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I'm an international student living in China and I've got 8s in math and economics in my IGCSE's. If possible, I would like to study economics in Cambridge or LSE, but I don't have further math. I'm currently in Y12 and if I worked very hard in A level maths in AS and A2 and achieved a very good grade, what are my chances of getting into these two schools
Original post by qiqi7777777
I'm an international student living in China and I've got 8s in math and economics in my IGCSE's. If possible, I would like to study economics in Cambridge or LSE, but I don't have further math. I'm currently in Y12 and if I worked very hard in A level maths in AS and A2 and achieved a very good grade, what are my chances of getting into these two schools

All Cambridge colleges require A level Mathematics, which you've got covered, and advise "you to do as much additional mathematics as possible."

If you look at the Economics entry requirements by College, here, you'll see that some colleges require a particular grade in Further Mathematics if you took it, and others require it if it was available at your school/college. However, other colleges make no mention of Further Mathematics at all. It would therefore seem wise to target one of those colleges in your application. As those colleges do not require Further Mathematics, or even express a preference for it, it seems unlikely that a lack of Further Mathematics would cause an issue with your application. However, you should probably heed the advice to "do as much additional mathematics as possible" - i.e. study some additional mathematics in your own time, and cover the fact that you have done so in your personal statement.

Note the following regarding "open" applications, here: "Please note that entry requirements can differ between Colleges and you may be allocated to a College with a higher typical offer, or which will make an offer based on particular grades in certain subjects." So, again, applying to a specific college which you know doesn't have a requirement or preference for Further Mathematics is the way to go.

LSE say that A-level Mathematics or equivalent is required, with Further Mathematics at A-level being desirable. However, they go on to say that, "We understand however that not everyone has the opportunity to follow a Further Mathematics programme, and you will not be disadvantaged because of this. Therefore it is helpful if you and/or your referees can indicate whether or not your school or college offers Further Mathematics classes." Does you school/college offer Further Mathematics? If they do, and you opted not to take it, than the implication is that you will be at a disadvantage if applying to LSE.
Original post by DataVenia
All Cambridge colleges require A level Mathematics, which you've got covered, and advise "you to do as much additional mathematics as possible."

If you look at the Economics entry requirements by College, here, you'll see that some colleges require a particular grade in Further Mathematics if you took it, and others require it if it was available at your school/college. However, other colleges make no mention of Further Mathematics at all. It would therefore seem wise to target one of those colleges in your application. As those colleges do not require Further Mathematics, or even express a preference for it, it seems unlikely that a lack of Further Mathematics would cause an issue with your application. However, you should probably heed the advice to "do as much additional mathematics as possible" - i.e. study some additional mathematics in your own time, and cover the fact that you have done so in your personal statement.

Note the following regarding "open" applications, here: "Please note that entry requirements can differ between Colleges and you may be allocated to a College with a higher typical offer, or which will make an offer based on particular grades in certain subjects." So, again, applying to a specific college which you know doesn't have a requirement or preference for Further Mathematics is the way to go.

LSE say that A-level Mathematics or equivalent is required, with Further Mathematics at A-level being desirable. However, they go on to say that, "We understand however that not everyone has the opportunity to follow a Further Mathematics programme, and you will not be disadvantaged because of this. Therefore it is helpful if you and/or your referees can indicate whether or not your school or college offers Further Mathematics classes." Does you school/college offer Further Mathematics? If they do, and you opted not to take it, than the implication is that you will be at a disadvantage if applying to LSE.


Thank you so much for the detailed response!!! Just one last question, if I took the STEP test hosted by Cambridge, would it enlarge my chances greatly or it wouldn't make any difference?
Original post by qiqi7777777
Thank you so much for the detailed response!!! Just one last question, if I took the STEP test hosted by Cambridge, would it enlarge my chances greatly or it wouldn't make any difference?

I've no idea I'm afraid. It would seem to following the advice to "do as much additional mathematics as possible." But whether it'd have any impact beyond that isn't clear. Sorry.
Original post by qiqi7777777
Thank you so much for the detailed response!!! Just one last question, if I took the STEP test hosted by Cambridge, would it enlarge my chances greatly or it wouldn't make any difference?


No, STEP is only considered when made part of an offer. Since STEP is taken after A-level exams (or towards the end of them) it will not have any influence on whether you receive an offer or not as you won't have done it by the time you apply. I've not heard of economics requiring STEP as part of an offer at Cambridge (or LSE for that matter) - at Cambridge it's the standard requirement for maths, and I think may occasionally be set as a requirement by some colleges for engineering (and CS maybe?).

I would recommend seeing if you can take AS Further Maths at least - this would be much better than not doing any FM qualification.

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