Law and Economics of Corporate Transactions is taught during the second and third terms.

Law stream
In addition to the core MLF courses, students selecting the Law Stream will take two law electives from a tailored list of about 10 law courses that are available to students on the Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL). Students may choose to select two half options in law in place of a law elective, thereby allowing students to study a wider range of subjects. The list of law electives comprises courses that are business law-oriented and thus are intended to complement both each other and the MLF course as a whole. In taking these electives, you will be joined by students taking the Law Faculty's other taught graduate courses, the BCL and the Magister Juris (MJur).

References
You will need to register three referees who can give an informed view of your academic ability and suitability for the course.

I love the fact the Oxford Law department is based in the Bodleian Law Library!!! :biggrin: lol

The Law Faculty is fortunate to have outstanding library facilities provided by the Bodleian Law Library. As part of the Bodleian, the Law Library shares in all the advantages of being part of the largest university library in the country, including the receipt, under legal deposit legislation, of legal material published in the UK and Ireland.

The Law Library offers the vast majority of its holdings - some 550,000 items - on open shelves across four floors. Selected low-use material is housed in a book storage facility and is retrievable within half a day.

Annual fees for entry in 2023-24
Home £45,490

3. BCL Bachelor in Civil Law

Referees:
Three overall, of which at least two must be academic.

A CV/résumé is compulsory for all applications. Most applicants choose to submit a document of one to two pages highlighting their academic achievements and any relevant professional experience.

Statement of purpose/personal statement:
A maximum of 300 words
Your statement should be written in English and explain your motivation for applying for the course at Oxford, your relevant experience and education, and the specific areas that interest you and/or you intend to specialise in.

This will be assessed for your reasons for applying, evidence of motivation for, and understanding of, the proposed area of study, your ability to present a reasoned case in English, and your commitment to the area of law and finance.

Written work:
One essay, a maximum of 2,000 words
The work must be written in English and on a legal topic. Academic work from your most recent qualification is preferred, but work written in a professional context may be submitted if academic work is not readily available.
Your written work may be an extract of the required length from a longer piece - in such cases, the work should be prefaced by a note which puts it in context.

The word count does not need to include any bibliography or brief footnotes.

The Bachelor’s in Civil Law (BCL) has been a pivotal feature of Oxford's law provision since the sixteenth century. This rich history has helped to maintain its status as the most highly regarded taught masters-level qualification in the common law world.
5. Associate Dean for Graduate Studies (Taught Courses)

The Faculty of Law is located in the St Cross Building, where the majority of teaching takes place. The St Cross Building is also the home of the Bodleian Law Library, which has 40 networked computers, giving access to all the online resources within the Library and University. There is a Graduate Reading Room, a large seminar room, two IT rooms, and three small ‘discussion rooms’ for private study or group work.

6 APPS PER PLACE

Why not an LLM?

The BCL and MJur are the only taught graduate courses in the world which make use of tutorials as a central part of their teaching (as well as the seminars and lectures more generally used on LLM and other masters courses).

The tutorial is an intensive discussion between a tutor and typically two to four students, providing an opportunity for students to present their ideas and discuss their work with leading academics.

It is this level of access to some of the best known teachers and researchers across a wide range of legal subjects which perhaps more than anything distinguishes the BCL and MJur from their LLM counterparts, though the intellectual rigour of both courses, and the cosmopolitan mix of students are also important factors in the success and reputation of the two courses.

Annual fees for entry in 2023-24
Fee status Annual Course fees
Home £27,460
Overseas £41,480

Referees:
Three overall, academic strongly preferred
Whilst you must register three referees, the department may start the assessment of your application if two of the three references are submitted by the course deadline and your application is otherwise complete. Please note that you may still be required to ensure your third referee supplies a reference for consideration.

A CV/résumé is compulsory for all applications. Most applicants choose to submit a document of one to two pages highlighting their academic achievements and any relevant professional experience.

Personal statement:

A maximum of 300 words

This may be assessed on your ability to present a reasoned case in English if this cannot be established from the rest of the application; but in most cases the statement will not constitute part of the formal assessment, though may provide information relevant to consideration for scholarships.

Written work:
One essay, a maximum of 2,000 words
The work must be written in English and on a legal topic. Academic work from your most recent qualification is preferred, but work written in a professional context may be submitted if academic work is not readily available.

Oxford MBA 1 + 1 2nd year

Cost:
£71,540

Core Courses

https://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/programmes/mbas/mba/academic-curriculum/core-courses-and-electives

Accounting
Analytics
Business Finance
Capitalism in Debate
Firms and Markets
Marketing
Organisational Behaviour
Strategy
Technology and Operations Management

'Explain why you see the 1+1 MBA as particularly beneficial for you and how it fits with your career and personal development aims' (maximum 250 words).

What does my written statement need to be about?
Mandatory statement:

Please provide a personal statement that outlines anything additional that you would like the admissions committee to consider (Maximum 250 words)
If you are applying to the 1+1 programme you also need to submit the following essay:

Explain why you see this as particularly beneficial for you and how it fits with your career and personal development aims (Maximum 250 words)
Re-applicants will need to complete the essays mentioned above and another essay on the topic:

What improvements have you made in your candidacy since you last applied to the Oxford MBA? (Maximum 250 words)

I can say I want to create a company which will change the world and results in a NASDAQ or NYSE or even LSE stock market floatation and is acquired by one of Microsoft, Dell, Samsung, Google, Apple, Facebook, Twitter or TikTok. :biggrin: lol :wink:
(edited 1 year ago)
How old are you OP?? And why have you decided to apply in 10 years time lmao?? That's a long time and a lot can change before then.
Original post by Son of the Sea
How old are you OP?? And why have you decided to apply in 10 years time lmao?? That's a long time and a lot can change before then.


Exactly. Plus there is massive competition for the above places which no guarantee of getting in, even with top grades. But, of course, you know this.

I am just waiting impatiently for this blue plaque I am supposed to be getting at Exeter college, lol…
Original post by thegeek888
I still remember most of my A-Level Maths and Chemistry content, so it is just revision and the textbooks are excellent with model answers too, so A-Level Further Maths at A* grade too won't be too difficult to achieve.

I mean, good luck, but if you think half remembering A level maths means that an A* in FM will be easy I'm afraid you're living in cloud cuckoo land.

I'm sorry it won't be what you want to hear, but if you want to do all these A levels with amazing grades, forget all this "I'm going to" fantasy nonsense and the pointless basic level analysis of statistics which don't mean anything. Start learning A level FM now. Today. Otherwise you never will. It'll always be something you're going to do next year.
Original post by Son of the Sea
Exactly, in 10 years time they could have a good degree from elsewhere and want to go into a job or already be in one and the idea of doing a masters may be long in the dust haha.


I'm moving to Oxford permanently in less than a month so I'll make sure to visit Exeter and look out for it! Do you know exactly what part of college it'll be? And congratulations for getting that honour, OM! It's super well deserved!


Unfortunately op is kidding. There is no blue plaque for me at Exeter! I just thought it was a funny remark.

Lucky you, though, for being able to move to Oxford ( it would take a lottery win to get me moved there).

Enjoy!
Original post by Oxford Mum
Exactly. Plus there is massive competition for the above places which no guarantee of getting in, even with top grades. But, of course, you know this.

I am just waiting impatiently for this blue plaque I am supposed to be getting at Exeter college, lol…

I am in my early 30s, but I never succeeded first time round with A-Levels at 18. But now more than a decade later, I have got 54 Past Exam Papers for C1-C4 :biggrin: lol That includes the IAL International exams, which is literally the same specification syllabus. So I just need to practice the questions and I should get an A* in both Maths and Further Maths, where as Chemistry is a lot of practice makes perfect too but some topics occur in every exam. :wink:

I am also studying German, French and Spanish as I have also learned Russian, Urdu, Arabic and Chinese to a basic level. I should achieve A* in German and Spanish and maybe in French too.

So I will be able to apply to Cambridge University and London University: LSE, UCL, KCL and SOAS for a Bachelor's in Law degree. :smile:

But for postgraduate in the 2030s, I will apply for both Cambridge and Oxford Master's and MBA. But I don't really care if they don't accept me.

Obviously Oxford or Cambridge would be first choice for my LLM and MBA. But I have much more choice for an MBA degree in the United States.

Columbia Business School
Cornell University: Johnson
Dartmouth College: Tuck
George Washington University
Georgetown University: McDonough
Harvard Business School
MIT: Sloan
New York University: Stern
Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management
Stanford Graduate School of Business
UCLA Anderson School of Management
University of California at Berkeley: Haas
University of California at Irvine: Merage
University of Chicago: Booth
University of Maryland: Smith
University of Southern California: Marshall
Yale School of Management

They are all based near major airport cities: NEW YORK-LOS ANGELES-WASHINGTON D.C.-SAN FRANCISCO-CHICAGO-BOSTON. Eventually, I will marry an American too. :wink:

But I will donate to Oxford and Cambridge, as well as London Universities when I'm a prosperous businessman.
Original post by thegeek888
I am in my early 30s, but I never succeeded first time round with A-Levels at 18. But now more than a decade later, I have got 54 Past Exam Papers for C1-C4 :biggrin: lol That includes the IAL International exams, which is literally the same specification syllabus. So I just need to practice the questions and I should get an A* in both Maths and Further Maths, where as Chemistry is a lot of practice makes perfect too but some topics occur in every exam. :wink:

I am also studying German, French and Spanish as I have also learned Russian, Urdu, Arabic and Chinese to a basic level. I should achieve A* in German and Spanish and maybe in French too.

So I will be able to apply to Cambridge University and London University: LSE, UCL, KCL and SOAS for a Bachelor's in Law degree. :smile:

But for postgraduate in the 2030s, I will apply for both Cambridge and Oxford Master's and MBA. But I don't really care if they don't accept me.

Obviously Oxford or Cambridge would be first choice for my LLM and MBA. But I have much more choice for an MBA degree in the United States.

Columbia Business School
Cornell University: Johnson
Dartmouth College: Tuck
George Washington University
Georgetown University: McDonough
Harvard Business School
MIT: Sloan
New York University: Stern
Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management
Stanford Graduate School of Business
UCLA Anderson School of Management
University of California at Berkeley: Haas
University of California at Irvine: Merage
University of Chicago: Booth
University of Maryland: Smith
University of Southern California: Marshall
Yale School of Management

They are all based near major airport cities: NEW YORK-LOS ANGELES-WASHINGTON D.C.-SAN FRANCISCO-CHICAGO-BOSTON. Eventually, I will marry an American too. :wink:

But I will donate to Oxford and Cambridge, as well as London Universities when I'm a prosperous businessman.


What area of FM have you been studying this week?

You can't learn maths by acquiring papers. You need to sit down and do it.
Original post by skylark2
What area of FM have you been studying this week?

You can't learn maths by acquiring papers. You need to sit down and do it.

I have started on Complex Numbers, and it is going well so far.

There are 54 past papers for the C1, C2, C3 and C4 modules and around 100 for the M1 S1 D1 from 2001 - 2022. So I will have plenty of time to sit down and do the questions and study the mark schemes as well. :smile:

I think you went to Oxford and studied Physics? :s-smilie:
Original post by thegeek888
I have started on Complex Numbers, and it is going well so far.

There are 54 past papers for the C1, C2, C3 and C4 modules and around 100 for the M1 S1 D1 from 2001 - 2022. So I will have plenty of time to sit down and do the questions and study the mark schemes as well. :smile:

I think you went to Oxford and studied Physics? :s-smilie:


Yup, many years ago.

Well done for getting started.
Original post by skylark2
Yup, many years ago.

Well done for getting started.

So did you choose a 'lucrative' career path in "The City of London?" :wink: lol
Original post by thegeek888
So did you choose a 'lucrative' career path in "The City of London?" :wink: lol


You couldn't pay me enough to live in London or commute there, so no. I'm a software engineer.
Original post by Oxford Mum
There are also alumni willing to help.

Every year, students like my elder son have telethons, where they phone alumni and ask them to donate to the college. This can be to maintain the choir etc. It’s tough if you phone and get the wife, who can get annoyed as she wants to keep the money for themselves!


That's incredibly sexist - women go to Oxford too.
Original post by thegeek888
I have started on Complex Numbers, and it is going well so far.

There are 54 past papers for the C1, C2, C3 and C4 modules and around 100 for the M1 S1 D1 from 2001 - 2022. So I will have plenty of time to sit down and do the questions and study the mark schemes as well. :smile:

I think you went to Oxford and studied Physics? :s-smilie:


Some of those papers are for a completely different spec so it's pointless doing that many past papers on irrelevant topics.
Original post by aaq1
interesting - I know SW engineers with 5 years experience earning £100k+ in London - is that not enough to live in / commute to London.

Many finance, management consulting, banking opportunities are in London. How do people on those courses survive?

I think skylark was implying she wouldn't ever want to live in London, regardless of how much she was being paid. It's becoming more and more common now. I spent a while in London and I've left too and plan never to return!

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